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Encyclopedia > List of Frankish Kings

The Franks were originally lead by dukes (military leaders) and reguli (petty kings). The Salian Merovingians rose to dominance among the Franks and united the petty kingdoms as well as most of Roman Gaul around 500. The Merovingians were later replaced by a new dynasty called the Carolingians in the 8th century. The Carolingians themselves were succeeded by other dynasties in the 9th and 10th century, most notably the Saxon Ottonians in the East and the Frankish Capetians in the West. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... The Misspeling of Ducks ... The Salian Dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire was founded by Conrad II (c. ... For other uses of the term Merovingian, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Gaul in the Roman Empire Roman Gaul consisted of an area of provincial rule in what would become modern day France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and western Germany. ... Events Possible date for the Battle of Mons Badonicus: Romano-British and Celts defeat an Anglo-Saxon army that may have been led by the bretwalda Aelle of Sussex (approximate date; suggested dates range from 490 to 510) Note: This battle may have influenced the legend of King Arthur. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Ottonian dynasty is a name sometimes given to a ruling dynasty of German kings, sometimes regarded as the first dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire, (though Charlemagne is commonly viewed as the original founder. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ...


A timeline of Frankish rulers is difficult since the realm was, according to old Germanic practice, frequently divided among the sons of a leader upon his death and then eventually reunited.

Contents

Dukes and reguli

Early rulers

This list of early rulers is incomplete, as our sources leave open many gaps.

Genobaud was a leader (dux) of the Franks. ... Sunno was a leader (dux) of the Franks in the late 4th century that invaded the Roman Empire in the year 388 when the usurper and leader of the whole of Roman Gaul, Magnus Maximus was surrounded in Aquileia by Theodosius I The invasion is documented by Gregory of Tours... Marcomer was a Frankish duke (dux, leader) in the late 4th century. ... Duke Pharamond Pharamond (c. ... Theudemeres (Theudemer) was a Frankish king. ... Flavius Richomeres (Richomer) was a Frank that lived in the late 4th century. ...

Rulers of the Salians

  • Clodio, possible son of Pharamond, King at Dispargum and later Tournai (426–447)
  • Merovech, son of Chlodio, King at Tournai (447–458)
  • Childeric I, son of Merovech, King at Tournai (458–481)
    • Aegidius (died 464), Gallo-Roman general who replaced Childeric I for a time
  • Clovis I, son of Childeric I, King at Tournai (481–511), later united most pf the Franks and Roman Gaul

All of the following were related to Clovis in some degree and eventually removed by him in 508: The Salian Dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire was founded by Conrad II (c. ... Clodio1 (c. ... Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik in Latin: Tornacum) is a municipality located 85 kilometres southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt (in French: Escaut, in Dutch: Schelde), in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... Merowig (fl. ... Childeric I (c. ... Aegidius (unknown - 464) was the magister militum per Gallias during the reign of the Roman emperor Majorian, and in the chaos of Gaul in the middle of the fifth century preserved a Gallo-Roman rump state in the region surrounding Soissons. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ...

  • Chararic, probably king at Arras or Boulogne from before 486, dethroned and later killed by Clovis in 508
  • Ragnachar, probably king at Cambrai from before 486, killed by Clovis
  • Ricchar, brother of Ragnachar, killed by Clovis at Cambrai
  • Rignomer, brother of Ragnachar, killed by Clovis at Mans

Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Boulogne is the name of several communes in France: Boulogne in the Vendée département Boulogne-Billancourt, in the Hauts-de-Seine département Boulogne-sur-Mer, in the Pas_de_Calais département This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Cambrai (Dutch: Kamerijk) is a French city and commune, in the Nord département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... For the word man, see man (word). ...

Rulers of the Ripuarians

  • Clovis, Duke until 448
  • Childebert, Duke 448–461, King 461–483
  • Sigebert the Lame, King 483–507, killed by his son Chloderic
  • Cloderic the Parricide, son of Sigebert, King 507, dethroned by Clovis
The Ripuarian Franks accepted Clovis as their king in 507.

