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Encyclopedia > List of Byzantine Emperors

This is a list of the Emperors of the late Eastern Roman Empire, called Byzantine by modern historians. This list does not include numerous co-emperors who never attained sole or senior status as rulers. An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ...


This list begins with Constantine I the Great, the first Christian emperor reigning from Constantinople. Diocletian before him had ruled from Nicomedia and replaced the republican trappings of the office with a straightforward autocracy. All Byzantine Emperors regarded themselves as Roman Emperors.[1] Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... Nicomedia (modern İzmit, also known as Iznik) was founded by Nicomedes I of Bithynia at the head of the Gulf of Astacus (which opens on the Propontis) in 264 BC. The city has ever since been one of the chief towns in this part of Asia Minor. ...


The Emperor Heraclius (610-641) replaced Latin with Greek as the language of the army and began the administrative restructuring of the Empire into themata. Although he and his successors regarded themselves as Roman emperors, the reign of Heraclius marks a watershed or decisive break that marks the beginning of the Greek phase of the eastern Roman Empire. After 800 AD the claim to the Roman Empire was shared with the Holy Roman Empire. For the Patriarch of Jerusalem, see Patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem. ... The themata in 950. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


The title of all Emperors listed preceding Heraclius was officially Augustus, although various other titles such as Dominus were used as well. For official purposes, their names were preceded by Imperator Caesar and followed by Augustus. Following Heraclius, the title commonly became the Greek Basileus (Gr. Βασιλεύς), which had formerly meant generally "king", "sovereign" but now was used in place of Imperator. Kings were now titled by the neologism Regas (Gr. Ρήγας, from the Lat. "Rex") or by another generic term Archon (Gr. Άρχων, "ruler"). Autokrator (Gr. Αυτοκράτωρ) was also frequently used, along with a plethora of more hyperbolic titles including Kosmokrator (Gr.Κοσμοκράτωρ) ("Master of the World") and "Chronokrator" (Gr. Χρονοκράτωρ) ("Master of Time"). The emperors of the 15th century alone were often self-styled as Basileus ton Hellinon, "Emperor of the Greeks," though they still considered themselves "Roman" Emperors. For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Dominus has a number of uses: Peoples names: Mark Jason Dominus — a Perl programmer. ... The Latin word imperator was a title originally roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... A silver coin of the Seleucid king Antiochus I Soter. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... An autocrat is generally speaking any ruler with absolute power; the term is now usually used in a negative sense (cf. ...

Contents

Constantinian dynasty (306-363)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Constantine I "the Great"
(Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus)
son of the Augustus Constantius Chlorus 27 February c.280 25 July 306
Proclaimed "Augustus" upon the death of Constantius Chlorus
22 May 337 He declared himself "Augustus" in Eboracum, Brittannia (Modern York), upon the death of Constantius Chlorus, and, after a period of prolonged civil war, became sole Emperor. He famously converted to Christianity, and began imperial favour of that religion. He founded Constantinople as a capital of the Empire. Divided the Empire between his three sons upon his death. Later canonised.
Constantius II
(Flavius Iulius Constantius)
second son of Constantine I 7 August 317 22 May 337
Inherited Eastern third of Roman Empire upon his father's death
5 October 361
died of illness on campaign
By inheritance, he succeeded to the Eastern third; after his two brothers died, he became sole Emperor. He was responsible for the deaths of numerous family members in the wake of Constantine's death, and persecuted those remaining. His last cousin, Julian, rebelled against him in the last years of his life.
Julian "the Apostate"
(Flavius Claudius Iulianus)
grandson of Constantius Chlorus, cousin of Constantius II May 332 5 October 361
Proclaimed by his army in Gaul, became legitimate Emperor upon the death of Constantius
28 June 363
Mortally wounded in battle
The son of Constantine I's half brother, Julius Constantius, he was early orphaned by the death of his mother of childbed fever, and the murder of his father by the sons of Constantine I. Persecuted by Constantius II, he eventually rebelled, and seized control of parts of the empire. He succeeded to the entire empire after Constantius' fortuitous death of illness. He died on campaign against the Sassanids. He is more famous, however, for his rejection of Christianity, and his doomed attempts to rejuvenate Paganism.
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

Category: ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (538x858, 224 KB) Summary Head of the colossal marble statue of Constantine I, Musei Capitolini, Rome Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 07/10/2004 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Constantine I (emperor) Metadata This file contains additional... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... On the reverse of this argenteus struck in Antioch under Constantius Chlorus, the tetrarcs are sacrificing to celebrate a victory against the Sarmatians. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Chinese Jin Dynasty under Emperor Wu of Jin China unifies China by conquering the Kingdom of Wu, ending the Period of the Three Kingdoms. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 - Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans succeed their father Constantine I and rule as co-emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Jin Yuan Di succeeds Jin Min Di; end of the western and beginning of the eastern Jin Dynasty King Marian II of Iberia declares Christianity the official state religion Births February _ Constantine II, Roman Emperor Deaths Categories: 317 ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 - Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans succeed their father Constantine I and rule as co-emperors of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events Emperor Ai succeeds Emperor Mu as emperor of China. ... Image File history File links JulianusII-antioch(360-363)-CNG.jpg Description: Portret van Julianus Apostata op bronzen munt van Antiochië, 360-363. ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... For other uses, see May (disambiguation). ... Events Constantine the Great emperor of the Roman Empire, engaged the Visigoths in battle and was victorious. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events Emperor Ai succeeds Emperor Mu as emperor of China. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ... Flavius Julius Constantius (d. ...

Non-dynastic (363-364)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Jovian
( Flavius Claudius Iovianus )
Guards' Captain amongst Julian's Eastern forces c.332 28 June 363
Elected by the army upon Julian's death
17 February 364
Died on journey back to Constantinople
A non-entity, chosen by the army to succeed following Julian's intestate death. His only deeds worth mentioning were to secure the escape of the Roman army from Persia by signing a peace treaty; this treaty signed away Rome's furthest Eastern provinces to the Persians. He died before reaching his capital.
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... This siliqua of Jovian, ca 363, celebrates his fifth year of reign, as a good omen. ... Events Constantine the Great emperor of the Roman Empire, engaged the Visigoths in battle and was victorious. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 28 - Valentinian I is elected Roman emperor by the army. ...

