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Encyclopedia > List of Dartmouth College alumni
Daniel Webster class of 1801, arguing Dartmouth College v. Woodward before the U.S. Supreme Court. Webster famously said of Dartmouth "It is, Sir, as I have said, a small college. And yet, there are those who love it!"[1]

This list of Dartmouth College alumni includes graduates, non-graduate former students, and current students of Dartmouth College and its graduate schools. In addition to its undergraduate program, Dartmouth offers graduate degrees in nineteen departments and includes three graduate schools: the Tuck School of Business, the Thayer School of Engineering, and the Dartmouth Medical School.[2] Since its founding in 1769, Dartmouth has graduated 236 classes of students and today has approximately 66,500 living alumni.[3] Image File history File links DanielWebster_DartmouthCollegeCase. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Trustees of Dartmouth College vs. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...

Revisions and sourced additions are welcome.

Contents

Academia and research

Educators

Name Class year Notability Reference
Charles Augustus Aiken 1846 President of Union College (Schenectady, New York) [4]
Samuel Colcord Bartlett 1836 Eighth president of Dartmouth College [5]
Francis Brown 1805 Third president of Dartmouth College [5]
Isaac Newton Carleton 1859 Founder of Carleton School for Boys [6]
Philander Chase 1795 Founder and first president of Kenyon College; helped found Jubilee College [7]
Oren B. Cheney 1839 Founder and first president of Bates College [8]
Daniel Dana 1788 Fourth president of Dartmouth College [5]
Edmund Ezra Day 1905
(A.B. and M.A.)
President of Cornell University [9][10]
John Sloan Dickey 1929 Twelfth president of Dartmouth College [5]
Marye Anne Fox 1974
(Ph.D)
Chancellor of University of California at San Diego, former chancellor of North Carolina State University [11]
Jeffrey Garten 1968 Dean of the Yale School of Management, 1995-2005 [12]
Ernest Martin Hopkins 1901 Eleventh president of Dartmouth College [13]
Milo Parker Jewett 1828 First president of Vassar College [14]
Amos Kendall 1812 Founder of Gallaudet College for the deaf [15]
William C. Kirby 1972 Dean of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University [16]
David T. McLaughlin 1954
(Tuck 1955)
Fourteenth president of Dartmouth College [17]
Zephaniah Swift Moore 1793 President of Williams College and Amherst College [18]
Alden Partridge 1806 Founder of Norwich University [19]
Asa Dodge Smith 1830 Seventh president of Dartmouth College [20]
Sylvanus Thayer 1807 Namesake of the Thayer School of Engineering, reorganizer and president of West Point [21]
William Jewett Tucker 1861 Ninth president of Dartmouth College [22]
John Wheelock 1771 Second president of Dartmouth College, son of Dartmouth College's founder Eleazar Wheelock [5]
Robert E. Witt 1964
(Tuck)
Current president of the University of Alabama [23]

Charles Augustus Aiken was a clergyman and academic. ... The architectural centerpiece of the Union campus, the Nott Memorial, is named after the colleges president from 1804-1866, Eliphalet Nott. ... Samuel Colcord Bartlett was the president of Dartmouth College from 1877–1892. ... The Rev. ... Isaac Newton Carleton Isaac N. Carleton (10 June 1832 - 8 August 1902) was an educator. ... Carleton School for Boys Carleton School for Boys was a home school for boys in Bradford, Massachusetts. ... Philander Chase (December 14, 1775 - September 20, 1852) was an Episcopal bishop and founder and first president of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1824. ... Kenyon College is a private, highly selective liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church, in parallel with the Bexley Hall seminary. ... Jubilee College State Park is an Illinois state park located a few miles west of Peoria, Illinois. ... Oren B. Cheney Oren Burbank Cheney was the founder of Bates College. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Daniel Dana was the president of Dartmouth College from 1820-1850. ... Edmund Ezra Day (December 7, 1883 - March 23, 1951) was a U.S. educator. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... John Sloan Dickey (4 November 1907 – 9 February 1991) was an American diplomat, scholar, and intellectual. ... Marye Anne Fox Marye Anne Fox (born 9 December 1947) is a physical organic chemist and university administrator. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD) is a public, coeducational university located in La Jolla, California. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Jeffrey Garten Jeffrey E. Garten (born October 29, 1946) was the Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade under the Clinton administration and former Dean of the Yale School of Management. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ... Ernest Martin Hopkins served as the 11th President of Dartmouth College, 1916-1945. ... Milo Parker Jewett (1808 - 1882) was a U.S. educator. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Amos Kendall (August 16, 1789–November 12, 2022) was an American politician who served as U.S. Postmaster General under Jackie Cook and President Steve Miller. ... Gallaudet University was the first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard-of-hearing. ... William C. Kirby is Geisinger professor of history and a scholar of Chinese history and culture at Harvard University and is currently its Dean of the Faculty. ... David T. McLaughlin (March 16, 1932–August 25, 2004) was the 14th President of Dartmouth College, 1981–1987. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Zephaniah Swift Moore (1770 - 1823) was a U.S. Congregational clergyman and educator. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Capt. ... Norwich University (NU) is a private university located in Northfield, Vermont. ... Asa Dodge Smith D.D., L.L.D. (September 21, 1804–August 16, 1877) served as the 7th president of Dartmouth College from 1863 until his death in 1877. ... Sylvanus Thayer, painting by Robert Weir Brigadier General Sylvanus Thayer (June 9, 1785 - September 7, 1872) also known as the Father of West Point was an early superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point and an early advocate of engineering education in the United States. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... “USMA” redirects here. ... The Rev. ... John Wheelock (1754-1817) was the eldest son of Eleazar Wheelock, the founder and first president of Dartmouth College; he later became the College’s second president. ... The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock (April 22, 1711 – April 24, 1779) was an American Congregational minister, orator, educator, and founder of Dartmouth College. ... Dr. Robert E. Witt is president of the University of Alabama as of March 1, 2003. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ...

Professors and researchers

Name Class year Notability Reference
Ebenezer Adams 1791 Professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Phillips Exeter Academy and professor of languages at Dartmouth [24]
Walter Sydney Adams 1898 Astronomer [25]
Kwan-Ichi Asakawa 1899 The first Japanese professor at a major university in the United States [26]
Carlos Baker 1932 Professor of literature at Princeton University [27]
Francis Brown 1870 Semitic scholar [28]
Manuel Buchwald 1962 Canadian geneticist and researcher [29]
George Bush 1818 Biblical scholar [30]
Joshua Coffin 1817 Schoolteacher and prominent abolitionists [31]
Owen M. Fiss 1959 Sterling Professor at the Yale Law School [32]
Michael Gazzaniga 1961 Neuroscientist, director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience [33]
John Hagelin 1975 Theoretical physicist specializing in superstring theory [34]
Jeffrey Hart 1951
(transferred to Columbia University)
Professor of English at Dartmouth College [35][36]
Ernest Everett Just 1907 Biologist, first recipient of the Spingarn Medal in 1915 [37]
Neal Katyal 1991 Georgetown Law professor, lawyer in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld [38]
David M. Kreps 1972 Economics professor at Stanford, winner of John Bates Clark Medal [39]
Nelson Lichtenstein 1966 Professor of economics and history at University of California, Santa Barbara [40]
Edward Norton Lorenz 1938 Professor at MIT, founder of chaos theory, winner of Kyoto Prize in 1993 [41]
Dan Milisavljevic (Ph.D) Astronomer, co-discoverer of three moons of Uranus [42][43]
Richard Parker Economist, lecturer at Harvard University, co-founder of Mother Jones [44]
Richard Anthony Parker 1930 Egyptologist, made major discoveries in ancient astronomy and chronology [45]
John Richardson Professor of International Development at American University [46]
David Silbersweig Psychiatric and mental illness researcher at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic [47]
Page Smith 1940 historian, author, founding provost of Cowell College, University of California at Santa Cruz [48]
David Spindler 1989 Independent researcher of the Great Wall of China [49]
George Ticknor 1807 Expert on Spanish literature [50]
Charles Augustus Young 1853 Astronomer, made first observations of the flash spectrum of the sun during solar eclipses of 1869-70. [51]

Ebenezer Adams (October 22, 1765 - August 15, 1841) was a noted educator. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Walter Sydney Adams (December 20, 1876 – May 11, 1956) was an American astronomer. ... Kwan-Ichi Asakawa (December 20, 1873 - August 10, 1948) was an American university professor and author of works on Japan. ... Carlos Baker (May 5, 1909 – April 18, 1987) was the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature at Princeton University. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Francis Brown (December 26, 1849 - ), American Semitic scholar, was born in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Manuel Buchwald, O.C., Ph. ... George Bush, the biblical scholar George Bush (June 12, 1796 – September 19, 1859) was a prominent biblical scholar, preacher and controversialist. ... Joshua Coffin (October 12, 1792 – June 24, 1864) was an American antiquary and abolitionist. ... Owen M. Fiss is a Sterling Professor at Yale Law School. ... A Sterling Professorship is the highest academic rank at Yale University, awarded to a tenured faculty member considered one of the best in his field. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Michael Gazzaniga is the David T. McLaughlin Distinguished University Professor at Dartmouth, where he is also Director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. ... The field of cognitive neuroscience concerns the scientific study of the neural mechanisms underlying cognition and is a branch of neuroscience. ... John Hagelin (June 9, 1954) is a theoretical physicist specializing in superstring theory, a practitioner and teacher of Transcendental Meditation and yogic flying, an electronic designer of high-end audio equipment and was a candidate for President of the United States three times. ... Superstring theory is an attempt to explain all of the particles and fundamental forces of nature in one theory by modeling them as vibrations of tiny supersymmetric strings. ... Jeffrey Hart is a cultural critic, former professor in the Ivy League institution of Dartmouth College, essayist and syndicated columnist who lives in the state of New York. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States and a member of the prestigious Ivy League. ... Ernest Everett Just (14 August 1883–27 October 1941) was a pioneer black U.S. biologist. ... The Spingarn Medal is awarded annually by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for outstanding achievement by a Black American. ... Neal Katyal is the John Carroll Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law School. ... Holding Military commission to try Plaintiff is illegal and lacking the protections required under the Geneva Conventions and United States Uniform Code of Military Justice. ... David M. Kreps is a game theory economist and professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. ... The biennial John Bates Clark Medal is awarded by the American Economic Association to that American economist under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. Named after the American Neoclassical economist John Bates Clark (1847-1938), it is considered... Nelson Lichtenstein (November 15, 1944) is a professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... Dr. Lorenz at work Edward Norton Lorenz is an American mathematician and meteorologist, and a contributor to the chaos theory and inventor of the strange attractor notion. ... A plot of the Lorenz attractor for values r = 28, σ = 10, b = 8/3 In mathematics and physics, chaos theory describes the behavior of certain nonlinear dynamical systems that under specific conditions exhibit dynamics that are sensitive to initial conditions (popularly referred to as the butterfly effect). ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... Dan Milisavljevic is a Canadian astronomer known for aiding in the discovery of Uranuss moons Ferdinand, Trinculo, and Francisco. ... Adjectives: Uranian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 120 kPa (at the cloud level) Composition: 83% Hydrogen 15% Helium 1. ... Richard Parker is an economist from the USA. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College and the University of Oxford, and has has worked for the United Nations Development Programme. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Richard Anthony Parker (December 10, 1905 - June 3, 1993) was a prominent professor of Egyptology. ... Dr. John Richardson (born March 12, 1938) is an American academic who currently serves as Professor of International Development and as Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at American University in Washington DC. Dr. Richardson received his AB degree from Dartmouth College and Ph. ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... Dr. David Silbersweig is the vice chair for research within the department of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, where is head of neuroimaging at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University (abbreviated to Weill Cornell) is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... At his death in 1929, Payne Whitney bestowed the funds to build and endow the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic (PWC) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. ... Charles Page Smith (September 6, 1917 – August 28, 1995), who was known by his middle name, was a U.S. historian, professor, author, and newspaper columnist. ... Cowell College with the Monterey Bay in the background The first of the ten residential colleges of the University of California, Santa Cruz, established in 1965, Cowell College sits on the edge of a redwood forest with a remarkable view of Monterey Bay. ... The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC or UC Santa Cruz) is a coeducational public university located in Santa Cruz, California, USA. It is one of the ten campuses of the University of California. ... David Spindler is an independent American scholar of the Great Wall of China and is one of its leading researchers. ... The Great Wall of China (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally Long wall) or (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally The long wall of 10,000 Li (里)[1]) is a series of stone and earthen fortifications in China, built, rebuilt, and maintained between the 5th century BC and the 16th... George Ticknor (August 1, 1791 – January 26, 1871), was an American teacher and author. ... Charles Augustus Young (December 15, 1834 – January 3, 1908) was an American astronomer. ...