The Ripuarian Franks (river Franks) were a subgroup of the Franks. ... The Ripuarian Franks (river Franks) were a subgroup of the Franks. ...

Merovingian kings of the Franks

All the Franks

Clovis I united all the Frankish petty kingdoms as well as most of Roman Gaul under his rule, conquering the kingdom of the Roman general Syagrius as well as the Visigothic Kingdom of Tolouse. He took his seat at Paris, which along with Soissons, Reims, Metz, and Orléans became the chief residences. Upon his death, the kingdom was split among his four sons: Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Events Births Emperor Kimmei of Japan († 571) Adi Sankara Deaths Categories: 509 ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Gaul in the Roman Empire Roman Gaul consisted of an area of provincial rule in what would become modern day France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and western Germany. ... The captured Syagrius is brought before Alaric II who orders him sent to Clovis I Afranius Syagrius (born 430, died 486 or 487) was the son of Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias, who had preserved a rump state around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Soissons is a town and commune in the Aisne département, Picardie, France, located on the Aisne River, about 60 miles northeast of Paris. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Orléans Cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Cross, built from 1278 to 1329; after being pillaged by Huguenots in the 1560s, the Bourbon kings restored it in the 17th century. ...

Soissons

Paris Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ...

Orléans Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ...

Reims Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer, born around 495, was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events Childebert I annexes Orléans and Chartres after the death of Chlodomer. ... Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Events Childebert I annexes Orléans and Chartres after the death of Chlodomer. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... Events May 7 - In Constantinople, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapses. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ...

Chlothar I eventually inherited all of the Frankish kingdoms after the deaths of his brothers or their successors. After his own death, the kingdom was once again split among his four sons: Theuderic I (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (died 533 or 534) was the Merovingian king of Metz, Rheims, or Austrasia—as its variously called—from 511 to 533 or 534. ... Events Frankish kingdom split in four after the death of Clovis I; Childebert I becomes king of Paris, Clotaire I becomes king of Soissons, Chlodomer becomes king of Orléans, and Theuderic I becomes king of Reims and Austrasia. ... Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... Theodebert I (French Thibert Ier or Théodebert Ier), (circa 500 - 547 or 548), Merovingian king of Austrasia from 533 - 548, residence: Reims, now in northeast France. ... Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... Events Belisarius is relieved of command over the Byzantine forces in Italy and replaced with Narses. ... Théodebald (French Thibaud or Théodebald), (d. ... Events Belisarius is relieved of command over the Byzantine forces in Italy and replaced with Narses. ... For other uses, see number 555. ... Chlothar I (or Chloderic, Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. ... For other uses, see number 555. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ...

Soissons (eventually Neustria)

Paris Chilpéric I was born c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ...

Orléans (eventually Burgundy) Charibert I (c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events Livva I succeeds Athanagild as king of the Visigoths. ... Chilpéric I was born c. ... Events Livva I succeeds Athanagild as king of the Visigoths. ... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events The Visigoths conquer the Suevi kingdom in Spain. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ...

Reims and Metz (eventually Austrasia) Guntram I(c. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events After the great slaughter at Woddesbeorg, Ceawlin is deposed as both king of Wessex and Bretwalda. ... Childebert II (570-595) was the king of Austrasia from 575 until his death in 595, the eldest and succeeding son of Sigebert I, and the king of Burgundy from 592 to his death, as the adopted and succeeding son of his uncle Guntram. ... Events After the great slaughter at Woddesbeorg, Ceawlin is deposed as both king of Wessex and Bretwalda. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Theuderic II (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (587-613), king of Burgundy (595-613) and Austrasia (612-613), was the second son of Childebert II. At his fathers death in 595, he received the kingdoms of Orleans and Burgundy. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert II can refer to: Sigebert II of the East Saxons, a seventh century ruler of Essex Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, an early seventh century Frankish ruler This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ...