Valentinian-Theodosian dynasty (364-457)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Valentinian I
(Flavius Valentinianus)
Officer under Julian and Jovian 321 26 February 364
Elected by the army upon Jovian's death
17 November 375
Died of cerebral haemorrhage
Shortly after his accession, he chose his brother Valens to rule alongside him. The pair then partitioned the Empire between themselves. Valentinian thereafter ruled in the West only. During his reign, the Empire was repeatedly ravaged by barbarians. His anger at the invasion of the Quadi caused his fatal haemorrhage.
Valens
( Flavius Iulius Valens )
Minor soldier of the Roman army, brother of Valentinian I 328 28 March 364
Appointed by his brother
9 August 378
Killed at the Battle of Adrianople
Called "The Last True Roman", he was chosen to rule the East by his brother, Valentinian I. His reign was ineffective, and at one point he came close to abdication and suicide following the proclamation of an imperial pretender, Procopius. He was killed in the disastrous Battle of Adrianople, in which most of his armies were destroyed by Gothic invaders.
Gratian
( Flavius Gratianus )
Son of Valentinian I, nephew of Valens 18 April/23 May 359 9 August 378
Inherited rule of the East upon the death of Valens
19 January 379
Appointed Theodosius I as Emperor of the East
25 August 383
Assassinated during the rebellion of Magnus Maximus
He inherited the rule of the East upon Valens' death. He appointed one of his generals, Theodosius, as Emperor in the East in the following year. He was also Emperor in the West (with Valentinian II) 375-383
Theodosius I
( Flavius Theodosius )
Aristocrat and military leader, brother-in-law of Gratian 11 January 347 19 January 379
Appointed by Gratian
17 January 395
old age
He was appointed Emperor in the East by Gratian, who needed a loyal ally to deal with the effects of Adrianople. He restored the Eastern armies by taking many barbarian mercenaries into Roman service. After the deaths of Gratian and Valentinian II, he took control of the Western half of the Empire. He was the last Emperor to de facto rule the entire Empire. Made Christianity the official religion of the Empire.
Arcadius
( Flavius Arcadius )
Son of Theodosius I 377/378 17 January 395
Upon the death of Theodosius I
1 May 408 A weak Emperor, dominated by his wife and ministers. Brother of the Western Emperor Honorius
Theodosius II
( Flavius Theodosius )
Son of Arcadius 10 April 401 1 May 408
Upon the death of Arcadius
28 July 450
Riding accident
He was heavily influenced by his sister, Pulcheria, who declared herself "Augusta" in 414. During his reign, her Christian views led to persecution of non-Christians in the Empire. However, the period also saw the construction of Constantinople's near-impregnable Theodosian Walls, and the publication of the Codex Theodosianus. He died in 450, leaving his sister as his heir.
Pulcheria
( Aelia Pulcheria )
Daughter of Arcadius, sister of Theodosius II 19 January 399 28 July 450
Upon the death of Theodosius II
July 453 After the death of her father, Arcadius, she became politically prominent. She was responsible for appointing the barbarian Aspar as Eastern Roman "Master of Soldiers", a position he would use to his own ends. Strongly Christian, she encouraged her brother to rule according to Christian values. She became a nun after being forced from the court in 441, but returned after her brother's death. She then married Marcian, and the pair ruled together until 453. She was later canonised by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Marcian
( Flavius Marcianus )
Soldier, politician, husband of Pulcheria 396 450
Upon his marriage to Pulcheria
January 457
Gangrene contracted on a journey
He was elevated to the imperial throne by his marriage to Pulcheria. He was supported by Aspar. Under his rule, the Eastern Empire recovered from the political and military vicissitudes of the past 3/4 of a century, and faced down Attila the Hun. The West, however, he left to fend for itself. He was canonised after his death by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

Valentinian I (321 - November 17, 375) was a Roman emperor of the Western Roman Empire (364 - 375) Mechanical non-creative reproduction of pre-copyright image. ... Flavius Valentinianus, known in English as Valentinian I, (321 - November 17, 375) was a Roman Emperor (364-375). ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 28 - Valentinian I is elected Roman emperor by the army. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Events The Huns invade Europe. ... The Quadi were a smaller Germanic tribe, about which little definitive information is known. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Solidus minted by Valens in 376. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 28 - Valentinian I is elected Roman emperor by the army. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Mid-February: Lentienses cross frozen Rhine, invading Roman Empire. ... Combatants Eastern Roman Empire Goths Commanders Valens â€  Fritigern, Alatheus, Saphrax Strength 15,000–30,000 10,000–20,000 Casualties 10,000–20,000 Unknown The second Battle of Adrianople (August 9, 378), sometimes known as the Battle of Hadrianopolis, was fought between a Roman army led by the Roman... Procopius of Caesarea (in Greek Προκόπιος, c. ... Combatants Eastern Roman Empire Goths Commanders Valens â€  Fritigern, Alatheus, Saphrax Strength 15,000–30,000 10,000–20,000 Casualties 10,000–20,000 Unknown The second Battle of Adrianople (August 9, 378), sometimes known as the Battle of Hadrianopolis, was fought between a Roman army led by the Roman... Image File history File links 158_Gratianus. ... A coin of Gratian. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Shield the Broken (The Red Skies) Battle of Amida: Shapur II of Persia conquers Amida from the Romans. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Mid-February: Lentienses cross frozen Rhine, invading Roman Empire. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 19 - Theodosius I is elevated as Roman Emperor at Sirmium. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events By Place Roman Empire January 19 - Arcadius is elevated to Emperor. ... Magnus Maximus. ... A marble statue of Emperor Valentinian II, Aphrodisias Geyre (Aydin, Anatolia), 387–390. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Council of Sardica Council of Philippopolis Births John Chrysostom, bishop Eunapius, Greek Sophist and historian Deaths Categories: 347 ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 19 - Theodosius I is elevated as Roman Emperor at Sirmium. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Idealising bust of Arcadius in the Theodosian style combines elements of classicism with the new hieratic style (Istanbul Archaeology Museum) Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arcadius For the Greek grammarian, see Arcadius of Antioch. ... Events Battle of the Willows, Roman troops fight an inconclusive battle against the Visigoths under Fritigern Births Deaths Tuoba Shi Yi Jian King of Dai Categories: 377 ... Events Mid-February: Lentienses cross frozen Rhine, invading Roman Empire. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Theodosius II succeeds his father Arcadius as Emperor of the Eastern half of the Roman Empire In the summer of this year, the usurper Constantine III captures Spain, destroying the loyalist forces defending it. ... Flavius Honorius (September 9, 384–August 15, 423) was Roman Emperor (393- 395) and then Western Roman Emperor from 395 until his death. ... Bust of Theodosius II, in the Louvre, Paris Image by ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Pope Innocent I succeeds Pope Anastasius I. The Vandals start their westward trek from Dacia and Hungary (or 400). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Theodosius II succeeds his father Arcadius as Emperor of the Eastern half of the Roman Empire In the summer of this year, the usurper Constantine III captures Spain, destroying the loyalist forces defending it. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... The Codex Theodosianus (Book of Theodosius) was a compilation of the laws of the Roman Empire under the Christian emperors since 312. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pulcheria (January 19, 399 – 453) was the daughter of the Eastern Roman Emperor Arcadius and Aelia Eudoxia. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Yazdegerd I becomes king of Persia November 27 - St. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... For other uses, see 453 (disambiguation). ... Flavius Ardabur Aspar (? - 471), an Alan, was the magister militum (Master of Soldiers) of the Byzantine Empire. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Another but lesser Marcian was a son-in-law of Byzantine Emperor Leo I and his queen Verina. ... Events Emperor An succeeds Emperor Xiaowu as ruler of the Chinese Jin Dynasty Augustine appointed bishop of Hippo in North Africa End of the Visigoth invasion in Greece. ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... Events February 7 - Leo I becomes East Roman emperor. ...

Leonid dynasty (457-518)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Leo I "the Thracian"
(Flavius Valerius Leo )
Soldier 401 7 February 457
Chosen by Aspar, commander-in-chief of the army
18 January 474
Died of dysentery
He was chosen by Aspar, who attempted to rule through him; Leo resisted and broke Aspar's power. In order to do this, he was forced to ally with the Isaurians, whose leader Tarasicodissa married Leo's daughter Ariadne and took the Roman name "Zeno". He raised Theodoric the Great in his court. He was the first Emperor to be crowned by the Patriarch of Constantinople.
Leo II
( Flavius Leo )
Grandson of Leo I 467 18 January 474
Succeeded his grandfather Leo I
17 November 474
Died of an unknown disease, possibly poisoned
He was the son of Ariadne (daughter of Leo I) by Zeno. He inherited the throne upon his grandfather's death. It was rumoured that his mother had poisoned him to allow Zeno to take the throne.
Zeno
( Flavius Zeno )
(Born Tarasicodissa)
Roman general of Isaurian origins; son-in-law of Leo I, father of Leo II c.425 Co-emperor: 9 February 474
Appointed by his son Leo II
Sole Emperor: 17 November 474
Succeeded upon the death of Leo II
9 January 475
Deposed by Basiliscus, brother-in-law of Leo I
9 April 491 An Isaurian chieftain, he gave his support to Leo I to overthrow Aspar. In exchange, he was allowed to marry Leo I's daughter Ariadne, by whom he had a son, Leo II. After the latter's death, he took the throne. Unpopular due to his barbarian origins, he was deposed by his mother-in-law, Verina, and her brother Basiliscus.
Basiliscus
( Flavius Basiliscus )
Army General; brother-in-law of Leo I 9 January 475
Seized power from Zeno
August 476
Deposed by Zeno
476/477 The brother of Leo I's wife, Verina. He was favoured by Leo I, who made him the leader of an expedition against Carthage. The expedition failed, however, Initially popular, Basiliscus alienated the Constantinopolitan population, and his own followers, partly through misfortunes of chance, partly through callous treatment of his allies and his support for the Monophysite Heresy. He was betrayed by his allies, and defeated when Zeno returned to the city with an army. He was then starved to death.
Zeno, restored
( Flavius Zeno )
(Born Tarasicodissa)
Roman general of Isaurian origins; son-in-law of Leo I, father of Leo II c.425 restored August 476
Having deposed Basiliscus
9 April 491 He rallied an army and restored himself by force. Shortly afterwards, he formally reunited the Roman Empire upon the deposition of the Western Emperor Romulus Augustulus, although in reality the West fell under barbarian control. He ruled laxly, but he left the East stronger than he had found it.
Anastasius I
( Flavius Anastasius )
Palace official ("Silentiarius"); son-in-law of Leo I c.430 11 April 491
Chosen by Ariadne, widow of Zeno
9 July 518 He was a reputable palace official chosen by Ariadne (daughter of Leo I, widow of Zeno) to succeed; the pair then married. He was at first popular due to his lowering of taxation; he lost popularity when he adopted a strong monophysite policy in his final years. His leadership in war lead to an exhaustive conflict between the Romans and the Persians, resulting in little benefit; he also faced ravaging of the Balkans by Slavic and Bulgar invasions.
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