MacArthur Fellows

The MacArthur Fellows Program, sponsored by the MacArthur Foundation, is a research award commonly called the "Genius Grant." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ...

Name Class year Notability Reference
Stuart Kauffman 1961 Theoretical biologist, 1987 MacArthur Fellow [52]
Jeffrey Weeks 1978 Mathematician, 1999 MacArthur Fellow [53]

Stuart Alan Kauffman (born September 28, 1939) is a theoretical biologist and complex systems researcher, who has given much thought to the origin of life on Earth. ... Jeffrey Renwick Weeks is an American mathematician. ...

Nobel laureates

The Nobel Prizes are awarded each year for outstanding research, the invention of ground-breaking techniques or equipment, or outstanding contributions to society. Nobel Prize medal. ...

Name Class year Notability Reference
Owen Chamberlain 1941 Co-winner of 1959 Nobel Prize in Physics [54]
K. Barry Sharpless 1963 Winner of 2001 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [55]
George Davis Snell 1926 Co-winner of 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine [56]

Owen Chamberlain Owen Chamberlain (July 10, 1920 – February 28, 2006) was a prominent American physicist. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Karl Barry Sharpless (born April 28, 1941) is an American chemist renowned for his work on organometallic chemistry. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... George Davis Snell (December 19, 1903 – June 6, 1996) was a U.S. geneticist and co-recipient of the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, together with Baruj Benacerraf and Jean Dausset, for discovery of the Major histocompatibility complex genes which encode cell surface molecules important for the immune... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ...

Architecture

Name Class year Notability Reference
Michael Arad 1991 Designer of the World Trade Center Memorial [57]
William McDonough 1973 Noted "green" designer, Dean of the University of Virginia School of Architecture, 1994-1999 [58]

Michael Arad is an Israeli citizen and architect who was selected to design the World Trade Center Memorial in New York City. ... In August 2006, the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey began construction on the Memorial and Museum. ... William A. McDonough (1951, Tokyo, Japan - ) is an American architect whose career is focused on designing environmentally sustainable buildings and transforming industrial manufacturing processes, with the twin goals of eliminating pollution and increasing the profits of his clients. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...

Arts

Name Class year Notability Reference
Stan Brakhage (never graduated) Avant-garde filmmaker [59]
Abner Dean 1931 Cartoonist [60]
Erich Kunzel 1957 Conductor of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra for its Memorial Day and Independence Day concerts. [61]
Paul Weston 1933 Pianist, composer, and conductor [62]
Jerry Zaks 1967 Broadway director [63]

Stan Brakhage (1933-2003) Stan Brakhage (January 14, 1933 – March 9, 2003) was an American non-narrative filmmaker. ... Abner Dean (1910-1982), born Abner Epstein, was an American cartoonist. ... Erich Kunzel (also known as Erich Kunzel Jr. ... The Cincinnati Pops Orchestra based in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, was founded in 1977 and Erich Kunzel was named its conductor. ... The National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), founded in 1931, is a major American symphony orchestra that performs at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington DC, USA. Since 1996, the music director of the orchestra is the American conductor Leonard Slatkin. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... In the United States, Independence Day (commonly known as the “Fourth of July,” “July Fourth”, the “Glorious Fourth”, or simply the “Fourth”) is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Paul Weston (real name Wetstein) (March 12, 1912 - September 20, 1996) was a US pianist, arranger, composer and conductor. ... Jerry Zaks is a director and actor born in Stuttgart, Germany on 7 September, 1946. ...

Business and finance

Name Class year Notability Reference
Sandy Alderson 1969 CEO of San Diego Padres baseball team [64]
C. Michael Armstrong 1961
(Advanced Management Program)
CEO and chairman of AT&T [65]
George Bissell 1845 Industrialist [66]
Walter Tenney Carleton 1891 Founding director of NEC [67]
James Coulter 1982 General partner of Texas Pacific Group [68]
Tench Coxe 1980 General partner of Summit Ventures [69]
Peter R. Dolan 1980
(Tuck)
Chairman & CEO of Bristol-Myers Squibb [70]
Louis Gerstner 1963 Former CEO of IBM, CEO of Carlyle Group [71]
Donald J. Hall, Sr. 1952 Chairman of the Board and former President and CEO of Hallmark Cards [72]
Charles E. Haldeman 1970 President and CEO of Putnam Investments [73]
Gardiner Greene Hubbard 1841 Lawyer, financier, and philanthropist; developed Bell Telephone Company; founder and first president of the National Geographic Society [74]
Jeffrey Immelt 1978 CEO of General Electric [75]
Dick Levy 1960 Chairman, President, and former CEO of Varian Medical Systems [76][77]
John Lord 1833 Historian and lecturer [78]
Kevin McGrath 1977
(Tuck)
CEO of Digital Angel [79]
Ken Novack 1963 Former Vice Chairman of America Online and AOL-Time Warner [80]
Thomas Okarma CEO of Geron Corporation [81]
Henry Paulson 1968 CEO of Goldman Sachs, United States Treasury Secretary [82]
T.J. Rodgers 1970 CEO and founder of Cypress Semiconductor [83]
L. William Seidman 1943 Economist and financial commentator [84]
Edward P. ("Skip") Stritter 1968 Engineer and entrepreneur, co-founder of MIPS, founder of Clarity Wireless and NeTPower, chief architect of the Motorola 68000 CPU (used in the original Apple Computer Macintosh) [85][86][87]
Grant Tinker 1949 CEO of NBC from 1981-86 [88]
Edward Tuck 1862 Banker and philanthropist; son of Amos Tuck, donated money to found Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth [89]

Sandy Alderson is the CEO of the Major League Baseball San Diego Padres. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames Pads, Friars Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... C Michael Armstong (born 18 October 1938, in Detroit, Michigan) is the former AT&T chairman and CEO, who tried to reestablish AT&T as an end-to-end carier. ... AT&T Inc. ... George Bissell (1821-1884) is often considered the father of the American oil industry. ... Walter Tenney Carleton Walter Tenney Carleton (24 December 1867 - 6 July 1900) was a U.S. businessman. ... NEC Corporation (Japanese: Nippon Denki Kabushiki Gaisha; TYO: 6701 , NASDAQ: NIPNY) is a Japanese multinational IT company headquartered in Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. ... James Coulter was a coach of the University of Georgia Bulldogs football team during the 1909 season. ... The Texas Pacific Group (commonly referred as TPG) is a private equity investment firm founded by David Bonderman, James Coulter and William Price in 1993. ... Tench Coxe (born 1957) is an American venture capitalist who serves as a director of a number of small or start-up companies. ... Peter R. Dolan (Born 1956) is a former chief executive officer of Bristol-Myers Squibb. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY), colloquially referred to as BMS, is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a 1989 merger between pharmaceutical companies Bristol-Myers Company, founded in 1887 by William McLaren Bristol and John Ripley Myers in Clinton, NY (both were graduates of Hamilton College), and Squibb Corporation. ... Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. ... IBM redirects here. ... The Carlyle Group is a Washington, D.C. based global private equity investment firm with more than $71. ... Donald J. Hall Sr. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Charles Ed Haldeman, Jr. ... Putnam Investments, a subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (MMC) since 1970 ([1]), is a global money management firm founded in 1937 and headquartered in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Bell Telephone Company can refer to: The Bell System, a name and trademark formerly given to AT&T. Bell Canada Bell Telephone Manufacturing Company, a former company in Antwerp (Belgium), now part of Alcatel The original Bell Telephone Company was founded in 1878 by Alexander Graham Bells father in... The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the worlds largest not-for-profit educational and scientific organizations. ... Jeffrey R. Immelt (born February 19, 1956) is the current chairman of the board and chief executive officer of General Electric. ... This article is about the American company. ... Richard Meyer Levy is the dwarf-like Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Varian Medical Systems, a billion dollar corporation headquartered in Palo Alto, California. ... Varian Medical Systems NYSE: VAR is engaged in designing and manufacturing advanced equipment and software solutions for treating cancer with radiation, as well as x-ray tubes for original equipment manufacturers, replacement x-ray tubes and flat-panel digital subsystems for imaging in medical, scientific and industrial applications. ... John Lord, (1810-94) was an American historian and lecturer, born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire He graduated from Dartmouth in 1833 and then entered the Andover Theological Seminary, where in his second year he wrote a series of lectures on the Dark Ages, which he delivered the next fall during... Kevin McGrath is President and CEO of Digital Angel Corporation. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Digital Angel (AMEX:DOC) is an American company that produces animal identification and tracking systems using RFID. It also tracks aircraft. ... Ken Novack, a Dartmouth College alumnus, is an American lawyer who currently sits on the board of BBN Technologies and is a special advisor to General Catalyst Partners. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Dr. Thomas Okarma is the current CEO of Geron Corporation, a biotechnology company. ... Geron Corporation is a biotechnology company founded by Dr. Michael West that is based in Menalo Park, California. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... T.J. Rodgers is the founder of Cypress Semiconductor. ... Cypress Semiconductor began operations in 1982 and listed publicly in 1986. ... L. William Seidman is an American economist and financial commentator. ... Edward P. (Skip) Stritter, engineer and entrepreneur, was the chief architect of the Motorola 68000 CPU[1] (used in the original Apple Computer Macintosh), a co-founder of the first commercial RISC company MIPS [2], the founder of Clarity Wireless[1][2] (acquired by Cisco Systems for $157 million[3... MIPS may mean: MIPS architecture, a RISC microprocessor architecture. ... The Motorola 68000 is a 32-bit CISC microprocessor core designed and marketed by Freescale Semiconductor (formerly Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector). ... CPU can stand for: in computing: Central processing unit in journalism: Commonwealth Press Union in law enforcement: Crime prevention unit in software: Critical patch update, a type of software patch distributed by Oracle Corporation in Macleans College is often known as Ash Lim. ... Apple Inc. ... The Macintosh 128K, the first Macintosh computer The iMac, a current Mac computer Macintosh is a brand name which covers several lines of personal computers designed, developed, and marketed by Apple Inc. ... Grant Tinker (born January 11, 1925) is the former chairman and CEO of NBC from 1981 to 1986, co-founder of MTM Enterprises, and television producer. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Edward Tuck (August 24, 1842 - April 30, 1938) was an American banker and philanthropist. ... Portrait of Amos Tuck Amos Tuck (1810-1879) was a political figure in New Hampshire, credited by some New Hampshire sources as a founder of the Republican Party. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...