Chlothar II defeated Brunhilda and her grandson, reunifying the kingdom. However, in 623, in order to appease particularistic forces and also to secure the borders, he gave the Austrasians his young son as their own king. His son and successor, Dagobert I, emulated this move by appointing a sub-king for Aquitaine, with a seat at Toulouse, in 629 and Austrasia in 634. Sigebert I (535-575) was a Frankish King, one of the sons of Clotaire I and Ingund. ... Clotaire I dies, and the Frankish kingdom is divided; Sigebert I becomes king of Austrasia, Chilperic I becomes king of Neustria, Charibert becomes king of Paris, and Guntram becomes king of Burgundy. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ... Childebert II (570-595) was the king of Austrasia from 575 until his death in 595, the eldest and succeeding son of Sigebert I, and the king of Burgundy from 592 to his death, as the adopted and succeeding son of his uncle Guntram. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Theudebert II (586-612), king of Austrasia (595-612), was the son and heir of Childebert II. He received the kingdom of Austrasia at the death of his father in 595, but was dominated by his grandmother Brunhilda, whom he succeeded in driving away in 599. ... Events The first mention of the state of Karantania on monuments. ... Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... Theuderic II (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) (587-613), king of Burgundy (595-613) and Austrasia (612-613), was the second son of Childebert II. At his fathers death in 595, he received the kingdoms of Orleans and Burgundy. ... Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Sigebert II can refer to: Sigebert II of the East Saxons, a seventh century ruler of Essex Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, an early seventh century Frankish ruler This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 584 – 629), called the Great (le Grand) or the Young (le Jeune), King of Neustria, and, from 613 to 629, King of all the Franks, was not yet born when his father, King Chilperic I died in... Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Events Clotaire II, king of the Franks, makes his son Dagobert I king of Austrasia Samo, reputedly a Frankish merchant, governs in Moravia, Slovakia and Lower Austria. ... Philippoteaux and Girardet, Die Folterung von Brunhilde. ... Dagobert I (c. ... New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Region Midi-Pyrénées Department Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City Statistics...

Neustria and Burgundy

Aquitaine Dagobert I (c. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Clovis II (or Chlodowech or Chlodwig, modern French Louis, modern German Ludwig) (637-November 27, 655) succeeded his father Dagobert I in 639 as King of Neustria and Burgundy. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Events The union of Slavic tribes falls apart after Samos death Births Deaths King Samo of the Slavs Categories: 658 ... Chlothar III (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 652 – 673) was the eldest son of Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, and his queen Balthild. ... Events The union of Slavic tribes falls apart after Samos death Births Deaths King Samo of the Slavs Categories: 658 ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Theuderic III was a King of the Franks in the 7th century, one of the Merovingian line. ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Childeric II (c. ... Events Hlothhere becomes king of Kent Maelduin becomes King of Dalriada Foundation of Ely, England Births Bede, English monk, writer and historian (or 672) Deaths Childeric II, Frankish king of Austrasia, Neustria and Burgundy Domangart II, King of Dalriada General Kim Yu-shin of Silla Heads of states Japan - Temmu... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Theuderic III was a King of the Franks in the 7th century, one of the Merovingian line. ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ...

Austrasia Charibert II (after 618 – April 8, 632), a son of Clotaire II and his second wife Sichilde, of the Merovingian dynasty, was briefly king in Aquitaine, 629-631/2, with his capital at Toulouse. ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Chilperic (sometimes Childeric in the chronicles of the time) was the infant son of Charibert II, and briefly king of Aquitaine in 632. ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Dagobert I (c. ... Events Abu Bakr becomes first caliph or Successor of the Prophet, leader of Islam Abu Bakr defeats Mosailima in the Battle of Akraba. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ...