The House of Leo which ruled the Eastern Roman Empire from 457 to 518 (and varying parts of the Western Roman Empire from 474 to 480). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1110x1480, 1061 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Byzantine Empire Leo I (emperor) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Leo I coin. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 7 - Leo I becomes East Roman emperor. ... Flavius Ardabur Aspar (? - 471), an Alan, was the magister militum (Master of Soldiers) of the Byzantine Empire. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Leo II briefly becomes Byzantine emperor. ... Flavius Ardabur Aspar (? - 471), an Alan, was the magister militum (Master of Soldiers) of the Byzantine Empire. ... Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). ... Image File history File links Leo_(474)-coin. ... Imperator Caesar Flavius Leo Augustus or Leo II (467- November 17, 474) served as Eastern Roman Emperor from January 18 to November 17, 474. ... Events April 12 - Anthemius elevated to Western Roman Emperor Births Leo II, Byzantine emperor Cerdic of Wessex (approximate date). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Leo II briefly becomes Byzantine emperor. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Events January 18 - Leo II briefly becomes Byzantine emperor. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Zeno (c. ... Events October 23 -Valentinian III becomes western Roman emperor. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Leo II briefly becomes Byzantine emperor. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Events January 18 - Leo II briefly becomes Byzantine emperor. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also 475 (number) Events Orestes forces western Roman emperor Julius Nepos to flee and declares his son Romulus Augustus to be emperor. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ælle sieges and conquers the fortified town of Anderida in England. ... Aelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno, who was married to her daughter Ariadne. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the genus of lizards, see Basiliscus (genus). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also 475 (number) Events Orestes forces western Roman emperor Julius Nepos to flee and declares his son Romulus Augustus to be emperor. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Events Huneric becomes king of Vandals Aelle king of the South Saxons, arrives in England, with his three sons, near Cymenshore. ... Aelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno, who was married to her daughter Ariadne. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Zeno (c. ... Events October 23 -Valentinian III becomes western Roman emperor. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ælle sieges and conquers the fortified town of Anderida in England. ... Romulus Augustus (460s/470s - after 511) was the last of the Western Roman Emperors. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Anastasius. ... Events Saint Patrick reaches Ireland on his missionary expedition. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ælle sieges and conquers the fortified town of Anderida in England. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 9 - Justin becomes Roman emperor September 29 - Severus, Patriarch of Antioch is deposed by a synod for his Monophysitism. ...

Justinian dynasty (518-602)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Justin I
(Flavius Iustinus )
General, commander of the City Guards under Anastasius I c.450 July 518
Elected by army and people upon the death of Anastasius I
1 August 527 He was an illiterate Macedonian peasant, who rose to become commander of the city guards. Through this position and lavish bribery, he secured the throne upon the death of Anastasius I. His reign was marked mainly by conflict with the Ostrogoths and Persians.
Justinian I
(Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus)
Nephew and heir of Justin I 482/483 1 August 527
Inherited the throne on the death of Justin I
13/14 November 565 The son of Justin I's sister, Vigilantia, he was adopted by his uncle, then a rising officer of the army, and brought to Constantinople where he was given a good education. He married in 525 Theodora, a shrewd and capable courtesan who acted as the power behind the throne whilst she lived. Under Justinian, large swathes of territory in Italy and the Adriatic coastline, North Africa, and Spain were reconquered, often bringing misery to the local inhabitants as a result. This "Renewal of the Empire", however, was ended by an outbreak of Plague across Europe, killing much of the Empire's population, and seriously weakening it. Against Justinian's credit of restoring Roman rule in parts of the west, and his work on creating "The Code of Justinian", must be set the dire legacy he left his heir, Justin II: a hugely reduced army, a crippled economy, and over-stretched resources.
Justin II
(Flavius Iustinus Iunior)
Nephew and heir of Justinian I c.520 14 November 565
Inherited the throne on the death of Justinian I
5 October 578 The son of Justinian I's sister, Vigilantia, he inherited the throne upon his uncle's death. He proved a dismal successor to Justinian: in 568, Italy was overrun by the Lombards; his refusal to pay tribute to the Avars led to a number of unsuccessful campaigns against them; and he lost Syria to the Persians. The stresses of his duties proved too much, and, after making his friend and general Tiberius co-Emperor, he lapsed into insanity.
Tiberius II Constantine
(Flavius Tiberius Constantinus)
"Comes" of the Excubitors, friend and adoptive son of Justin II c.520 5 October 578
Became full Emperor on the death of Justin II
14 August 582
possibly poisoned by Maurice
A friend of Justin II, he was adopted and made co-emperor in 574, upon the advice of the Empress Sophia. He thereafter ruled with the Empress until Justin's death in 578. During his reign, the Persians were defeated in Armenia, whilst the Roman territories in Spain and Africa were secured. However, he was unable to prevent Slavic invasions of the Balkans. He named his son-in-law, Maurice, heir when he became ill in 582; his death shortly afterwards was attributed by rumour to poison.
Maurice
(Flavius Mauricius Tiberius)
Commander-in-chief of Cappadocian origins; son-in-law of Tiberius II 539 14 August 582
Succeeded upon the death of his father-in-law Tiberius II
November 602
Forced to abdicate by Phocas
27 November 602
Executed by Phocas
One of Constantinople's outstanding generals, he successfully defeated the Persians in 581. He married Constantina, the daughter of Tiberius II in 582, and in the same year became Emperor upon Tiberius' death. He continued the Persian war until 591, when he secured peace by placing the exiled Sassanid heir Chosroes II on the Persian throne. He also warred mostly successfuly with the Avars and Slavs, and instituted the system of the "Exarchates" in Italy and Africa, allowing greater competence in defending Roman territory there. A refusal to pay a ransom demanded by the Avars in exchange for several thousand captured Roman soldiers led to the rebellion of Phocas, who had Maurice executed. His reign saw the last flowering of Roman power, and a weakening of both the Empire and Persia.
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Iustinus Augustus. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Events July 9 - Justin becomes Roman emperor September 29 - Severus, Patriarch of Antioch is deposed by a synod for his Monophysitism. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x2074, 440 KB) Description: Title: de: Chormosaiken in San Vitale in Ravenna, Szene: Kaiser Justinian und Bischof Maximilianus und sein Hof, Detail: Büste des Justinian Technique: de: Mosaik Dimensions: Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Ravenna Current... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... Events Qi Gao Di, ruler of the Chinese Qi Dynasty Byzantine emperor Zeno I issues the Henotikon, an attempt to reconcile the differences between the supporters of Orthodoxy and Monophysitism. ... Events March 13 - Pope Felix III succeeds Pope Simplicius The general Illus and Verina, mother-in-law of Byzantine emperor Zeno I, attempt to overthrow Zeno and place a general named Leontius on the throne. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... (Redirected from 13 November) November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 22 - Eutychius is deposed as Patriarch of Constantinople by John Scholasticus. ... Theodora, detail of a Byzantine mosaic in Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Iustinus Iunior Augustus Flavius Iustinus Iunior Augustus or Justin The Divine (c. ... Events February 20 - Epiphanius elected Patriarch of Constantinople. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 22 - Eutychius is deposed as Patriarch of Constantinople by John Scholasticus. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events Tiberius II Constantine succeeds Justin II as Byzantine Emperor Births Deaths July 30 - Jacob Baradaeus, bishop of Edessa October 5 - Justin II, Roman emperor Northern Zhou Wu Di, Chinese ruler John Malalas, Byzantine chronicler Categories: 578 ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flavius Tiberius Constantinus Augustus or Tiberius II Constantine (c. ... Events February 20 - Epiphanius elected Patriarch of Constantinople. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events Tiberius II Constantine succeeds Justin II as Byzantine Emperor Births Deaths July 30 - Jacob Baradaeus, bishop of Edessa October 5 - Justin II, Roman emperor Northern Zhou Wu Di, Chinese ruler John Malalas, Byzantine chronicler Categories: 578 ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Maurice I succeeds Tiberius II Constantine as Byzantine Emperor. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A solidus of Maurikios reign. ... Events November 29 - Antioch struck by an earthquake. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Maurice I succeeds Tiberius II Constantine as Byzantine Emperor. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... Events Phocas kills Byzantine Emperor Maurice I and makes himself emperor Beginning of a series of wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanids Births Muawiyah, founder of the Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs (approximate date) Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Phocas kills Byzantine Emperor Maurice I and makes himself emperor Beginning of a series of wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanids Births Muawiyah, founder of the Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs (approximate date) Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... In Late Antiquity, Maurice (582-602) was the only Byzantine Emperor except for Anastasius I, who did his best for determined Balkan policies, thus paying adequate attention to the safety of the northern frontier against Barbarian incursions. ...