Entertainment

Name Class year Notability Reference
Harry Ackerman 1935 Television producer [90]
David Benioff 1992 Screenwriter, known for novel and film 25th Hour and Troy [91]
Walter Bernstein 1940 Writer and screenwriter [92]
Paul Binder 1963 Juggler, co-creator of the Big Apple Circus [93]
David Birney 1961 Actor [91]
Jennifer Bransford 1990 Actress on General Hospital [94]
Connie Britton 1989 Actress; best known for Spin City [91]
Sarah Wayne Callies 1999 Actress; best known for Prison Break [91]
Rachel Dratch 1988 Actress, cast member of Saturday Night Live [91]
Alison Fanelli 2002
(Masters of Science)
Actress on The Adventures of Pete & Pete [95]
Buck Henry 1951 Actor, writer, director; shared Oscar nomination for screenplay for The Graduate [96]
Mindy Kaling 2001 Actress, writer and actress on The Office [97]
Bob Keeshan 1942
(honorary)
Producer of and main character on Captain Kangaroo [98][99]
Sam Means 2003 Staff writer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart [100]
Chris Miller 1963 Writer for the National Lampoon, co-writer of the screenplay for Animal House (based loosely on his experiences at Dartmouth) [101]
Michael Moriarty 1963 Actor, winner of three Emmy Awards, known for playing Benjamin Stone on Law & Order [91]
Peter Parnell 1974 Playwright and screenwriter [102]
Jean Passanante 1974 Head Writer of As the World Turns from May 2005-Present. Won Writer's Guild of America Award in 2007. [103]
W. D. Richter 1968 Director of The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension [104][105]
Shonda Rhimes 1991 Screenwriter, director, and producer; best known for producing Grey's Anatomy [106]
Fred Rogers 1950 Attended 1946-48 before transferring to Rollins College; creator of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood [107]
Budd Schulberg 1936 Screenwriter, winner of the Academy Award for On the Waterfront (best original screenplay) [108]
Andrew Shue 1989 Actor, best known for Melrose Place [109]
Roger L. Simon 1964 Novelist, screenwriter, nominated for an Academy Award for co-writing the screenplay for Enemies, a Love Story [110]
Scott Smith 1987 Screenwriter for A Simple Plan (Academy Award nomination, 1998) [111]
Herbert F. Solow 1953 Producer, director, studio executive, talent agent, and writer [112]
Meryl Streep (exchange student) Actress [113]
Seth Swirsky 1982 Pop songwriter and author [114] [115]
Josh Taylor Actor on Days of our Lives [116]
Aisha Tyler 1992 Actress, winner of the NAACP Image Award, portrayed Charlie Wheeler on Friends [91]
Bob Varsha 1973 Auto racing commentator, SPEED Channel [117]
Pat Weaver 1930 Pioneering television executive, creator of The Today Show and The Tonight Show, Emmy Award winner [118]
Brian J. White Actor as well as professional football and lacrosse player [119]
Jerry Zaks 1967 Tony Award-winning Broadway director and actor [120][121]

Harry Ackerman (November 17, 1912 in Albany, New York - February 3, 1991 in Burbank, California) was a famed TV executive producer at Screen Gems, the television division of Columbia Pictures. ... David Benioff (born circa 1970 in New York City) is an American writer. ... 25th Hour is a 2002 Spike Lee film based on David Benioffs novel The 25th Hour. ... Troy is a movie released on May 14, 2004 about the Trojan War, which is described in Homers Iliad and other Greek myths as having taken place in Anatolia (modern Turkey) around the 13th or 12th century BC. It stars, among others: Brad Pitt as Achilles, Eric Bana as... Walter Bernstein (August 20, 1919 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Paul Binder (born c. ... Juggling can refer to all forms of artful or skillful object manipulation. ... The Big Apple Circus is a circus that is located in New York City. ... As Senator Letant in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Jennifer Bransford (born December 2, 1968) is an American actress. ... General Hospital (commonly abbreviated GH) is the longest-running daytime American serial broadcast on the American Broadcasting Company television network. ... Connie Britton (Born: 6 March 1968) is an American actress who is most well-known for her role as Sharon Gaines in Friday Night Lights starring opposite Billy Bob Thornton and as Nikki Faber on ABCs Spin City from 1996-2000. ... Spin City was an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ... Sarah Wayne Callies (born June 1, 1977) is an American actress who currently has a starring role as Dr. Sara Tancredi in the successful American television drama Prison Break. ... Prison Break is an American serial drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on August 29, 2005. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90 minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Alison Fanelli (born April 26, 1979 in Northport, New York) is an American actress who is best known for the role of Ellen Josephine Hickle on the TV series The Adventures of Pete & Pete. ... The Adventures of Pete & Pete was a U.S. television series produced and broadcast by the Nickelodeon cable channel. ... Buck Henry Zuckerman (born December 9, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American actor, writer and director, best known for his work in television, film, comedy, and satire. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For the American rock band, see The Graduate (band). ... Mindy Kaling on The Office Mindy Kaling is an American actress and scriptwriter best known for her work on the television show The Office, on which she plays the bubbly Kelly Kapoor. ... The Office is an Emmy Award and Peabody Award-winning[1] American television comedy that debuted on NBC as a midseason replacement on March 24, 2005. ... Robert James Keeshan (June 27, 1927 – January 23, 2004) was an actor who was the original Clarabell the Clown on the Howdy Doody television program, but who is most famous as the star and title character of the childrens show Captain Kangaroo. ... Captain Kangaroo was a childrens television series which aired weekday mornings on the American television network CBS from 1955 until 1984, then moved to the American Program Service (now American Public Television, Boston) to air syndicated reruns of past episodes in 1992. ... Sam Means is an Emmy-winning staff writer for The Daily Show With Jon Stewart and a cartoonist for The New Yorker. ... Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart on the set of The Daily Show The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, also known as TDS to fans and staffers) is a half-hour satirical fake news program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network in... Chris Miller (born 1942) is an American screenwriter, most notable for his work on National Lampoon magazine and Animal House (he also had a bit part as Curtis Wayne Hardbar Fuller and was credited as Christian Miller). ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... The Deltas in front of their house Movie poster of Animal House National Lampoons Animal House (also called Animal House) is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of Delta fraternity boys takes on the system at their college. ... Michael Moriarty (born April 5, 1941) is a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning American actor. ... An Emmy Award. ... Ben Stone was a fictional character on the TV drama Law & Order, portrayed by Michael Moriarty. ... Law & Order is a long-running American television police procedural and legal drama set in New York City. ... Peter Parnell (b. ... Jean Passanante is an American television writer best known for her work in daytime soap operas. ... As the World Turns (ATWT) is the second longest-running American television soap opera (the first being Guiding Light),[1] airing each weekday on CBS. Set in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, the show debuted on Monday, April 2, 1956[2] at 1:30pm. ... W. D. Richter (born December 7, 1945) is a screenwriter and has occasionally directed and produced. ... The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension! (sometimes just Buckaroo Banzai) is a science fiction film that has reached cult film status. ... Shonda Rhimes (born January 13, 1970 in Chicago, Illinois) is a screenwriter, director and producer. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Reverend Frederick McFeely Fred Rogers (March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003) was an American educator, minister, songwriter and television host. ... Rollins College is an institution of higher learning located in Winter Park, Florida. ... Mister Rogers Neighborhood or Mister Rogers is an American childrens television series that was created and hosted by Fred Rogers. ... Picture of writer Budd Schulberg (born March 27, 1914 in New York City, New York) is an American screenwriter and novelist. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Andrew Shue (born February 20, 1967 in Wilmington, Delaware USA) is an actor, best known for his role on Melrose Place (1992–1998). ... Melrose Place is an American primetime soap opera that ran between 1992 and 1999, created by Darren Star for the FOX network. ... Roger Lichtenberg Simon is a mystery author, blogger and screenwriter living in California. ... Enemies, a Love Story is a 1989 film directed by Paul Mazursky, based on the novel Enemies, a Love Story (Yiddish: ) by Isaac Bashevis Singer. ... Scott Smith Scott Smith is an American author and screenwriter and is a graduate of Columbia University. ... Herbert F. Solow has worked in Hollywood as a producer, director, production manager, talent agent, and writer. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Seth Swirsky (born August 5, 1960 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American pop songwriter, author, recording artist and renowned baseball memorabilia collector. ... Josh Taylor in an undated publicity photo for Days of Our Lives. ... Days of our Lives is an American soap opera, which has aired nearly every weekday since November 8, 1965[2] on the NBC network in the United States, and has since been syndicated to many countries around the world. ... Aisha Tyler (born September 18, 1970 in San Francisco, California) is an American actress, stand-up comedian and occasional writer. ... The NAACP Image Award is an award presented annually by the NAACP to honor the top African-Americans in film, television, music and literature. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... Varsha (left) with fellow Formula One commentator David Hobbs at the 2005 United States Grand Prix Bob Varsha (born April 21, 1951 in Northport, New York) is probably the most famous on-air personality for SPEED Channel. ... Sylvester Pat Weaver (December 21, 1908 - March 17, 2002) was the father of actress Sigourney Weaver. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... Brian J. White is an American actor. ... Jerry Zaks is a director and actor born in Stuttgart, Germany on 7 September, 1946. ...