Theuderic III was recognized as king of all the Franks in 679. From then on, the kingdom of the Franks can be treated as a unity again for all but a very brief period of civil war. Dagobert I (c. ... Events Clotaire II, king of the Franks, makes his son Dagobert I king of Austrasia Samo, reputedly a Frankish merchant, governs in Moravia, Slovakia and Lower Austria. ... Events The Arabs invade Palestine. ... Sigebert III (c. ... Events The Arabs invade Palestine. ... Events Ali succeeds Uthman as Caliph Battle of Basrah (also known as Battle of the Camel) Oswiu of Northumbria annexes Mercia Births Deaths Uthman ibn Affan, Caliph (murdered) Peada, king of Mercia (murdered) Categories: 656 ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... Events Ali succeeds Uthman as Caliph Battle of Basrah (also known as Battle of the Camel) Oswiu of Northumbria annexes Mercia Births Deaths Uthman ibn Affan, Caliph (murdered) Peada, king of Mercia (murdered) Categories: 656 ... Events Caliph Ali Ben Abu Talib is assassinated. ... Chlothar III (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 652 – 673) was the eldest son of Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, and his queen Balthild. ... Events Caliph Ali Ben Abu Talib is assassinated. ... Events The regent Grimuald usurps the kingship of the Lombards, driving Perctarit into exile and killing Godepert Births Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, Japanese poet (approximate date) Deaths Maximus the Confessor, Byzantine theologian Godepert, king of the Lombards Categories: 662 ... Childeric II (c. ... Events The regent Grimuald usurps the kingship of the Lombards, driving Perctarit into exile and killing Godepert Births Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, Japanese poet (approximate date) Deaths Maximus the Confessor, Byzantine theologian Godepert, king of the Lombards Categories: 662 ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Clovis III, son of Theuderic III, was born in 682 AD and died in 695. ... Events The abbey of Abingdon, England is founded Aldhelm made abbot Aethelred succeeds his brother Wulfhere as king of Mercia Births Deaths Wulfhere, king of Japan - Temmu Emperor of Japan (672-686) Categories: 675 ... Events November 2 - Donus becomes Pope. ... Dagobert II the Young (ca 650 – December 23, 679) was a Frankish king, the son of Sigebert III, one of the rois-fainéants (do-nothing kings) and the last Merovingian king of Austrasia. ... Events November 2 - Donus becomes Pope. ... Events Adamnan becomes abbot of the monastery on Iona. ...

Clovis IV, son of Theuderic III, was born in 682 AD and died in 695. ... Events The building of the Dome of the Rock is completed People Theuderic III succeeded by Clovis III Wilfrid, Bishop of Northumbria, expelled to Mercia See also Unterseeboot 691 Categories: 691 ... Events People of Byzantium revolt against Justinian II. Leontius II made emperor, Justinian II is banished. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... Events People of Byzantium revolt against Justinian II. Leontius II made emperor, Justinian II is banished. ... See also: phone number 711. ... Chlothar IV (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; died ca 719), king of Austrasia (717-718), was installed by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, as an ally during the civil war that was then raging. ... March 21 - Battle of Vincy between Charles Martel and Ragenfrid. ... Events Umayyad caliph Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz succeeded by Yazid II ibn Abd al-Malik The Nihonshoki (日本書紀), one of the oldest history books in Japan, is completed Births Bertrada, wife of Pippin III (d. ... Dagobert III (c. ... See also: phone number 711. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Chilperic II refers to either: Chilperic II of Neustria and I of Austrasia Chilperic II of the Franks This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Former Byzantine emperor Anastasius II leads a revolt against emperor Leo III Theuderic IV succeeds Chilperic II Battle of Toulouse - Al-Samh ibn Malik al-Khawlani, the governor Muslim Spain (al-Andalus) is defeated by Duke Odo of Aquitaine preventing an Arab invasion of Gaul. ... Chlothar IV (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; died ca 719), king of Austrasia (717-718), was installed by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, as an ally during the civil war that was then raging. ... March 21 - Battle of Vincy between Charles Martel and Ragenfrid. ... Events Umayyad caliph Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz succeeded by Yazid II ibn Abd al-Malik The Nihonshoki (日本書紀), one of the oldest history books in Japan, is completed Births Bertrada, wife of Pippin III (d. ... Theuderic IV (or Theuderich, Theoderic, or Theodoric; in French, Thierry) was the Merovingian King of the Franks from 721 until his death in 737. ... Former Byzantine emperor Anastasius II leads a revolt against emperor Leo III Theuderic IV succeeds Chilperic II Battle of Toulouse - Al-Samh ibn Malik al-Khawlani, the governor Muslim Spain (al-Andalus) is defeated by Duke Odo of Aquitaine preventing an Arab invasion of Gaul. ... Events Favila becomes king of Asturias after Pelayos death Births Emperor Kammu of Japan (d. ... An interregnum is a period between monarchs, between popes of the Roman Catholic Church, emperors of Holy Roman Empire, polish kings (elective monarchy) or between consuls of the Roman Republic. ... Events Favila becomes king of Asturias after Pelayos death Births Emperor Kammu of Japan (d. ... Events Umayyad caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik (724-743) succeeded by al-Walid II ibn Abd al-Malik (743-744). ... Childeric III (died about 754), called either the Idiot or the Phantom King, king of the Franks, was the fourteenth and last king of the Merovingian dynasty. ... Events Umayyad caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik (724-743) succeeded by al-Walid II ibn Abd al-Malik (743-744). ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ...