Non-dynastic (602-610)

Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Phocas
(Flavius Phocas )
sub-altern in the Balkan army, leader of rebellion; deposed Maurice  ? November 602
Seized power in a rebellion against Maurice
610
Executed by Heraclius
A minor soldier in the Roman army, he led a rebellion against Maurice after the latter ordered the exhausted forces to winter on the unprotected side of the Danube, and then tried to send them on a winter campaign. In the ensuing rebellion, Maurice abdicated; Phocas had himself crowned Emperor, and then executed the ex-emperor and his children. He was initially popular due to his lowering of taxes and his reforms. However, under his rule, the traditional Roman borders in the east began to collapse, whilst the Persians supported rebellions on their border and advanced their control westwards. Eventually, his authority crumbled, and Heraclius proclaimed himself as Emperor and seized control, executing Phocas.
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

A coin of Byzantine Emperor, Phocas File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Phocas on a contemporary coin Flavius Phocas Augustus, Eastern Roman Emperor (reigned 602–610), is perhaps one of the most maligned figures to have held the Imperial title in the long history of Rome and Byzantium. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... Events Phocas kills Byzantine Emperor Maurice I and makes himself emperor Beginning of a series of wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanids Births Muawiyah, founder of the Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs (approximate date) Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas and becomes Emperor. ...

Heraclian dynasty (610-711)

  • Heraclius (Ηράκλειος) (575–641, ruled 610–641): usurper; son of the Armenian Exarch of Africa; defeated Chosroes II in final Sassanid-Byzantine War; lost Palestine,Syria and Egypt to Arab Expansion
  • Constantine III (Heraclius Constantine) (Κωνσταντίνος Γ') (612–641, ruled 641): son of Heraclius; coemperor with Heraklonas
  • Heraklonas (Constantine Heraclius) (Ηρακλωνάς) (626–641?, ruled 641): son of Herakleios; mutilated and deposed
  • Constans II (Herakleios, later Constantine, called Πωγωνάτος, the Bearded) (Κώνστας Β') (630–668, ruled 641–668): son of Constantine III; assassinated by chamberlain
  • Mezezius (668–669): Usurper
  • Constantine IV (Κωνσταντίνος Δ') (649–685, ruled 668–685): son of Constans II
  • Justinian II the Slit-nosed (Ιουστινιανός Β' ο Ρινότμητος) (668–711, ruled 685–695): son of Constantine IV; mutilated, deposed, and exiled
  • Leontios (Λεόντιος) (ruled 695–698): Usurper; Strategos (general); mutilated, deposed, and imprisoned—later executed
  • Tiberios III (Τιβέριος Γ' ο Αψίμαρος) (ruled 698–705): Usurper; German originally named Apsimar; deposed and executed
  • Justinian II the Slit-nosed (Ιουστινιανός Β' ο Ρινότμητος) (ruled 705–711): restored; deposed and executed
Picture Name - Greek Name - Latin Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Herakleios
(Ηράκλειος, Hērakleios)
Heraclius (Flavius Heraclius) son of Exarch Heraclius the Elder; deposed Phocas c.575 5 October 610
Seized power in a rebellion against Phocas
11 February 641 He rebelled against Phocas and seized power. After a long war with the Sassanid Empire and the Avars, he emerged victorious, fatally weakening both opponents. He was unable to prevent the loss of Syria, Palestine and Egypt to the newly emergent Arab Caliphate towards the end of his reign. He is credited with organising the system of Themata to defend the Empire, and with making Greek rather than Latin the official language of the Empire. He left the Empire to be ruled jointly by his two sons Constantine III and Heraklonas
Constantine III
(Ηράκλειος (νέος) Κωνσταντίνος, Herakleios Novos Kōnstantinos)
Constantine III ( Heraclius Novus Constantinus ) eldest son of Herakleios 3 May 612 11 February 641
Succeeded to throne with Heraklonas following death of Herakleios
24/26 May 641
Tuberculosis, allegedly poisoned by Martina
He was made co-Emperor with his father in 613, but did not fully accede until his father's death. He died shortly after his accession, his sole noteworthy act being bribing the army to safeguard the rights of his son, Constans II. The rumour that his stepmother, Martina, had poisoned him led to the downfall of herself and her son, Heraklonas
Heraklonas
(Κωνσταντίνος Ηράκλειος, Kōnstantinos Herakleios)
Heraclianus (Constantinus Heraclius) younger son of Herakleios 626 11 February 641
Succeeded to throne with Constantine III following death of Herakleios
September 641
Deposed by Senate
c.641
Presumed to have died in exile
He was made co-Emperor with his father in 638, but did not fully accede until his father's death. After his brother's death, he ruled briefly as co-emperor, then made his nephew, Constans II, co-emperor, to quell an army revolt. The people of Constantinople, however, distrusted him, believing that he and his mother Martina had murdered Constantine III; in September, the Senate deposed him and his mother, subjected both to ritual mutilation (Heraklonas lost his nose, Martina lost her tongue), and exiled them to Rhodes.
Constans II
(Κώνστας Β', Kōnstas II);
born Herakleios Constantine
(Ηράκλειος Κωνσταντίνος, Herakleios Kōnstantinos );
called "Constantine the Bearded" (Κωνσταντίνος Πωγωνάτος, Kōnstantinos Pogonatos)
Constans II
(Constantus II);
born Heraclius Constantine
( Heraclius Constantinus );
called "Constantine the Bearded"
son of Constantine III 7 November 630 641
Made co-Emperor by Hereklonas, sole emperor in that same year
15 September 668
Assassinated, possibly on the orders of Mezezius
His uncle, Heraklonas, made him co-emperor to quell a revolt; the revolt continued, and Heraklonas was deposed. Constans then ruled as sole emperor. In his reign, Egypt was lost completely by the Empire, whilst Carthage was also lost for a time. He stabilised the border in the Balkans. His religious attitudes led him to bring Pope Martin I to trial in Constantinople for his criticism of Constans. After executing his brother, Theodosius, he became hated by the people of Constantinople, and left for Syracuse; he spent the rest of his life in Italy. Rumours that he intended to establish Syracuse as his capital led to his being assassinated in his bath. A noble of the court, Mezesius, then established a military regime in Sicily for several months.
Constantine IV
(Κωνσταντίνος, Kōnstantinos)
Constantine
(Constantinos)
son of Constans II 652 15 September 668
succeeded following murder of Constans II
September 685
Died of dysentery
He became Emperor following the murder of his father; immediately, he was forced to suppress a revolt in Sicily, led by the imperial pretender Mezezius. In his reign, Constantinople was attacked by an Arab fleet between 672 and 678; Greek fire was used to drive them off. However, several coastal cities, including Smyrna and Cyzicus, were conquered by the Arabs, whilst the Bulgars took advantage of the situation to establish a state in Moesia, to which Constantine was forced to pay tribute. His reign also saw the formal condemnation of monothelitism by the Sixth Oecumenical Council.
Picture Name - Greek Name - Latin Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