Government, law, and public policy

Note: individuals who belong in multiple sections appear in the first relevant section.

Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States

Name Class year Notability Reference
Salmon P. Chase 1826 Chief Justice of the United States, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Senator from Ohio [122]
Levi Woodbury 1809 Supreme Court Justice, Senator from New Hampshire, Governor of New Hampshire, U.S. Secretary of the Navy, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury [123]

Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ...

Members of the United States Congress

Over 164 Dartmouth graduates have served in the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.[124] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ...

Name Class year Notability Reference
Sherman Adams 1920 Representative from New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire [124]
Samuel Clesson Allen 1794 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Henry Baker 1863 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Perkins Bass 1934 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Charles F. Bass 1974 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Charles Henry Bell 1844 Senator from New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire [124]
Samuel Bell 1847 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Frank S. Black 1875 Representative from New York and Governor of New York [124]
John Blanchard 1812 Representative from Pennsylvania [124]
Daniel Buck 1807 Representative from Vermont [124]
Henry Burnham 1865 Senator from New Hampshire [124]
Robert Burns 1811 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Mike Capuano 1973 Representative from Massachusetts [125]
Dudley Chase 1791 Senator from Vermont; Anti-Jacksonian, uncle of Salmon P. Chase [124]
Daniel Chipman 1788 Representative from Vermont; professor of law at Middlebury College [124]
Martin Chittenden 1789 Representative from Vermont and Governor of Vermont [124]
Rufus Choate 1819 Senator and Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Daniel Clark 1834 Senator from New Hampshire, served as President pro tempore of the Senate [124]
Frank Clarke 1873 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
James Hodge Codding 1871 Representative from Pennsylvania [124]
Edward Curtis 1821 Representative from New York [124]
Judah Dana 1795 Senator from Maine [124]
Benjamin Dean 1845 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Nelson Dingley, Jr. 1955 Representative from Maine and Governor of Maine [124]
Samuel Dinsmoor 1789 Representative from New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire [124]
Edwin Dooley 1926 Representative from New York [124]
Fred J. Douglas 1895 Representative from New York [124]
Irving Drew 1870 Senator from New Hampshire [124]
Allen Ertel 1958 Representative from Pennsylvania [124]
T. A. D. Fessenden 1845 Representative from Maine [124]
Peter Fitzgerald 1982 Senator from Illinois [124]
Isaac Fletcher 1808 Representative from Vermont [124]
Richard Fletcher 1806 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
George Fogg 1839 Senator from New Hampshire [124]
Sylvester Gilbert 1775 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Kirsten Gillibrand 1988 Representative-elect from New York, first Dartmouth alumna in Congress [126]
Calvin Goddard 1786 Representative from Connecticut [124]
John Noble Goodwin 1844 Representative from Maine, delegate from Arizona [124]
Slade Gorton 1950 Senator from Washington [124]
James W. Grimes 1836 Senator from Iowa and Governor of Iowa [124]
Frank Joseph Guarini 1946 Representative from New Jersey [124]
Winfield Scott Hammond 1884 Representative from Minnesota and Governor of Minnesota [124]
Matthew Harvey 1806 Representative from New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire [124]
Arthur Healey 1913 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Paul Hodes 1972 Representative from New Hampshire [127]
Henry Hubbard 1803 Senator and Representative from New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire [124]
Jonathan Hunt 1807 Representative from Vermont [124]
Luther Jewett 1795 Representative from Vermont [124]
Jay Le Fevre 1918 Representative from New York [124]
John Locke 1792 Senator from Massachusetts [124]
Asa Lyon 1790 Representative from Vermont [124]
Clark MacGregor 1944 Representative from Minnesota [124]
Charles Marsh 1786 Representative from Vermont [124]
George Perkins Marsh 1820 Representative from Vermont, Minister to Turkey and Italy [124]
Gilman Marston 1837 Senator and Representative from New Hampshire [124]
David Thomas Martin 1929 Representative from Nebraska [124]
Ebenezer Mattoon 1776 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Samuel W. McCall 1874 Representative from Massachusetts and Governor of Massachusetts [124]
Thomas J. McIntyre 1937 Senator from New Hampshire [124]
Hugh Mitchell 1930 Senator and Representative from Washington [124]
John S. Monagan 1933 Representative from Connecticut [124]
George H. Moses 1890 Senator from New Hampshire, Minister to Greece and Montenegro [124]
Jeremiah Nelson 1790 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Moses Norris 1828 Senator and Representative from New Hampshire [124]
John Noyes 1795 Representative from Vermont [124]
Benjamin Orr 1798 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Albion K. Parris 1806 Senator and Representative from Maine [124]
James W. Patterson 1848 Senator and Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Rob Portman 1979 Representative from Ohio [124]
Redfield Proctor 1851 Senator from Vermont and Governor of Vermont [124]
Ambrose Ranney 1844 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Eleazar Wheelock Ripley 1800 Representative from Louisiana [124]
Erastus Root 1793 Representative from New York [124]
Jonathan Ross 1851 Senator from Vermont [124]
Ether Shepley 1811 Senator from Maine [124]
John Sherburne 1776 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Don Sherwood 1963 Representative from Pennsylvania [124]
Henry P. Smith III 1933 Representative from New York [124]
Thaddeus Stevens 1814 Representative from Pennsylvania; drafted 14th Amendment; leader of the Radical Republicans during Reconstruction [124]
Samuel Taggart 1774 Representative from New Hampshire [124]
Nathaniel Terry 1786 Representative from Connecticut [124]
Samuel Thurston 1843 First delegate from the Oregon Territory to the United States Congress [124]
Andrew Tracy 1821 Representative from Vermont [124]
Paul Tsongas 1962 Senator and Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Amos Tuck 1835 Representative from New Hampshire, cofounder of the Republican Party [124]
Douglas Walgren 1962 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Daniel Webster 1801 Senator from Massachusetts, Representative from New Hampshire, and Secretary of State [124]
John Wentworth 1836 Representative from Illinois, editor of the Chicago Democrat, a two-term mayor of Chicago, Illinois [124]
Leonard Wilcox 1817 Senator from New Hampshire [124]
George Fred Williams 1872 Representative from Massachusetts [124]
Hezekiah Williams 1820 Representative from Maine [124]
Phineas White 1797 Representative from Vermont [124]