Carolingians

Mayors of the palace

The Carolingians were initially mayors of the palace under the Merovingian kings, first in Austrasia and later in Neustria and Burgundy. In 687, Pippin of Heristal took the title Duke and Prince of the Franks (dux et princeps Francorum) after his conquest of Neustria in at the Battle of Tertry. This was cited by contemporary chroniclers as the beginnning of Pippin's "reign." Between 715 and 716, the descendants of Pippin disputed the succession. The mayors of the palace were the chief officials of the Merovingian kings. ... The Carolingians were a dynasty of rulers that eventually controlled the Frankish realm and its successors from the 8th to the 10th century, officially taking over the kingdom from the Merovingian dynasty in 751. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus or majordomo, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... The title dux et princeps Francorum, or duke and prince of the Franks, was the title adopted by Pepin of Heristal after his epoch-making victory at the Battle of Tertry in 687. ... The Battle of Tertry was an important engagement in Merovingian Gaul between the forces of Austrasia on one side and those of Neustria and Burgundy on the other. ...

  • Pippin I (Austrasia: 623–629 and 639–640)
  • Grimoald I (Austrasia: 643–656; died 662)
  • Pippin II (Austrasia: 680–714, Neustria and Burgundy: 687–695)
  • Drogo (Burgundy: 695–708)
  • Grimoald II (Neustria: 695–714, Burgundy: 708–714)
  • Theudoald (Austrasia, Neustria, and Burgundy: 714–716)
  • Charles Martel (Austrasia: 715–741, Neustria and Burgundy: 718–741)
  • Carloman (Austrasia: 741–747; died 754 or 755)
  • Pippin III (Neustria and Burgundy: 741–751, Austrasia: 747–751)

In 751, Pippin III became the King of the Franks and the office of mayor disappeared. The Carolingians displaced the Merovingians as the ruling dynasty. Pippin of Landen, also known as Pippin the Elder (580 - 640), was the Frankish Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia under the Merovingian kings Clotaire II, Dagobert I and Sigebert III from 615 or 623 to 629. ... Grimoald I (616-662), called the Elder (in French, Grimaud) was the Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia from 643 to 656. ... Pippin of Herstal (or Pepin; Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, Pippin the Younger (as with his grandson), or Pippin II, (635 or 640–December 16, 714, Jupille) was the grandson of Pippin (I) the Elder through the marriage of Ansegisel and Begga, the daughter of the Elder. ... Drogo (670-708), son of Pepin the Middle and Plectrude, was the duke of Champagne by appointment of his father in 690 and duke of Burgundy from the death of Nordebert in 697. ... Grimoald II (or French Grimaud) (d. ... Theudoald or Theodald was the mayor of the palace, briefly unopposed in 714 until Ragenfrid was acclaimed in Neustria and Charles Martel in Austrasia by the nobles, after the death of his grandfather, Pepin of Heristal. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Carloman (716–754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia and Chrotrud. ... Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ...