For the Patriarch of Jerusalem, see Patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem. ... Roman coin depicting, on its face, Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas Heraclius Constantine or Constantine III (May 3, 612 - April 20/24 or May 26, 641) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudocia, and ruled as Emperor for four months... Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heracleonas. ... Constans and his son Constantine. ... Mezezius also known as Mecetius, Bizantine usurper in Sicily from 668 to 669. ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685); sometimes incorrectly called Pogonatus, meaning the Bearded, like his father; was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... Justinian II, known as Rhinotmetus (the Split-nosed) (669-711) was a Byzantine emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigned from 685 to 695 and again from 704 to 711. ... Leontius Leontius II was Byzantine emperor from 695-698. ... Tiberius III (d. ... Justinian II, known as Rhinotmetus (the Split-nosed) (669-711) was a Byzantine emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigned from 685 to 695 and again from 704 to 711. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the Patriarch of Jerusalem, see Patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem. ... Heraclius the Elder (Latin: , Greek: ) - Exarch of Africa, the father of Byzantine Emperor Heraclius. ... Events June 2 - Benedict succeeds John III as Pope The Kingdom of East Anglia founded by the Angle groups North Folk and South Folk, naming the places of Norfolk and Suffolk, respectively. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas and becomes Emperor. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... The themata in 950. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Roman coin depicting, on its face, Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas Heraclius Constantine or Constantine III (May 3, 612 - April 20/24 or May 26, 641) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudocia, and ruled as Emperor for four months... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... (Redirected from 24 May) May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Herakleios with his sons Constantine III and Heraklonas. ... Events July 2 - In the early morning, Li Shimin, the future Emperor Tang Taizong of China, eliminated two of his brothers, Li Yuanji and the crown prince Li Jiancheng in a coup détat at the Xuanwu Gate in Changan. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... Constans and his son Constantine. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Muhammad captures Mecca (January). ... Events Founding of the city of Fostat, later Cairo, in Egypt. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Childeric II succeeds Clotaire III as Frankish king Constantine IV becomes Byzantine Emperor, succeeding Constans II Theodore of Tarsus made archbishop of Canterbury. ... Martin I, born near Todi, Umbria in the place now named after him Pian S. Martino, was pope from 649 to 655, succeeding Theodore I in June or July 649. ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685); sometimes incorrectly called Pogonatus, meaning the Bearded, like his father; was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... Events Khazaria becomes an independent state (approximate date) Rodoald succeeds his father Rothari as king of the Lombards Births Clotaire III, king of the Franks Deaths Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib, uncle of Muhammed, progenitor of the Abbasids Saint Ida of Nivelles, widow of Pippin of Landen, monastic foundress Rothari... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Childeric II succeeds Clotaire III as Frankish king Constantine IV becomes Byzantine Emperor, succeeding Constans II Theodore of Tarsus made archbishop of Canterbury. ... For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Events Umayyad caliph Marwan I (684-685) succeeded by Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (685-705) Justinian II succeeds Constantine IV as emperor of the Byzantine Empire Sussex attacks Kent, supporting Eadrics claim to the throne held by Hlothhere Pope Benedict II succeeded by Pope John V Cuthbert consecrated...

Non-dynastic (711-717)

  • Philippikos Bardanes (Φιλιππικός Βαρδάνης) (ruled 711–713): Armenian soldier; deposed and mutilated
  • Anastasios II (Αναστάσιος Β') ( ?–721, ruled 713–715): orig. Artemios; secretary of Philippikos; deposed & entered monastery, later revolted & was executed
  • Theodosios III (Θεοδόσιος Γ' ο Αδραμμυττηνός) (ruled 715–717): tax-collector; abdicated and entered monastery

Philippicus (FILIPICUS) coin, celebrating the victories of the emperor (VICTORIA AVGU). ... Anastasius II kept his name, Artemius, also on his coinage; this solidus bears the legend APTEMIUS ANASTASIUS. Anastasius II (died 721), Byzantine emperor, whose original name was Artemius, was raised to the throne of Constantinople by the voice of the senate and people in 713, on the deposition of Philippicus... Theodosius III, emperor of the Byzantine Empire (715-717), was a financial officer and tax collector in Adramyttium before being acclaimed in May of 715 as an imperial candidate for the troops of the Opsikian theme rebelling against Anastasius II. According to the chronicler Theophanes, Theodosius was unwilling to accept...

Isaurian dynasty (717-802)

  • Leo III the Isaurian (Λέων Γ' ο Ίσαυρος) (675–741, ruled 717–741): Strategos
  • Constantine V Kopronymos (the Dung-named) (Κωνσταντίνος Ε' ο Κοπρώνυμος ή Καβαλίνος) (718–775, ruled 741): son of Leo III; deposed
  • Artabasdus the Icon-lover (Αρτάβασδος ο Εικονόφιλος) (ruled 741–743): Leo III's chamberlain and son-in-law
  • Constantine V Kopronymos (Κωνσταντίνος Ε' ο Κοπρώνυμος ή Καβαλίνος) (ruled 743–775): restored
  • Leo IV the Khazar (Λέων Δ' o Χαζάρος) (750–780, ruled 775–780): son of Constantine V
  • Constantine VI the Blinded (Κωνσταντίνος ΣΤ') (771–797, ruled 780–797): son of Leo IV; deposed and mutilated by mother, dying from wounds
  • Irene the Athenian (Ειρήνη η Αθηναία) (755–803, ruled 797–802): wife of Leo IV, mother of Constantine VI; canonized by the Orthodox church; deposed and exiled to Lesbos

Leo the Isaurian and his son Constantine V. Leo III the Isaurian or the Syrian (Greek: Λέων Γ΄, Leōn III ), (c. ... Constantine V with his father Leo III the Isaurian. ... Artabasdus was a chamberlain of the Byzantine emperor Leo III the Isaurian and briefly seized power in Constantinople soon after the accession of Leos son, Constantine V Copronymus, in 741. ... Constantine V with his father Leo III the Isaurian. ... Leo IV the Khazar (Greek: Λέων Δ΄, Leōn IV ), (January 25, 750 – September 8, 780), Byzantine Emperor from 775 to 780. ... Constantine VI (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Ϛ΄, Kōnstantinos VI; 771–797 or 805) was Byzantine Emperor from 780 to 797. ... This solidus struck under Irene reports the legend bASILISSH, Basilissa. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Lesbos (Modern Greek: Lesvos (Λέσβος), Turkish: Midilli), is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. ...