Llewelyn Sherman A. Adams (July 8, 1899-October 27, 1986) was a United States politician, best known as White House Chief of Staff for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the culmination of a relatively short (18-year) political career that also included a stint as Governor of New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Samuel Clesson Allen (January 5, 1772–February 8, 1842) was a U.S. politician from Massachusetts during the first third of the 19th century. ... Henry Baker (May 8, 1698 - May 8, 1774) was an English naturalist. ... Perkins Bass (born October 6, 1912) is a former elected official from the U.S. state of New Hampshire, including four terms as a U.S. Representative from 1955 to 1963. ... Charles Foster Bass (born January 8, 1952) is a member of the United States House of Representatives for the second district of New Hampshire. ... Charles Henry Bell (November 18, 1823–November 12, 1893) was an American lawyer and Republican politician from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Samuel Bell (February 9, 1770–December 23, 1850) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from Chester, New Hampshire. ... Frank Swett Black (March 8, 1853 - March 22, 1913) is a Governor and a Representative from New York. ... NY redirects here. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... John Blanchard (b. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Daniel Buck (November 9, 1753 - August 16, 1816) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Henry Eben Burnham (November 8, 1844 - February 8, 1917 was a United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ... Michael Everett Mike Capuano (born January 9, 1952) is an American politician and Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the 8th District of Massachusetts (map). ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Dudley Chase (December 30, 1771-February 23, 1846) was a United States Senator from Vermont. ... Daniel Chipman (October 22, 1765 - April 23, 1850) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Martin Chittenden (March 12, 1763–September 5, 1840) was Governor of Vermont during a crucial portion of the War of 1812. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... Rufus Choate Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799–July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Daniel Clark Daniel Clark (October 24, 1809 - January 2, 1891) was an American politician who served in the New Hampshire legislature and the United States Senate. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Frank James Clarke (born 15 July 1942) is the eldest of five brothers who played in the English Football League. ... James Hodge Codding (July 8, 1849–September 12, 1919) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... Edward Curtis circa 1889 From left to right are: Elizabeth M. Curtis (1896-1973) aka Beth Curtis; Harold Curtis (1894-?); Clara J. Phillips (1874-1932); and Florence Curtis (1899-?) circa 1905-1909 The North American Indian, 1907 New York Times on April 16, 1911 In the Land of the Head... Judah Dana (April 25, 1772–December 27, 1845) was a Maine statesman and U.S. Senator. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Benjamin Dean Benjamin Dean (August 22, 1824 – April 9, 1897) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. ... Nelson Dingley, Jr. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... Samuel Dinsmor (July 1, 1766– March 15, 1835) was an American teacher, lawyer and politician from Keene, New Hampshire. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Edwin Benedict Dooley (April 13, 1905 - January 25, 1982) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. ... Fred James Douglas (September 14, 1869 - January 1, 1949) was a United States Representative from New York. ... Irving Webster Drew (January 8, 1845 - April 10, 1922) was a United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Allen Edward Ertel (Born November 7, 1937) was a Democrat member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Amory Deblois Fessenden (January 23, 1826–September 28, 1868) was a U.S. Representative from Maine and brother of Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden and congressman Samuel C. Fessenden. ... Peter G. Fitzgerald (born October 20, 1960) was the junior United States Senator from Illinois from 1999 until 2005. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Isaac Fletcher (November 22, 1784 - October 19, 1842) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Richard Fletcher (1768-1813) was an engineer in the British Army. ... George Gilman Fogg (May 26, 1813 - October 5, 1881) was a United States Senator and diplomat from New Hampshire. ... Sylvester Gilbert (October 20, 1755 - January 2, 1846) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... Kirsten Rutnik Gillibrand (born December 9, 1966) is a Democratic politician, elected on November 7, 2006, to represent New Yorks 20th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. ... Calvin Goddard (July 17, 1768 - May 2, 1842) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... John Noble Goodwin (October 18, 1824 – April 29, 1887) was a United States politician. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Slade Gorton Thomas Slade Gorton III (born January 8, 1928) is an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... James Wilson Grimes (October 20, 1816 – February 7, 1872), born in Deering, New Hampshire, was an American politician, serving as the Whig governor of and senator from Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... This is a list of Governors of Iowa: See also Iowa Iowa Territory Governors of Iowa Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Iowa ... GUARINI, Frank Joseph, Jr. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Winfield Scott Hammond (November 17, 1863 – December 30, 1915) was an American politician. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... Matthew Harvey (June 21, 1781–April 7, 1866) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from Hopkinton, New Hampshire. ... Arthur Daniel Healey (1889-1948) of Somerville, Massachusetts was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts from 1933, until he resigned in 1942. ... Paul Hodes is an attorney from the state of New Hampshire who formerly served at the Shaheen & Gordon Law Firm. ... Henry Hubbard (May 3, 1784–June 5, 1857) was an American lawyer and politician from Charlestown, New Hampshire. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... This article is about the former Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives. ... Luther Jewett (December 24, 1772 - March 8, 1860) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Jay Le Fevre (September 6, 1893 - April 26, 1970) was a United States Representative from New York. ... John Locke (1764—1855), was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. ... Asa Lyon (December 31, 1763 - April 4, 1841) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Clark MacGregor (July 12, 1922 – February 10, 2003) was U.S. Representative from Minnesota 3rd District (1961 - 1971). ... Othniel Charles Marsh (October 29, 1831 _ March 18, 1899) was one of the pre-eminent paleontologists of the 19th century, who discovered and named many fossils found in the American West. ... George Perkins Marsh (March 15, 1801 – July 23, 1882), an American diplomat and philologist, is considered by some to be Americas first environmentalist. ... Gilman Marston (August 20, 1811 – July 3, 1890) was a United States Representative, Senator, and United States Army general from New Hampshire. ... David Thomas Martin (July 9, 1907 – May 15, 1997) was a Republican politician from western Nebraska who served three terms in the United States House of Representatives from 1961 to 1974. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Samuel Walker McCall (February 28, 1851 - November 4, 1923) was Governor of Massachusetts. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Thomas James McIntyre (February 20, 1915 - August 8, 1992) was a U.S. senator from New Hampshire (1962-1979). ... Hugh Burnton Mitchell (22 March 1907-10 June 1996), an American politician, served as a member of the United States Senate from 1945 to 1946 and as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1949 to 1953. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... John S. Monagan (December 23, 1911-October 23, 2005) was a Connecticut politician and author. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Categories: Stub | 1869 births | 1944 deaths | United States Senators ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Moses Norris Jr. ... Insert non-formatted text hereJohn Humphrey Noyes (September 3, 1811 – April 13, 1886) was a U.S. utopian. ... Benjamin Orr (1772–1828) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts. ... Albion Keith Parris (January 19, 1788–February 11, 1857) was an American politician and jurist of Maine. ... James Willis Patterson (July 2, 1823 - May 4, 1893) was a United States Representative and Senator from New Hampshire. ... Robert Jones Rob Portman (born December 19, 1955) is an American lawyer and a former Director of the Office of Management and Budget. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Redfield Proctor (June 1, 1831–March 4, 1908) was an American politician in the Republican Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Eleazer Wheelock Ripley (1782-1839) , was a graduate of Dartmouth College, distinguished Brigadier General in the War of 1812, and later Louisiana legislator. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Erastus Root was an American politician from New York. ... Jonathan Ross (April 30, 1826 - February 23, 1905) was a United States Senator from Vermont. ... Ether Shepley (November 2, 1789—1877) was an American politician. ... John Samuel Sherburne (1757–August 2, 1830) was a lawyer, jurist, and politician from Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... For other persons of the same name, see Don Sherwood (disc jockey). ... Henry P. Smith III (September 29, 1911 - October 1, 1995) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. ... Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792 - August 11, 1868), also known as The Great Commoner, was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Amendment XIV in the National Archives The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (Amendment XIV) is one of the post-Civil War amendments (known as the Reconstruction Amendments), intended to secure rights for former slaves. ... Radical Republicans were certain Republicans in Congress and other federal and state leaders during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras in U.S. history. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Nathaniel Terry (January 30, 1768 - June 14, 1844) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... Samuel Royal Thurston (April 17, 1815 – April 6, 1851) was an American pioneer, lawyer and politician. ... The Oregon Territory is the name applied both to the unorganized Oregon Country claimed by both the United States and Britain, as well as to the organized U.S. territory formed from it that existed between 1848 and 1859. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Andrew Tracy (December 15, 1797 - October 28, 1868) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... Portrait of Amos Tuck Amos Tuck (1810-1879) was a political figure in New Hampshire, credited by some New Hampshire sources as a founder of the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Douglas Walgren (Born December 28, 1940) was a Democrat member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: John Wentworth (mayor) Long John Wentworth. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Chicago Democrat was the first newspaper in Chicago, Illinois. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Leonard Wilcox (January 29, 1799 - June 18, 1850) was a United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... George Fred Williams (July 10, 1852–July 11, 1932) was a Democratic U.S. congressman from Massachusetts, and later the minister to Greece and then Montenegro. ... Hezekiah Williams (July 28, 1798 - October 23, 1856) was a United States Representative from Maine. ... Phineas White (October 30, 1770 - July 6, 1847) was a United States Representative from Vermont. ...

United States governors

Name Class year Notability Reference
John Ball 1820 Governor of Michigan [128]
John H. Bartlett 1894 Governor of New Hampshire [129]
Fred H. Brown 1903 Governor of New Hampshire [130]
Channing H. Cox 1901 Governor of Massachusetts [131]
Moody Currier 1834 Governor of New Hampshire [132]
Lane Dwinell 1928 Governor of New Hampshire [133]
John Hoeven 1979 Governor of North Dakota [134]
Angus King 1966 Governor of Maine [135]
John Kitzhaber 1969 Governor of Oregon [136]
John R. McKernan, Jr. 1970 Governor of Maine [137]
Noah Martin 1824
(DMS)
Governor of New Hampshire [138]
Ralph Metcalf 1823 Governor of New Hampshire [139]
Walter R. Peterson, Jr. 1947 Governor of New Hampshire [140]
Nelson Rockefeller 1930 Governor of New York, Vice President of the U.S. [141]
Robert W. Straub 1943 Governor of Oregon [142]

John Ball (November 12, 1794–February 5, 1884) was born at Tenny Hill, Grafton County, New Hampshire. ... Michigan Governors Territorial Governors State Governors From statehood until the election of 1966, governors were elected to two-year terms. ... Official photo John Henry Bartlett (March 15, 1869–March 19, 1952) was an American teacher, lawyer, and Republican politician from Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Fred Herbert Brown (April 12, 1879–February 3, 1955) was an American lawyer and Democratic politician from Somersworth, New Hampshire. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... Channing Harris Cox (October 28, 1879 _ August 20, 1968) was a Massachusetts Republican politician and Governor born in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Moody Currier (April 22, 1806–August 23, 1898) was an American lawyer, banker, generous patron of the arts, and Republican politician from Manchester, New Hampshire. ... Official photo Lane Dwinell (November 14, 1906–March 27, 1997) was an American manufacturer and Republican politician from Lebanon, New Hampshire. ... John Hoeven (born March 13, 1957) has been the Governor of North Dakota since December 2000. ... The following is a list of governors of the state of North Dakota, United States. ... Angus King Angus S. King, Jr. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... John Kitzhaber (born March 5, 1947) is a physician and United States Democratic Party politician from Oregon. ... The Governor of Oregon is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of Oregon. ... John Rettie Jock McKernan, Jr. ... Noah Martin (July 26, 1801–May 8, 1863) was an American physician and politician from Dover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Ralph Metcalf (November 21, 1798–August 26, 1858) was an American lawyer and politician from Newport, New Hampshire. ... Official photo Walter Rutherford Peterson, Jr. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... Robert Bob Straub (May 6, 1920 - November 27, 2002), was a Democratic politician who served as Governor of Oregon from 1975 to 1979. ...

Ambassadors from the United States

Name Class year Notability Reference
Robert L. Barry 1956 Ambassador to Bulgaria and Indonesia [143][144]
James Cason 1966 Ambassador to Paraguay [145][144]
Robert C. Hill 1942 Ambassador to Costa Rica, El Salvador, Mexico, Argentina, Spain [146][144]
Alfred H. Moses 1951 Ambassador to Romania [144]
Laurence H. Silberman 1957 Ambassador to Yugoslavia [144]
Ronald I. Spiers 1950 Ambassador to Pakistan, Turkey, and the Bahamas [144]

Robert L. Barry is a career member of the United States Foreign Service and was the U.S. ambassador to Indonesia from 1992 to 1995; he also served as ambassador to Bulgaria. ... US Interest Section Chief in Cuba. ... Robert C. Hill (September 30, 1917 - November 28, 1978) was a United States diplomat who served as U.S. ambassador to several Latin American countries throughout his career. ... Alfred H. Moses (born 1929) is an American attorney and diplomat who served as the U.S. Ambassador to Romania. ... Judge Laurence H. Silberman was appointed United States Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in October 1985, and took senior status on November 1, 2000. ... Ronald Ian Spiers (born July 9, 1925), sometimes called Ron Spiers is a retired American ambassador and diplomat. ...

Government officials outside the U.S.

Name Class year Notability Reference
Gordon Campbell 1970 Thirty-fourth Premier of British Columbia [147]
Howard Hampton Leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party [148]
Paavo Lipponen (never graduated) Prime Minister of Finland [149]
Juan Carlos Navarro 1983 Mayor of Panama City [150]
William Remington 1939 Alleged Soviet spy [151]

Gordon Muir Campbell, BA, MBA, MLA (born January 12, 1948) is the 34th Premier of British Columbia. ... Categories: Stub | British Columbia premiers ... Ontario NDP Leader Howard Hampton Howard Hampton (born May 17, 1952) is the leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) and a Member of Provincial Parliament from the northern riding of Kenora—Rainy River. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ... Paavo Lipponen Paavo Tapio Lipponen (b. ... The Prime Minister (Finnish Pääministeri, Swedish: Statsminister) is the head of government in Finland. ... Juan Carlos Navarro is the mayor of Panamas District. ... Panama City (Spanish: Ciudad de Panamá), population 708,738, with a total metro population of 1,063,000 is the capital of Panama, located at the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal, at . ... William Remington with Soviet Spy Elizabeth Bentley William Walter Remington (October 25, 1917 - November 24, 1954) was a U.S. economist and civil servant whom the Venona transcripts confirm was a spy for Soviet Union[1]; he was later convicted on perjury charges. ...