Kings of the Franks

The Frankish kingdom was then divided with the Treaty of Verdun in 843 among the sons of Louis the Pious. Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... Carloman (751 - December 4, 771) was a King of the Franks (768 - 771). ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pippin of Italy (April, 773 – July 8, 810) was the son of Charlemagne and king of Italy (781-810) under the authority of his father. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Lothar (in older English texts, sometimes Lothair) (795 - March 2, 855), Holy Roman Emperor, was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Irmengarde (Ermengarde), daughter of Ingramm (Ingerman), the Duke of Hesbaye. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... Pepin I (797-November 13 or December 13, 838) was King of Aquitaine. ... Pepin II, called the Younger (823-after 864, Senlis), was King of Aquitaine from 838 as the successor upon the death of his father, Pepin I. Pepin II was eldest son of Pepin I and Ingeltrude (also called Engelberga, Hringard, or Ringart), daughter of the count of Madrie, Theodobert. ... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... Lothar (in older English texts, sometimes Lothair) (795 - March 2, 855), Holy Roman Emperor, was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Irmengarde (Ermengarde), daughter of Ingramm (Ingerman), the Duke of Hesbaye. ... Geopolitical divisions according to the Treaty of Verdun. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ...


The following table lists only the rulers in the three subdivisions, which are the kernels of later kingdoms France and Germany, leaving out Italy.


(Names marked * were not Carolingians, but still distantly related to the dynasty.

Western Kingdom (eventually France)

Middle Kingdom Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ...

Eastern Kingdom (eventually Germany)





















Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ...



Louis the Stammerer (November 1, 846 – April 10, 879), also known as Louis II and Louis le Begue, was the son of Charles II and Ermentrude of Orléans. ... Louis III (c. ... Carloman (died December 12, 884), king of Western Francia, was the eldest son of King Louis the Stammerer, and became king, together with his brother Louis III, on his fathers death in 879. ...



Romantic portrait of Charles. ... Odo (or Eudes) (c. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ...

After this, the House of Capet ruled France. For the continuation, see the list of French monarchs. Robert I (c. ... Rudolph of Burgundy (also Raoul or Ralph) (died January 15, 936) was duke of Burgundy between 921/923 and King of Western Francia from this date to his death. ... Louis IV dOutremer: King of France 936 to 954, member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Lothair (941-986), king of France, son of Louis IV, succeeded his father in 954, and was at first under the guardianship of Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, and then under that of his maternal uncle Bruno, archbishop of Cologne. ... King Louis V of France (ca. ... The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later...

After Lothar's death in 855, his realm was divided between his sons: Lothar (in older English texts, sometimes Lothair) (795 - March 2, 855), Holy Roman Emperor, was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Irmengarde (Ermengarde), daughter of Ingramm (Ingerman), the Duke of Hesbaye. ... Events Louis II succeeds Lothar as western emperor. ...

  • Louis II, 855-875, the eldest son, succeeded his father as Emperor and received Italy. For the continuation, see King of Italy
  • Lothar II, 855-869, the second son, received the Frankish parts of his father's realm, which after him were called Lotharingia.

Kings of Lotharingia Louis II, (825 – 875), Holy Roman Emperor (sole ruler 855 – 875), eldest son of the emperor Lothair I, became the designated king of Italy in 839, and taking up his residence in that country was crowned king at Rome by Pope Sergius II on June 15, 844. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... King of Italy is a title adopted by many rulers after the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the... Charles was the Carolingian King of Provence from 855 until his early death in 863. ... The following is a list of the Kings of Burgundy // Kings of the Burgundians Gebicca (late 4th century–407) Godemar Giselcar Gundicar (413–436) Aetius moves the Burgundians into Sapaudia (Upper Rhone Basin) Gunderic/Gundioc (436–473) opposed by Chilperic I (443–c. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I...

Charles the Bald claimed Lotharingia at his nephew's death and was crowned king in Metz, but his brother Louis the German opposed his claim and in 870 the Treaty of Meersen divided Lotharingia between the two brothers and subsequently their sons. In 880, the Treaty of Ribemont gave the whole of Lotharingia to Louis the Younger, son of Louis the German. Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... Louis III was the Frankish king of Saxony from 876 to 882. ...