Nikephoros' dynasty (802-813)

  • Nikephoros I (Νικηφόρος Α') ( ?–811, ruled 802–811): Megas Logothetes; died in battle, skull used as wine cup
  • Staurakios (Σταυράκιος Φωκάς) ( ?–812, ruled 811): son of Nikephoros I; paralyzed
  • Michael I Rangabe (Μιχαήλ Α' Ραγκαβής) (ruled 811–813): son-in-law of Nikephoros I and master of the palace; deposed and entered monastery

Nicephorus I and his son and successor, Stauracius. ... The Megas Logothetes (Greek Μεγάς Λογοθέτης, Grand Accountant) was the head of the Byzantine bureaucracy during the middle era of the empire. ... Nicephorus I and Stauracius. ... Michael I on a contemporary coin Michael I Rhangabes, an obscure nobleman who had married Procopia, the daughter of Nicephorus I, and been made master of the palace. ...

Non-dynastic (813-820)

  • Leo V the Armenian (Λέων Ε' ο Αρμένιος) (775–820, ruled 813–820): Strategos; assassinated

Contemporary coin of Leo V. Leo V, surnamed The Armenian (775 – December 24, 820), was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 813 to 820, after first distinguishing himself as a general in the reigns of Nicephorus I and Michael I Rhangabes. ...

Phrygian dynasty (820-867)

  • Michael II the Stammerer or the Amorian (Μιχαήλ Β' ο Τραυλός ή Ψελλός) (770–829, ruled 820–829): Strategos, son-in-law of Constantine VI
  • Theophilus (Θεόφιλος) (813–842, ruled 829–842): son of Michael II
  • Theodora (Θεοδώρα) (ruled 842–855): wife of Theophilus; empress and regent for Michael III; canonized by the Orthodox church; deposed and entered monastery
  • Michael III the Drunkard (Μιχαήλ Γ' ο Μέθυσος) (840–867, ruled 842–867): son of Theophilos; assassinated

Michael II and his son Theophilos, founders of the Amorian dynasty. ... Theophilus (813 - 842) was Byzantine emperor from 829 to 842. ... Theodora depicted as ruler on this coin, with her son Michael, nominally emperor, and her daughter Thecla on the reverse. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... This coin struck during the regency of Theodora shows how Michael was less prominent than his mother, who is represented as ruler alone on the obverse, and even than his sister Thecla, who is depicted together with the young Michael on the reverse of this coin. ...

Macedonian dynasty (867-1056)

  • Basil I the Macedonian (Βασίλειος Α') (811–886, ruled 867–886): married Michael III's widow; died in hunting accident
  • Leo VI the Wise (Λέων ΣΤ' ο Σοφός) (866–912, ruled 886–912): likely either son of Basil I or Michael III;
  • Alexander (Αλέξανδρος Γ' του Βυζαντίου) (870–913, ruled 912–913): son of Basil I, regent for nephew
  • Constantine VII the Purple-born (Κωνσταντίνος Ζ' ο Πορφυρογέννητος) (905-959, ruled 913–959): son of Leo VI
  • Romanos I Lekapenos (Ρωμανός Α' ο Λεκαπηνός) (870–948, ruled 919–944): father-in-law of Constantine VII; coemperor, deposed by his sons and entered monastery
  • Romanos II the Purple-born (Ρωμανός Β' ο Πορφυρογέννητος) (939–963, ruled 959–963): son of Constantine VII
  • Nikephoros II Phokas (Νικηφόρος Β' Φωκάς) (912–969, ruled 963–969): Strategos; married Romanos II's widow, regent for Basil II; assassinated
  • John I Tzimiskes (Ιωάννης Α' Κουρκούας ο Τσιμισκής) (925–976, ruled 969–976): brother-in-law of Romanus II; lover of Nicephorus's wife but banned from marriage; regent for Basil
  • Basil II the Bulgar-slayer (Βασίλειος Β' ο Βουλγαροκτόνος) (958–1025, ruled 976–1025): son of Romanos II
  • Constantine VIII (Κωνσταντίνος Η')(960-1028, ruled 1025–1028): son of Romanos II; coemperor with Basil II
  • Zoe (Ζωή) ((c. 978–1050, ruled 1028–1050): daughter of Constantine VIII
  • Romanos III Argyros (Ρωμανός Γ' ο Αργυρός) (968–1034, ruled 1028–1034): eparch of Constantinople; Zoe's first husband, arranged by Constantine VIII; murdered
  • Michael IV the Paphlagonian (Μιχαήλ Δ' ο Παφλαγών) (1010–1041, ruled 1034–1041): Zoe's second husband
  • Michael V the Caulker (Μιχαήλ Ε' ο Καλαφάτης) (1015–1042, ruled 1041–1042): Michael IV's nephew, Zoe's adopted son
  • Theodora (Θεοδώρα) (980–1056, ruled 1042): daughter of Constantine VIII, coempress with Zoe
  • Constantine IX Monomachos (Κωνσταντίνος Θ' ο Μονομάχος) (1000–1055, ruled 1042–1055): Zoe's third husband
  • Theodora (Θεοδώρα) (ruled 1055–1056): restored

Basil, his son Constantine, and his second wife, emperess Eudoxia Ingerina. ... This follis by Leo VI bears the Byzantine Emperors official title, BASILEVS ROMEON, Emperor of the Romans; translation of text: Leo, by the grace of God, King of Romans Leo VI the Wise or the Philosopher (Greek: Λέων ΣΤ΄, Leōn VI, Armenian: [1]), (September 19, 866 – May 11, 912) was Byzantine... Image:Byzantine Emperor Alexandros (912 – June 6, 913) 10th centuary. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos or Porphyrogenitus, the Purple-born (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Ζ΄ Πορφυρογέννητος, Kōnstantinos VII PorphyrogennÄ“tos), (Constantinople, September 905 – November 9, 959 in Constantinople) was the son of the Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karbonopsina. ... Contemporary coin of Romanus I. Romanus I Lecapenus (Romanos I Lakapenos, 870 - 948), who shared the throne of the Byzantine Empire with Constantine VII and exercised all the real power from 919 to 944, was admiral of the Byzantine fleet on the Danube River when, hearing of the defeat of... Romanus II (939 - 963) succeeded his father Constantine VII as Byzantine emperor in 959 at the age of twenty-one, and died, poisoned, it was believed, by his wife, Theophanu in 963. ... Emperor Nicephoros Phocas Nicephorus II Phocas was one of the most brilliant generals in the history of Byzantium who rose to become a mediocre emperor from 963 until his assassination in 969. ... Ioannes, protected by God and the Virgin Mary. ... Painting of Basil II, from an 11th century manuscript. ... Constantine VIII (in Greek Konstantinos VIII, written Κωνσταντίνος Η) (960 – November 15, 1028), Byzantine emperor (December 15, 1025 – November 15, 1028) was the son of the Emperor Romanus II and the younger brother of the eminent Basil... Empress Zoe as depicted in a mosaic from the Hagia Sophia Zoe (in Greek Ζωή, meaning life), (c. ... Romanus III (Argyrus), (in Greek Romanos Argyros, written Ρωμανός Αργυρός, lived 968 - April 11, 1034) was a Byzantine emperor(November 15, 1028 to April 11, 1034). ... Michael IV, the Paphlagonian, (1010 - December 10, 1041) (in Greek Μιχαήλ Παφλαγών, meaning from the province of Paphlagonia) was Byzantine emperor (April 11, 1034 to December 10, 1041). ... Michael V Calaphates (1015 - August 24, 1042) (in Greek Μιχαήλ Καλαφάτης, meaning the caulker), was the nephew and successor as Byzantine emperor of Michael IV and adoptive son of his wife Zoë. His surname reflected the early... Theodora (in Greek Θεοδώρα, literally meaning Gift of God, lived 981 - August 31, 1056) ruled as Byzantine Empress from January 11, 1055 to August 31, 1056. ... Mosaic of Constantine IX and Empress Zoe Constantine IX Monomachus (c. ... Theodora (in Greek Θεοδώρα, literally meaning Gift of God, lived 981 - August 31, 1056) ruled as Byzantine Empress from January 11, 1055 to August 31, 1056. ...