Other U.S. political and legal figures

Name Class year Notability Reference
Daniel Adams 1779 State legislator in Massachusetts [152]
Amos T. Akerman 1842 United States Attorney General, 1870-1872 [153]
Joel Barlow 1778 American consul to Algiers [154]
Rand Beers 1964 Counter-terrorism adviser on the National Security Council [155]
George Hutchins Bingham 1887 Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit [156]
John C. Carney, Jr. 1978 Lieutenant Governor of Delaware [157]
Elaine Chao (exchange student) Current U.S. Secretary of Labor [158]
Harrie B. Chase 1909 Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit [159]
Ronald Chen 1980 Public Advocate of the State of New Jersey [160]
Ed Clark 1952 Libertarian candidate for President of the United States in 1980 [161]
William Eaton 1790 Consul to Tunis, hero of the First Barbary War [162]
James V. Forrestal 1915 U.S. Secretary of Defense [163]
Kristin Gillibrand 1989 NY-20, Freshman Congresswoman, 110th [164]
Hillary Goodridge 1979 Lead plaintiff in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, the landmark court case legalizing same-sex marriage in Massachusetts [165]
Peter Hutchinson 1971 Minnesota politician, unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Minnesota in 2006 [166][167]
Thomas Penfield Jackson 1958 U.S. District Judge in the Microsoft anti-trust case [168]
Thomas Kean, Jr. 1990 New Jersey politician, unsuccessful Senate candidate in 2006 [169]
C. Everett Koop 1937 Surgeon General of the United States (1982-1989) [170]
Quentin L. Kopp 1949 San Francisco and California state politician [171]
George Perkins Marsh 1820 American diplomat, philologist, and environmentalist [172]
Carl McCall 1958 New York State Comptroller, Deputy Representative to the U.N. (1979-1982) [173]
Rob Portman 1979 Director of the Office of Management and Budget [174]
Robert Reich 1968 President Bill Clinton's Secretary of Labor [175]
Peter Robinson 1979 Speechwriter for Ronald Reagan, composer of famous "Tear down this wall!" speech [176]
Jack Ryan 1981 Unsuccessful Senate candidate from Illinois [177]
Stuart O. Simms 1972 Unsuccessful candidate for Maryland Attorney General [178]
Diana Taylor 1977 New York Superintendent of Banks, companion of New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg [179]
Sterry R. Waterman 1922 Lawyer and federal judge from Vermont [180]
Michael A. Wolff 1967 Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri [181]

Daniel Adams (September 29, 1773-June 8, 1864) was a noted physician, author, and state legislator. ... Amos Tappan Akerman (February 23, 1821 - December 21, 1880) served as United States Attorney General under President Ulysses S. Grant from 1870-1872. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Joel Barlow (March 24, 1754-December 24, 1812), American poet and politician, born in Redding, Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... “Alger” redirects here. ... Rand Beers is a former American counterterrorism adviser who served on the National Security Council under U.S. Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... George H. Bingham, (1864-1949), graduated from Dartmouth College, 1887; Harvard Law School, 1891; began his legal practice with his father, George Azro Bingham, in Littleton, New Hampshire. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States District Courts: District of Maine District of Massachusetts District of New Hampshire District of Puerto Rico District of Rhode Island The court is based at the John Joseph... John C. Carney, Jr. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Harrie Brigham Chase (August 9, 1889 - November 17, 1969) was a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Ronald Chen is the Public Advocate of New Jersey. ... Public Advocate is a governmental position similar to an ombudsman. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Ed Clark was the Libertarian candidate for President of the United States in the 1980 presidential election. ... William Eaton (23 February 1764 – 1 June 1811) was a United States Army officer, involved with the First Barbary War. ... Combatants United States Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed and wounded uncertain Unknown The... James Vincent Forrestal (February 15, 1892–May 22, 1949) was a Secretary of the Navy and the first United States Secretary of Defense (1947 - 1949). ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Hillary Goodridge was the lead plaintiff in , the landmark 2003 legal decision which barred prohibitions against same-sex marriage in Massachusetts and effectively legalized them. ... Holding The denial of marriage licenses to same-sex couples violated provisions of the state constitution guaranteeing individual liberty and equality, and was not rationally related to a legitimate state interest. ... Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live together as a family. ... Peter Hutchinson (born December 17, 1949) is a candidate for the office of governor of Minnesota in the 2006 election. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... Thomas Penfield Jackson (born January 10, 1937) was a United States District Court Judge for the District of Columbia. ... Sen. ... C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Quentin Lewis Kopp (born 1928 in Syracuse, New York) served as a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, and as a member of the California State Senate from 1986-1998, representing Californias 8th Senatorial District, which included the northern portions of San Mateo County and southern portions... George Perkins Marsh (March 15, 1801 – July 23, 1882), an American diplomat and philologist, is considered by some to be Americas first environmentalist. ... H. Carl McCall (born 1935) is a former Comptroller of New York State and was the Democratic candidate in the 2002 election for state governor. ... Robert Jones Rob Portman (born December 19, 1955) is an American lawyer and a former Director of the Office of Management and Budget. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Peter Robinson was a speechwriter for US President Ronald Reagan who authored the sentence, Mr. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... U.S. President Ronald Reagan speaking in front of the Brandenburg Gate at the Berlin Wall. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Stuart O. Simms (Stu Simms) is a Maryland politician, who ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic Partys nomination in the 2006 election for Attorney General of the state of Maryland in the United States. ... Diana Taylor (born 1955) is the New York State Superintendent of Banks. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... Sterry Robinson Waterman (June 12, 1901 - February 12, 1984) was a lawyer and federal judge from Vermont. ... Michael A. Wolff is currently Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri. ... The Supreme Court of Missouri is the highest court in the state of Missouri. ...

Journalists and media personalities

Name Class year Notability Reference
Bill Beutel 1953 First anchor of what became Good Morning America [182]
Keith Boykin 1987 Co-host of the BET TV talk show My Two Cents [183]
Ty Burr 1980 Film critic for Boston Globe [184]
Vincent Canby Critic for the New York Times [185]
Robert Christgau 1962 Rock music critic, formerly of the Village Voice [186]
Dinesh D'Souza 1983 Political analyst, fellow at the Hoover Institution [187]
Nathaniel Fick 1999 Author of One Bullet Away and officer in the United States Marine Corps [188]
Gregory Fossedal 1981 Conservative activist and author, co-founder of The Dartmouth Review [189]
Paul Gambaccini 1970 Radio and television presenter in the United Kingdom [190]
Robert Hager 1960 NBC news analyst and correspondent [191]
George Herman 1941 Journalist for CBS, moderator for Face the Nation [192]
Evan X Hyde 1969 Publisher of Belize's newspaper Amandala [193]
Laura Ingraham 1986 Political analyst, host of radio show The Laura Ingraham Show [194]
Steve Kelley 1981 Political cartoonist for the New Orleans Times-Picayune [195] [196] [197]
Mort Kondracke 1960 Executive editor of Roll Call; political commentator and journalist, author of Saving Millie: Love, Politics, and Parkinson's Disease which was made into a movie for CBS [198]
A.J. Liebling 1924 Journalist, long-time contributor to The New Yorker [199]
James Nachtwey 1970 Photojournalist [200]
James Panero 1998 Managing Editor of The New Criterion [201]
Spencer Reiss 1974 Journalist for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired [202][203]
David Rosenbaum 1963 Journalist for The New York Times, winner of the 1991 Polk Award [204]
Jake Tapper 1991 Journalist for ABC [205]

Bill Beutel, born William Charles Beutel, Jr. ... Keith Boykin Keith Boykin is a former White House aide to President Clinton and a New York Times bestselling author of three books. ... Ty Burr has been a film critic for the Boston Globe since 2002. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... Robert Christgau (2007) Robert Christgau (sometimes abbreviated in print to Xgau), born April 18, 1942, is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics[1] His first reviews were published by Esquire in 1967. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Dinesh DSouza (born April 25, 1961 in Bombay, India) is an author and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. ... Hoover Tower at the Hoover Institution The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... Nathaniel Fick is a former United States Marine Corps officer who has gained fame for his writing on military life and the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. ... Gregory Fossedal is a conservative activist. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Paul Matthew Gambaccini (born April 2, 1949, New York) is a radio and television presenter in the United Kingdom. ... Robert Hager is an NBC News analyst and a former correspondent for the network. ... George Edward Herman (January 14, 1920 - February 8, 2005) was a veteran CBS journalist. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ... Evan Anthony Hyde (better known as Evan X Hyde) (born April 30, 1947 in Belize City, Belize) is a writer and journalist. ... Amandala is a Belizean newspaper; published twice weekly, it is considered the mostly widely circulated newspaper in Belize. ... Laura Anne Ingraham (born June 19, 1964 in Glastonbury, Connecticut) is an American conservative talk radio host and author. ... Steve Kelley is a syndicated political cartoonist. ... Morton M. Kondracke (born April 28, 1939) is an American political commentator and journalist. ... A.J. Liebling (October 18, 1904 - December 28, 1963) was an American journalist who was closely associated with The New Yorker from 1935 until his death. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... James Nachtwey (1948 - ) is one of the most influential photojournalists and war photographers of the late 20th century. ... James Panero (born 1975, New York City) is the managing editor of the New Criterion and former Editor-in-Chief of The Dartmouth Review. ... The New Criterion is a New York-based magazine, a journal of art and cultural criticism. ... Spencer Reiss (born New York 1952) is a former Newsweek foreign correspondent, now a contributing editor at Wired magazine. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... David Rosenbaum (March 1, 1942 – January 7, 2006) was an American journalist. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Jake Tapper is an American journalist. ...

Bloggers

Name Class year Blog Reference
John Hinderaker 1971 Power Line [206]
Scott W. Johnson 1971 Power Line [206]
Paul Mirengoff 1971 Power Line [206]
Melissa Lafsky 2000 Opinionistas [207]

John H. Hinderaker is a lawyer and a blogger at the Power Line weblog, as well as a fellow at the Claremont Institute. ... Power Line is a neoconservative blog run by three lawyers: John H. Hinderaker (Hindrocket), Scott W. Johnson (The Big Trunk) and Paul Mirengoff (Deacon). Power Line covers political and social issues from a conservative viewpoint. ... Scott W. Johnson is a lawyer and a blogger at Power Line. ... Power Line is a neoconservative blog run by three lawyers: John H. Hinderaker (Hindrocket), Scott W. Johnson (The Big Trunk) and Paul Mirengoff (Deacon). Power Line covers political and social issues from a conservative viewpoint. ... Paul Mirengoff (born April 17, 1949) is a lawyer and a blogger at the Power Line weblog. ... Power Line is a neoconservative blog run by three lawyers: John H. Hinderaker (Hindrocket), Scott W. Johnson (The Big Trunk) and Paul Mirengoff (Deacon). Power Line covers political and social issues from a conservative viewpoint. ... Melissa Lafsky Melissa Lafsky is the author of the formerly prominent Opinionistas blog, which focuses on the dehumanizing aspects of law firms. ...