After this Lotharingia was permanently subsumed into the Eastern or German kingdom and the Holy Roman Empire. For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Romantic portrait of Charles. ... Arnulf of Carinthia (German Arnulf von Kärnten, Slovenian Arnulf Koroški) (850 – December 8, 899) was one of the last ruling members of the Carolingian house in the Eastern part of the Frankish Kingdom, which had been split in the Treaty of Verdun in 843. ... Zwentibold (870 – August 13, 900) was the illegimate son of the Emperor Arnulf of Carinthia. ... The last true Carolingian ruler of East Francia, Louis the Child (893–20 or 24 September 911) was the only legitimate son of the Emperor Arnulf and his wife, Ota, a member of the Conradine Dynasty. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ...






















Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire...


After this, Conrad of Franconia (*) ruled from 911-918, and was followed by the Saxon Ottonian dynasty.These events are commonly considered the transition from the Eastern Frankish to the German Kingdom and the Holy Roman Empire. For the continuation, see the list of German monarchs. For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Carloman (830-880) was a member of the Eastern Frankish Carolingian ruling house. ... Romantic portrait of Charles. ... Arnulf of Carinthia (German Arnulf von Kärnten, Slovenian Arnulf Koroški) (850 – December 8, 899) was one of the last ruling members of the Carolingian house in the Eastern part of the Frankish Kingdom, which had been split in the Treaty of Verdun in 843. ... The last true Carolingian ruler of East Francia, Louis the Child (893–20 or 24 September 911) was the only legitimate son of the Emperor Arnulf and his wife, Ota, a member of the Conradine Dynasty. ... Conrad I (or Konrad), duke of Franconia, was king of the East Franconian Kingdom from 911 to 918, the first and only king of the Conradine (Franconian) dynasty. ... Ottonian dynasty is a name sometimes given to a ruling dynasty of German kings, sometimes regarded as the first dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire, (though Charlemagne is commonly viewed as the original founder. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ...

See also

For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... The mayors of the palaces of Austrasia and Neustria were the chief officials of the Merovingian kings. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later...

External links

  • Genealogy of Merovingian Kings
  • Genealogy of Carolingian Kings

For further reading

  • The history of France as recounted in the "Grandes Chroniques de France," and particularly in the personal copy produced for King Charles V between 1370 and 1380 that is the saga of the three great dynasties, the Merovingians, Carolingians, and the Capetians, that shaped the institutions and the frontiers of the realm. This document was produced and likely commissioned during the Hundred Years' War, a dynastic struggle between the rulers of France and England with rival claims to the French throne. It should therefore be read and considered carefully as a source, due to the inherent bias in the context of its origins.
  • The Cambridge Illustrated History of France - Cambridge University Press
  • The Origins of France: Clovis to the Capetians 500-1000 by Edward James ISBN 0-333-27052-5
  • Late Merovingian France: History and Hagiography, 640-720 (Manchester Medieval Sources); Paul Fouracre (Editor), Richard A. Gerberding (Editor)ISBN 0-7190-4791-9
  • Britannica Concise Encyclopedia: Merovingian Dynasty: [1].
  • Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, eds. W. Kibler and G. Zinn. New York: Garland Publishing, 1995.

  Results from FactBites:
 
List of Frankish Kings - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
The Frankish kingdoms were ruled by two main dynasties, the Merovingians (who established the realm) and later the Carolingians.
The Frankish kingdom was then divided with the Treaty of Verdun in 843 among the sons of Louis the Pious.
The history of France as recounted in the "Grandes Chroniques de France," and particularly in the personal copy produced for King Charles V between 1370 and 1380 that is the saga of the three great dynasties, the Merovingians, Carolingians, and the Capetian Rulers of France, that shaped the institutions and the frontiers of the realm.
Franks (2140 words)
While in later France, the kingdom became hereditary, the kings of the later Holy Roman Empire were unable to abolish this tradition and continued to be elected until the Empire's formal end in 1806.
On December 23 and 24, 800, Charles was crowned Emperor by Pope Leo III in Rome in a ceremony that formally acknowledged the Frankish Empire to be the successor of the (Western) Roman one.
His third son Charles the Bald became King of the West Franks; this area is the foundation for the later France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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