Non-dynastic (1056-1057)

  • Michael VI the General (Μιχαήλ ΣΤ' ο Στρατιωτικός) (ruled 1056–1057): chosen by Theodora; deposed & entered monastery

Michael VI Stratioticus, the warlike, was Byzantine emperor (1056 - 1057). ...

Komnenid dynasty (1057-1059)

  • Isaac I Komnenos (Ισαάκιος Α' ο Κομνηνός) (c. 1007–1060, ruled 1057–1059): soldier; abdicated in a fit of illness & entered monastery

Isaac coin. ...

Doukid dynasty (1059-1081)

  • Constantine X Doukas (Κωνσταντίνος Ι' ο Δούκας) (1006–1067, ruled 1059–1067): selected by Michael Psellus
  • Michael VII Doukas Quarter-short (Μιχαήλ Ζ' Δούκας Παραπινάκης) (1050–1090, ruled 1067–1078): son of Constantine X, originally coemperor with two brothers and Romanus; deposed & entered monastery
  • Romanos IV Diogenes (Ρωμανός Δ' Διογένης) (1032–1072, ruled 1068–1071): married Constantine X's widow; coemperor, deposed & mutilated to death
  • Nikephoros III Botaneiates (Νικηφόρος Γ' Βοτανειάτης) (1001–1081, ruled 1078–1081): Strategos claiming descent from the Fabii, bigamously married Michael VII's wife; deposed & forced into monastery

Constantine X Ducas (1006 - May, 1067) was the emperor of the Byzantine Empire (1059 - 1067). ... Michael Psellus is the name of two writers of the Byzantine Empire: Michael Psellus the Elder, a theologian Michael Psellus the Younger, a historian. ... Michael VII Ducas or Parapinakes, was the eldest son of Constantine X Ducas and Eudocia Macrembolitissa. ... Diptych of Romanus and Eudocia Macrembolitissa, crowned by Christ (Bibliothèque nationale de France) Romanos IV Diogenes or Romanus IV Diogenes (Greek: Ρωμανός Δ΄ Διογένης, Rōmanos IV Diogenēs) was Byzantine emperor from 1068 to 1071. ... Nicephorus Botaniates. ... For the racehorse named Fabius, please see Fabius. ...

Komnenid dynasty (1081-1185)

  • Alexios I Komnenos (Αλέξιος Α' Κομνηνός) (1057–1118, ruled 1081–1118): nephew of Isaac I, married Constantine X's grandniece
  • John II Komnenos the Handsome (Ιωάννης Β' Κομνηνός o Καλός) (1087–1143, ruled 1118–1143): son of Alexios I, died of a hunting accident
  • Manuel I Komnenos the Great (Μανουήλ Α' Κομνηνός ο Μέγας) (1118–1180, ruled 1143–1180): son of John II
  • Alexios II Komnenos (Αλέξιος B' Κομνηνός) (1169–1183, ruled 1180–1183): son of Manuel I; murdered with garrotte
  • Andronikos I Komnenos (Ανδρόνικος Α' Κομνηνός) (1118–1185, ruled 1183–1185): nephew of John II; married Alexios II's widow; deposed, tortured, and executed; ancestor of the Komnenian line in Trebizond
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes
Alexios I Komnenos
(Greek: Alexios Komnenos:
Αλέξιος Α' Κομνηνός
)
(Latin: Alexius I Comnenus )
Nephew of Isaac I, military commander 1048 4 April 1081
Proclaimed by his troops
15 August 1118
Picture Name Status Birth Emperor from Emperor until Death Notes

Byzantine emperor Alexios I Komnenos The Komnenos or Comnenus (Greek: Κομνηνοί) family was an important dynasty in the history of the Byzantine Empire. ... Emperor Alexios I Komnenos Alexios I Komnenos or Alexius I Comnenus (Greek: ; Latin: ; 1048 – August 15, 1118), Byzantine emperor (1081–1118), was the son of John Komnenos and Anna Dalassena and the nephew of Isaac I Komnenos (emperor 1057–1059). ... “John Komnenus” redirects here. ... For the eldest son of Andronikos I Komnenos and father of Alexios I of Trebizond, see Manuel Komnenos (born 1145). ... Alexios II Komnenos or Alexius II Comnenus (Greek: Αλέχιος Β’ Κομνηνός, Alexios II Komnēnos) (14 September 1169 – October 1183, Constantinople), Byzantine emperor (1180-1183), was the son of Emperor Manuel I Komnenos and Maria, daughter of Raymond, prince of Antioch. ... Billon trachy (a cup-shaped coin) of Andronikos I Komnenos (1183-1185) Andronikos I Komnenos or Andronicus I Comnenus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Α’ Κομνηνός, Andronikos I Komnēnos) (c. ... Trabzon, formerly known as Trebizond, is a city on the Black Sea coast of north-eastern Turkey. ... Painting of Alexius I, from a Greek manuscript in the Vatican library This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Emperor Alexios I Komnenos Alexios I Komnenos or Alexius I Comnenus (Greek: ; Latin: ; 1048 – August 15, 1118), Byzantine emperor (1081–1118), was the son of John Komnenos and Anna Dalassena and the nephew of Isaac I Komnenos (emperor 1057–1059). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Corfu taken from Byzantine Empire by Robert Guiscard, Italy Byzantine emperor Nicephorus III is overthrown by Alexius I Comnenus, ending the Middle Byzantine period and beginning the Comnenan dynasty Alexius I helps defend Albania from the Normans (the first recorded mention of Albania), but is defeated at the Battle... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Knights Templar founded Baldwin of Le Bourg succeeds his cousin Baldwin I as king of Jerusalem John II Comnenus succeeds Alexius I as Byzantine emperor Gelasius II succeeds Paschal II as pope Births November 28 - Manuel I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1180) Andronicus I Comnenus, Byzantine Emperor (died 1185...

Angelid dynasty (1185-1204)

  • Isaac II Angelos (Ισαάκιος Β' Άγγελος) (1156–1204, ruled 1185–1195): great-grandson of Alexios I, deposed & blinded
  • Alexios III Angelos (Αλέξιος Γ' Άγγελος) (1153–1211, ruled 1195–1203): brother of Isaac II, deposed by the Fourth Crusade and eventually forced into monastery
  • Isaac II Angelos (Ισαάκιος Β' Άγγελος) (ruled 1203–1204): restored after Alexios III had fled as coemperor with Alexius IV, deposed by Alexios V
  • Alexios IV Angelos (Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (1182–1204, ruled 1203–1204): son of Isaac II, deposed and killed by Alexios V
  • Nikolaos Kanabos: usurper in rebellion to Isaac II and Alexios IV 1204
  • Alexios V Doukas Mourtzouphlos (Αλέξιος Ε' Δούκας ο Μούρτζουφλος) (1140–1204, ruled 1204): usurper; son-in-law of Alexios III

Isaac II Angelos or Angelus (Greek: Ισαάκιος Β’ Άγγελος, Isaakios II Angelos) (September 1156 – January 1204) was Byzantine emperor from 1185 to 1195, and again from 1203 to 1204. ... Alexios III Angelos or Alexius III Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Γ Άγγελος) (c. ... The Entry of the Crusaders into Constantinople (Eugène Delacroix, 1840). ... Isaac II Angelos or Angelus (Greek: Ισαάκιος Β’ Άγγελος, Isaakios II Angelos) (September 1156 – January 1204) was Byzantine emperor from 1185 to 1195, and again from 1203 to 1204. ... Emperor Alexios IV Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ Άγγελος) (c. ... Nikolaos Kanabos was elected Emperor of Byzantium on the 25. ... Alexios V Doukas Mourtzouphlos or Alexius V Ducas Murtzuphlus (Greek: Αλέξιος Ε΄ Δούκας Μούρτζουφλος) (d. ...