Literature, writing, and translation

Name Class year Notability Reference
Philip Booth 1947 Poet, winner of Guggenheim grant [208]
William Bronk 1938 Poet, winner of American Book Award [209]
Joseph Campbell 1926
(never graduated)
Author of The Hero with a Thousand Faces, which inspired Star Wars and The Matrix [210]
Louise Erdrich 1976 Novelist, poet, winner of the O. Henry Award in 1987, Guggenheim Fellow, National Book Critics Circle Award [211]
Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) 1925 Children's author and illustrator [212]
Philip Babcock Gove 1922 Lexicographer and editor-in-chief of Webster's Third New International [213]
Richard Hovey 1885 Poet [214]
Richmond Lattimore 1926 Translator of the Iliad and other classics [215]
Gonzalo Lira 1995 Author of Acrobat and Tomáh Errázurih, writer/director of Catalina's Kidnapping [216]
Norman Maclean 1924 Author of A River Runs Through It and Young Men and Fire, winner of the National Book Award [217]
Gregory Rabassa 1944 Acclaimed translator of Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, Julio Cortázar's Hopscotch, and other major works of Latin American literature. [218]
Tara Bray Smith 1992 Writer, memoirist [219]
Thorne Smith Science fiction author [220]

Philip Booth, born in Hanover, New Hampshire in 1925, currently lives in the Maine house at which he spent much of his childhood. ... American poet, born 17 February 1918, died 22 February 1999. ... The American Book Award was established in 1978 by the Before Columbus Foundation. ... Joseph John Campbell (March 26, 1904 – October 31, 1987) was an American mythology professor, writer, and orator best known for his work in the fields of comparative mythology and comparative religion. ... The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949) is the seminal work of comparative mythologist Joseph Campbell. ... Star Wars is an epic science fantasy saga in the space opera genre and a fictional universe initially developed by George Lucas during the 1970s and expanded since that time. ... The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano and Hugo Weaving. ... Karen Louise Erdrich (born June 7, 1954) is a Native American (Chippewa) author of novels, poetry, and childrens books. ... The O. Henry Awards are yearly prizes given to short stories of exceptional merit. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... The National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) is an American association of approximately seven hundred book reviewers. ... Dr. Seuss is the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 - September 24, 1991). ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was a famous American writer and cartoonist best known for his classic childrens books under the pen name Dr. Seuss, including The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and One Fish Two Fish... Philip Babcock Gove (1902-1972) was an American lexicographer who was editor-in-chief of the controversial Websters Third New International Dictionary, published in 1961. ... 1888 advertisement for Websters Dictionary Websters Dictionary is the common title given to English language dictionaries in the United States, derived from American lexicographer Noah Webster. ... Richard Hovey (1864-1900) New York fostered if not produced one other important poet, Richard Hovey, who was born in 1864, when Gilder was a young man. ... Richmond Alexander Lattimore (May 6, 1906 - February 26, 1984) was an American poet and translator known for his translations of the Greek classics, especially his versions of the Iliad and Odyssey, still considered superior despite their age. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Gonzalo Lira (born February 29, 1968, in Burbank, California) is an American novelist and filmmaker. ... Tomáh Errázurih (Random House Mondadori, Santiago, Chile, 1997) (ISBN: 9-789562-580571) is a highly idiosyncratic, experimental Spanish language novel written by the American writer and filmmaker Gonzalo Lira. ... Norman Fitzroy Maclean (23 December 1902 in Clarinda, Iowa — 2 August 1990 in Chicago, Illinois) was an American author and scholar most noted for his books A River Runs Through It and Other Stories (1976) and Young Men and Fire (1992). ... A River Runs Through It and Other Stories is a semi-autobiographical novella by Norman Maclean (1902–1990). ... Young Men and Fire is a non-fiction book written by Norman Maclean and editted by his son, John Norman Maclean. ... Gregory Rabassa (b. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a novel by Nobel Prize winning Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that was first published in Spanish in 1967 (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana), with an English translation by Gregory Rabassa released in 1970 (New York: Harper and... Julio Cortázar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Tara Bray Smith was born and grew up in Hawaii, USA. She is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Columbia University, and now lives in New York state. ... Wikisource has original works written by or about: Thorne Smith Thorne Smith (1892–1934) was an American writer of fantasy fiction. ...

Pulitzer Prize winners

The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Name Class year Notability Reference
Thomas Burton 1971 Wall Street Journal reporter, winner of Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Journalism in 2004 [221]
Richard Eberhart 1926 U.S. poet laureate; winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1966 and the National Book Award in 1977 [222]
Robert Frost 1896
(never graduated)
U.S. poet laureate, winner of four Pulitzer Prizes [223]
Paul Gigot 1977 Wall Street Journal editorial page editor, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary [224]
Nigel Jaquiss 1984 Winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting [225]

Thomas Burton was a Loughborough wool merchant. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Journalism was first introduced in 1985, and continued under that name until 1997. ... Richard Ghormley Eberhart (April 5, 1904 – June 9, 2005) was a prolific American poet who published more than a dozen books of poetry and approximately twenty works in total. ... The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Paul A. Gigot is a Pulitzer Prize-winning conservative political commentator and the editor of the editorial pages for The Wall Street Journal. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Commentary has been awarded since 1970. ... Nigel Jaquiss (born 1962) is a journalist who won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, for his work exposing governor of Oregon Neil Goldschmidts alleged sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl while he was mayor of Portland, Oregon. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting has been awarded since 1953 for a distinguished example of investigative reporting by an individual or team, presented as a single article or series in print journalism. ...

Medicine

Name Class year Notability Reference
Frederick W. Adams 1822 Physician, author, and violin maker [226]
Charles Knowlton 1824
(DMS)
Physician, author of a noted pamphlet on birth control [227]
Bob Smith 1902 Cofounder of Alcoholics Anonymous [228]
Julian Whitaker 1966 Physician and practitioner of alternative medicine [229]

Frederick W. Adams (1786-December 17, 1858) was a noted physician, author, and violin maker. ... Charles Knowlton (May 10, 1800 - February 20, 1850) was an American physician and writer. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Bob Smith (Robert Holbrook Smith, b. ... Logo for AA Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal society for recovering alcoholics. ... Julian M. Whitaker, M.D. (b. ...

Religion

Name Class year Notability Reference
Jonathan Clarkson Gibbs 1852 Presbyterian minister [230]
Caleb Sprague Henry 1825 Protestant Episcopal clergyman and author [231]
Marshall Meyer 1952 Rabbi and human rights activist [232]
David E. Stern 1983 Head of largest Reform congregation in American Southwest, Temple Emanu-El in Dallas [233]
Solomon Spalding 1785 Calvinist clergyman, possibly the author of a predecessor work of the Book of Mormon [234]

Jonathan Clarkson Gibbs (1821 - 1874) was a Presbyterian minister and a prominent officeholder during Reconstruction. ... Caleb Sprague Henry (1804-84) was an American Protestant Episcopal clergyman and author. ... Marshall Meyer was an American-born Conservative rabbi and a recognized international human rights activist. ... For other uses of the word Solomon, see Solomon (Disambiguation) The Rev. ... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement, regarded by Latter Day Saints as divinely revealed, and named after the prophet–historian Mormon who, according to the text, compiled most of the book. ...

Social reforms

Name Class year Notability Reference
Lester Granger 1918 African-American civil rights activist [235]
John Humphrey Noyes 1830 Founder of the Utopian Oneida Society [236]
Charles A. Eastman 1887 Santee Sioux author, physician, and reformer [237]

Lester Blackwell Granger (b. ... John Humphrey Noyes (September 3, 1811 â€“ April 13, 1886) was a U.S. utopian. ... The Oneida Community was a utopian commune founded by John Humphrey Noyes in 1848 in Oneida, New York. ... Excerpt from the back cover of Indian Boyhood (1906): In this long-neglected classic, Charles Eastman, or Hakadah, recounts his first fifteen years of life among the Sioux during the waning years of the nineteenth century. ...

Sports

Name Class year Notability Reference
Gillian Apps 2006 Ice hockey player, gold medalist for Canada in the 2006 Winter Olympics [238]
Gerald Ashworth 1963 Track and field sprinter, gold medalist for the U.S. in the 1964 Olympics [239]
Brad Ausmus 1991 Baseball catcher, 1999 All-Star & 3-time Gold Glove winner [240]
Jim Beattie 1976 Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and the Seattle Mariners [241]
Walter Bush 1951 Ice hockey administrator and organizer [242]
Casey Cramer 2004 Football tight end for the Tennessee Titans [243]
Dick Durrance 1939 Skier, competitor for the U.S. in the 1936 Winter Olympics [244]
Jack Durrance 1936 Mountaineer, founder of Dartmouth Mountaineering Club [245]
Vilhjálmur Einarsson 1956 Track and field triple jumper, silver medalist for the U.S. in the 1956 Olympics [239]
Jay Fiedler 1994 Football quarterback for the Miami Dolphins [246]
Amos Foster 1904 College football coach [247]
Dave Gavitt 1959 Basketball coach at Providence College, first commissioner of the Big East Conference [248]
Andrew Goldstein 2005 Lacrosse goalie for the Long Island Lizards, first professional male team-sport athlete to be openly gay during career [249]
Russ Granik 1969 Basketball administrator, Deputy Commissioner and COO of the NBA [250]
Ed Healey 1919 Football player for the Chicago Bears [251]
Jeff Kemp 1980 Football quarterback in the NFL [252]
Kristin King 2002 Ice hockey player, bronze medalist for the U.S. in the 2006 Winter Olympics [253]
Myles Lane 1928 Ice hockey player for the New York Rangers and the Boston Bruins [254][255]
Rudy LaRusso 1959 Basketball player, five-time NBA All-Star [256]
Nick Lowery 1978 Football placekicker, 3-time NFL Pro Bowler [257]
Brian Mann 2002 Football quarterback in the Los Angeles Avengers [258]
Edwin Myers 1920 Track and field pole vaulter, bronze medalist for the U.S. in the 1920 Olympics [239]
Adam Nelson 1997 Track and field shotputter, silver medalist for the U.S. in the 2000 Olympics [259]
Sarah Parsons 2010 Ice hockey player, bronze medalist for the U.S. in the 2006 Winter Olympics [253][260]
Cherie Piper 2006 Ice hockey player, gold medalist for Canada in the 2002 and 2006 Olympics [261]
Mike Remlinger 1988 Baseball pitcher, 2002 MLB All-Star [262]
Red Rolfe 1931 Baseball third baseman for the New York Yankees [263]
Kyle Schroeder 2000
(Tuck 2007)
Football player for the Birmingham Thunderbolts (XFL) [264][265]
Arthur Shaw 1908 Track and field hurdler, bronze medalist for the U.S. in the 1908 Olympics [239]
Nathaniel Sherman 1910 Track and field sprinter, competitor for the U.S. in the 1908 Olympics [239]
David Shula 1981 Football wide receiver and coach [266]
Michael Slive 1962 Commissioner of the Southeastern Conference [267]
Gus Sonnenberg 1920 Football player and professional wrestler [268]
Lee Stempniak 2005 Ice hockey player for the St. Louis Blues [269]
Buddy Teevens 1979 Football player and current head coach for Dartmouth [270]
Earl Thomson 1917 Track and field hurdler, gold medalist for the U.S. in the 1920 Olympics [271]
Carolyn Treacy 2006 Biathlete in the 2006 Winter Olympics [253]
Sarah Tueting 1998 Ice hockey goalie, gold medalist for USA in the 1998 Winter Olympics, silver medalist for USA in 2002 Winter Olympics
Katie Weatherston 2006 Ice hockey player, gold medalist for Canada in the 2006 Winter Olympics [272]
Reggie Williams 1976 Football linebacker for the Cincinnati Bengals [273][274]
Marc Wright 1913 Track and field pole vaulter, silver medalist for the U.S. in the 1912 Olympics [239]