Laskarid dynasty (Empire of Nicaea, 1204-1261)

  • Constantine Laskaris (ruled 1204): not officially crowned
  • Theodore I Laskaris (Θεόδωρος Α' Λάσκαρης) (1174–1222, ruled 1204–1222): son-in-law of Alexios III
  • John III Doukas Vatatzes (Ιωάννης Γ' Δούκας Βατάτζης) (1192–1254, ruled 1222–1254): son-in-law of Theodore I; epileptic
  • Theodore II Doukas Laskaris (Θεόδωρος Β' Δούκας Λάσκαρης) (1221–1258, ruled 1254–1258): son of John III
  • John IV Doukas Laskaris (Ιωάννης Δ' Δούκας Λάσκαρης) (1250–1305, ruled 1258–1261): son of Theodore II, deposed, blinded, and imprisoned by Michael VIII

Constantine Laskaris (Greek Κωνσταντίνος Λάσκαρης) was Byzantine emperor for a few months in 1204. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... John III Doukas Vatatzes or Ducas Vatatzes (Greek: Ιωάννης Γ΄ Δούκας Βατάτζης, Iōannēs III Doukas Batatzēs) (c. ... Theodore II Doukas Laskaris or Ducas Lascaris (Greek: Θεόδωρος Β΄ Δούκας Λάσκαρις, Theodōros II Doukas Laskaris) (1221/1222–August 18, 1258) was emperor of Nicaea, 1254–1258. ... John IV Doukas Laskaris or Ducas Lascaris (Greek: Ιωάννης Δ΄ Δούκας Λάσκαρις, Iōannēs IV Doukas Laskaris), December 25, 1250 - c. ...

Palaiologan Dynasty (restored to Constantinople, 1259-1453)

  • Michael VIII Palaiologos (Μιχαήλ Η' Παλαιολόγος) (1224–1282, ruled 1259–1282): Strategos, regent for John IV Lascaris; great-grandson of Alexios III Angelos
  • Andronikos II Palaiologos the Elder (Ανδρόνικος Β' ο Γέρος) (1258–1332, ruled 1282–1328): son of Michael VIII; abdicated
  • Andronikos III Palaiologos the Younger (Ανδρόνικος Γ' Παλαιολόγος ο Νέος) (1297–1341, ruled 1328–1341): grandson of Andronikos II
  • John V Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ε' Παλαιολόγος) (1332–1391, ruled 1341–1347): son of Andronikos III, deposed by John VI
  • John VI Kantakouzenos (Ιωάννης Στ' Καντακουζηνός) (1295–1383, ruled outright 1347–1354): father-in-law of John V; deposed, and entered monastery as Ioasaph Christodoulus
  • John V Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ε' Παλαιολόγος) (ruled 1354–1376): restored, deposed by Andronikos IV
  • Andronikos IV Palaiologos (Ανδρόνικος Δ' Παλαιολόγος) (1348–1385, ruled 1376–1379): son of John V, half-blinded following revolt, later succeeded and was deposed, revolted a third time
  • John VII Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ζ' Παλαιολόγος) (1370-1408, co-emperor 1376-1379), deposed
  • John V Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ε' Παλαιολόγος) (Ιωάννης Ε' Παλαιολόγος) (ruled 1379–1390): restored, deposed
  • John VII Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ζ' Παλαιολόγος) (ruled 1390)
  • John V Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ε' Παλαιολόγος) (ruled 1390–1391): restored
  • Manuel II Palaiologos (Μανουήλ Β' Παλαιολόγος) (1350–1425, ruled 1391–1425): son of John V
  • John VII Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Ζ' Παλαιολόγος) (regent 1399–1402)
  • John VIII Palaiologos (Ιωάννης Η' Παλαιολόγος) (1392–1448, ruled 1425–1448): son of Manuel II
  • Constantine XI Palaiologos Dragases (Κωνσταντίνος ΙΑ' Παλαιολόγος Δραγάσης) (1405–1453, ruled 1449–1453): son of Manuel II, not crowned in Constantinople, died during the Fall of Constantinople.

The Byzantine Empire in 1265 (William R. Shepherd, Historical Atlas, 1911) Michael VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μιχαήλ Η΄ Παλαιολόγος, MikhaÄ“l VIII Palaiologos) (1224/1225 – December 11, 1282) reigned as Byzantine emperor 1259–1282. ... John IV Lascaris was only a boy of 8 years when he was elevated as emperor of the Nicaean Empire in 1258 on the death of his father Theodore II Lascaris. ... Alexios III Angelos or Alexius III Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Γ Άγγελος) (c. ... Andronikos II Palaiologos or Andronicus II Palaeologus (Greek: ) (1259/1260 – February 13, 1332), reigned as Byzantine emperor 1282–1328. ... Andronikos III Palaiologos or Andronicus III Palaeologus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Γ Παλαιολόγος) (March 25, 1297 - June 15, 1341) reigned as Byzantine emperor 1328–1341, after being rival emperor since 1321. ... John V Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: , IōannÄ“s V Palaiologos), (1332 – February 16, 1391) was the son of Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos and Anna of Savoy. ... John VI Kantakouzenos or Cantacuzene (Greek: Ιωάννης ΣΤ΄ Καντακουζηνός, IōannÄ“s VI KantakouzÄ“nos) (c. ... John V Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: , IōannÄ“s V Palaiologos), (1332 – February 16, 1391) was the son of Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos and Anna of Savoy. ... Andronikos IV Palaiologos or Andronicus IV Palaeologus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Δ Παλαιολόγος) (April 2, 1348–June 28, 1385), was Byzantine emperor from 1376 to 1379. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John V Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: , IōannÄ“s V Palaiologos), (1332 – February 16, 1391) was the son of Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos and Anna of Savoy. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John V Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: , IōannÄ“s V Palaiologos), (1332 – February 16, 1391) was the son of Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos and Anna of Savoy. ... Emperor Manuel II Manuel II Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μανουήλ Β΄ Παλαιολόγος, ManouÄ“l II Palaiologos) (June 27, 1350 – July 21, 1425) was Byzantine emperor from 1391 to 1425. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek Ιωάννης Η Παλαιολόγος, IōannÄ“s VIII Palaiologos) (December 18 1392 – October 31, 1448), was Byzantine Emperor from 1425 to 1448. ... Constantine XI: The last Byzantine emperor is considered a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires...

Palaiologan Dynasty (claimants in exile)

  • Thomas Palaiologos (Θωμάς Παλαιολόγος) (1409 or 1410–1465): Despot of Morea, brother of Constantine XI; died in exile in Rome.
  • Andrew Palaiologos (Ανδρέας Παλαιολόγος) (1453–1502): son of Thomas; created Despot by Pope Pius II, self-styled Imperator Constantinopolitanus.

Thomas Palaeologus or Thomas Palaiologos (1409-1465) was Despot of Morea from 1449 until Ottoman conquest in 1460. ... The Despotate of Morea in 1450, showing Mystras. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Despotes (Greek Despotēs, feminine Despoina, Bulgarian and Serbian Despot, feminine Despotica, sometimes Anglicized Despot), is a Byzantine court title, also granted in the Latin Empire, Bulgaria, Serbia, and the Empire of Trebizond. ... Pope Pius II, born Enea Silvio Piccolomini (Latin Aeneas Sylvius), (October 18, 1405 – August 14, 1464) was Pope from 1458 until his death. ...

See also

This is a list of the Roman Emperors with the dates they ruled the Roman Empire. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... This is a list of people, places, things, and concepts related to or originating from the Byzantine Empire. ...

References

  1. ^ Hooker, Richard. "The Byzantine Empire." Middle Ages. World Cultures. 4 June 2007 <http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/MA/BYZ.HTM>.
Roman Emperors by Epoch
see also: List of Roman Emperors · Concise list of Roman Emperors · Roman Empire
Principate Crisis of the 3rd century Dominate Division Successors



  • Eastern Roman Emperors

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