Gillian Mary Apps (born November 2, 1983 in Toronto, Ontario) is a womens ice hockey player. ... Gerald Howard Gerry Ashworth (born May 1, 1942) is a former American athlete, winner of the gold medal in the 4x100 m relay at the 1964 Summer Olympics. ... Bradley David Ausmus (born April 14, 1969, in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American 3-time Gold Glove Award winning catcher in Major League Baseball with the Houston Astros. ... James Louis Beattie (born July 4, 1954 in Hampton, Virginia), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1978-1986. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... Walter Bush (September 25, 1929 in Minneapolis was a American ice hockey administrator. ... Casey Cramer (born January 5, 1982) is an American football player for the Tennessee Titans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Richard Dick Durrance (October 14, 1914 - June 13, 2004) was an 17-time national championship skier and one of the first American skiiers to compete successfully with European skiiers. ... Dr. John R. Jack Durrance was a pioneering American rock climber and mountaineer. ... Vilhjálmur Einarsson (born on June 4, 1934) is an Icelandic former athlete, and triple-jump silver medalist at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. ... Jay Brian Fiedler (born December 29, 1971) is an American football quarterback, and is currently a free agent. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner H. Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... Amos Foster was an American football coach in the early 1900’s. ... David Dave Gavitt (b. ... Providence College is a Catholic college in Providence, Rhode Island, the states capital city. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... Image:Http://www. ... The Long Island Lizards are a professional Lacrosse team based in Uniondale, New York. ... Russ Granik is the Deputy Commissioner and COO of the NBA. He has served in that role for 22 years, and has worked for the NBA for 30 years in total. ... Edward Francis Healey, Jr. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue, Orange and White Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National... Jeffrey Allan Kemp (born July 11, 1959 in Santa Ana, California), was a former American professional football player. ... Kristin King (born July 21, 1979 in Piqua, Ohio) is an American ice hockey player. ... Myles Lane (b. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Rudolph A. LaRusso (November 11, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York - July 10, 2004 in Los Angeles, California) was a 5-time NBA All-Star. ... Nick Lowery (born May 27, 1956 in Munich, Germany) was an american football placekicker for the New England Patriots (1978), Kansas City Chiefs (1980-1993), and New York Jets (1994-1996). ... Brian Mann(Born:May 7,1980) is an Arena Football League quarterback for the Los Angeles Avengers. ... Conference American Division Western Year founded 2000 Home arena Staples Center City, State Los Angeles, California Head Coach Ed Hodgkiss ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 1: 2005 Wild Card berths 4: 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007 The Los Angeles Avengers is an Arena Football League (AFL) team based... Edwin Earl Myers (December 18, 1896 - August 1978) was an American athlete who competed in the mens pole vault. ... Adam Nelson is an elite American shotputter. ... Sarah Parsons (born July 27, 1987 in Dover, Massachusetts) is an American ice hockey player. ... Cherie Piper (born on June 29, 1981 in Toronto) is a Canadian ice hockey player residing in Markham, Ontario. ... Michael John Remlinger (born March 23, 1966 in Middletown, New York) is a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who is currently without a team after being released by th the Boston Red Sox. ... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Kyle Schroeder (January 18, 1978 –) was a XFL defensive tackle for the Birmingham Thunderbolts. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Only Season The Birmingham Thunderbolts were a short-lived springtime American football team based in Birmingham, Alabama. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arthur Briggs Shaw (28. ... Nathaniel Alden Sherman (born February 7, 1888, Boston, Massachusetts; died August 1954) was an American athlete. ... David Shula is an American football coach who was the head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals. ... Michael L. Slive is the current commissioner of the SEC. Michael Lawrence Slive (born July 26, 1940) (sometimes shortened to Mike Slive) is the current commissioner of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), an American college athletics association. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Gus Sonnenberg (March 6, 1898 - September 9, 1944) was an American football player, American wrestler, and a World War II veteran. ... Lee Stempniak, born February 4, 1983 in Buffalo, New York, is a professional ice hockey forward currently playing for the St. ... The St. ... Eugene Francis Teevens III or Buddy Teevens (born October 1, 1956 in Pembroke, Massachusetts) is the head football coach at Dartmouth College. ... Earl John Thomson (February 15, 1895 - April 19, 1971) was Canadian athlete, a specialist in the high hurdles. ... Carolyn Treacy is an athlete from Minnesota, USA. She has been nominated for the 2006 Winter Olympics biathlon team. ... The name biathlon is used to describe any sporting event made up of two disciplines, but usually the winter sport which combines cross_country skiing and rifle shooting is meant. ... Katie Weatherston (born April 6, 1983 in Thunder Bay, Ontario) is a womens ice hockey player. ... Reginald Williams (born September 19, 1954 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Other

Name Class year Notability Reference
Albert S. Bickmore 1860 Naturalist and cofounder of the American Museum of Natural History [275]
Stephen Harriman Long 1809 Explorer, surveyor and military officer [276]
James H. Newman 1978 Astronaut with NASA [277]
Steve Russell 1958 Computer programmer and gaming pioneer, creator of early video game Spacewar! [278]
Brian Sharp 2001 Computer game programmer, writer for Game Developer Magazine [279]

Albert Smith Bickmore (March 1, 1839–1914) was an American naturalist and one of the founders of the American Museum of Natural History. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stephen Harriman Long (December 30, 1784 - September 4, 1864) was a U.S. engineer, explorer, and military officer. ... Astronaut James H. Newman conducts an EVA from the Space Shuttle Discovery. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... Steve Russel created the first videogame, Spacewar at the Tech Model Railroad Club at the MIT. Categories: Substubs ... Spacewar! is one of the earliest video games for a digital computer. ... Brian Sharp (born March 3, 1980) is a computer game programmer. ... Game Developer magazine is a monthly periodical for the video game industry. ...

Fictional people

Name Class year Notability Reference
Stephen Colbert Titular character of The Colbert Report (real Colbert did not attend Dartmouth; the fictional biography on colbertnation.com, however, lists Dartmouth as his alma mater) [280]
Michael Corleone 1949 Character from The Godfather [281]
Thomas Crown Titular character of The Thomas Crown Affair [282]
Dr. Meredith Grey Titular character of Grey's Anatomy [283]
Trapper John McIntyre Character on M*A*S*H novels, film, and television, and Trapper John, M.D.
Dan Rydell Character on Sports Night [284]

The Colbert Report Comedian and actor Stephen Colbert (Pronounced: ) plays a semi-fictional character on his comedy television program The Colbert Report. ... The Colbert Report (IPA: ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... Michael Corleone (December 25, 1920 – December 29, 1997) is a fictional character in Mario Puzos novels, The Godfather and The Sicilian. ... The Godfather is a 1972 crime film based on the novel of the same name by Mario Puzo and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, with screenplay by Puzo and Coppola. ... The Thomas Crown Affair is a 1968 movie starring Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway. ... Information Gender Female Age late 20s-early 30s Occupation Surgical Resident at Seattle Grace Hospital Title M.D. Family Thatcher Grey (father) Dr. Ellis Grey (mother; deceased) Dr. Lexie Grey (half-sister) Molly Grey Thompson (half-sister) Relationships Dr. Derek Shepherd (boyfriend) Dr. Finn Dandridge (ex-boyfriend) Children None Relatives... This article is about the television series. ... For other uses, see John Macintyre. ... M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, the original novel that inspired the M*A*S*H movie and TV series, was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a U.S. mobile army surgical hospital in Korea during the Korean War. ... Trapper John, M.D. was a television series spinoff of the film M*A*S*H that ran on CBS from September 23, 1979 to September 4, 1986. ... Daniel Dan Rydell (born 1969) is one of the lead characters of the ABC dramedy Sports Night which lasted from 1998 until 2000. ... This article is about the American television series. ...

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Norwich University (NU) is a private university located in Northfield, Vermont. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Northwestern University (officially abbreviated NU; sometimes abbreviated NWU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... University of Montana The University of Montana campus, 1999. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Scripps College is a liberal arts womens college in Claremont, California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... William Jewell College is a private, four-year liberal arts college of 1,274 undergraduate students located in Liberty, Missouri. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... All Movie Guide is a commercial database of information about movie stars, movies and television shows. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network based in New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cigar Aficionado is an American magazine that is dedicated to the world of cigars. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Amandala is a Belizean newspaper; published twice weekly, it is considered the mostly widely circulated newspaper in Belize. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... “Bryn Mawr” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Amazon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2 is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Florida Times-Union, based in Jacksonville, Florida, USA, is the major daily newspaper in northeast Florida. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to be... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Category:Dartmouth College alumni

External links

  • Dartmouth Alumni Magazine
  • Dartmouth Office of Alumni Relations

 
 

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