FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
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Encyclopedia > List of Bowdoin College people

Here follows a list of notable people associated with Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. This list includes alumni, faculty, and honorary degree recipients. Bowdoin College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1794, located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Brunswick is a town located in Cumberland County, Maine. ...

Contents

Distinguished Graduates

Arts & Letters

Nathaniel Hawthorne, class of 1825
Nathaniel Hawthorne, class of 1825

Nathaniel Hawthorne Hawthorn died in 1864, Image should be PD This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 - May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Seba Smith (September 14, 1792 - July 28, 1868) was an American humorist and writer. ... Jacob Abbott (November 14, 1803 – October 31, 1879) was an American writer of childrens books. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Poets corner Poets Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often considered one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 - May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Salem Custom House The Scarlet Letter, published in 1850, is an American romance novel written by Nathaniel Hawthorne; generally considered to be his masterpiece. ... The House of the Seven Gables, Salem, Massachusetts. ... John Stevens Cabot Abbott (September 18, 1805 - June 17, 1877), an American writer, was born in Brunswick, Maine, in 1805. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Maryland County is the southern and easternmost county of Liberias 15 counties and shares a border with Côte dIvoire. ... Robert Peter Tristam Coffin (1892-1955) was a writer, poet and professor at Wells College (1921-1934) and Bowdoin College (1934-1955). ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... Phillips Haynes Lord (July 13, 1902 - October 19, 1975) was an American radio program writer, creator, and narrator as well as a motion picture actor. ... This article is about Hodding Carter II, the journlalist. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... Francis Russell - (b. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th (1921-1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. ... James E. Bassett Jr. ... In Harms Way is a 1965 film, produced and directed by Otto Preminger and distributed by Paramount Pictures. ... H. Richard Hornberger (February 1, 1924 – November 4, 1997) was an American writer and surgeon, born in Trenton, New Jersey, who wrote under the pseudonym Richard Hooker. ... M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, the original novel that inspired the M*A*S*H movie and TV series, was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a U.S. mobile army surgical hospital in Korea during the Korean War. ... Abelardo Morell (born Havana, Cuba, 1948) is a Boston-based photographer. ... DJ Spooky, That Subliminal Kid (born Paul Miller, 1970), is a Washington DC-born illbient and trip hop musician, turntablist and producer. ...

Government

14th President of the United States, Franklin Pierce, class of 1824
14th President of the United States, Franklin Pierce, class of 1824
Former Senate Majority Leader, George Mitchell, class of 1954
Former Senate Majority Leader, George Mitchell, class of 1954
8th Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Melville Fuller, class of 1853
8th Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Melville Fuller, class of 1853
  • Christopher Hill 1974, US Ambassador to Macedonia (1996-99), Poland (2000-2004), and South Korea (2004-2005); Undersecretary of State/Chief US Negotiator with North Korea (2005-Present)
  • Lawrence Lindsey 1976, professor of economics at Harvard, and economic adviser to President George W. Bush (2001-2002)
  • Tom Andrews 1976, congressman from Maine (1991-1995)
  • Stephen Laffey 1984, mayor of Cranston, R.I. (2002-present); candidate for U.S. Senate (2006)

File links The following pages link to this file: Franklin Pierce Categories: U.S. history images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Franklin Pierce Categories: U.S. history images ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... There have been a number of prominent people named George Evans: For the American congressman, see George Evans (politician) For the Australian explorer, see George Evans (explorer) For the Sergeant-Major of The Manchester Regiment awarded the Victoria Cross in World War I, see George Evans (VC) For the comic... James Bell is an 8th-grader at Rockridge secondary school. ... Hon. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Franklin Pierce College is a four-year liberal-arts college in rural Rindge, New Hampshire, founded in 1962 and named after Franklin Pierce, the New Hampshire-born 14th President of the United States. ... James Ware Bradbury (June 10, 1802–January 6, 1901) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Jonathan Cilley (July 2, 1802 - February 24, 1838) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Maine. ... Commodore Horatio Bridge (1806–1893) was a United States Naval officer. ... John Fairfield (January 30, 1797–December 24, 1847) was a U.S. politician from Maine. ... Alpheus Felch (September 28, 1804 – June 13, 1896) was Governor and U.S. Senator from Michigan. ... An aerial view of the Law Quadrangle at the University of Michigan. ... Felch Township is a township located in Dickinson County in the U.S. state of Michigan, named in honor of Alpheus Felch. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1840 that faded out by about 1856. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the twenty-first President of the United States. ... Samuel Clement Fessenden (March 7, 1815–April 18, 1882) was a United States Congressman and brother of Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden. ... Dr. Alonozo Garcelon (1813-1906) was a Governor of Maine, a Civil War general and a founder of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ... For other uses, see Bates (disambiguation), Bates (surname) Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Storming of Fort Wagner, the most famous operation performed by the 54th Massachusetts Regiment The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that participated in the American Civil War which was the first formal Army unit to be comprised of African-Americans. ... Lorenzo De Medici Sweat (May 26, 1818 - July 26, 1898) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... Thomas Amory Deblois Fessenden, (January 23, 1826–September 28, 1868) was a U.S. Representative from Maine and brother of Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden. ... La Fayette Grover (b. ... William Pierce Frye William Pierce Frye (September 2, 1830 – August 8, 1911) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... For other uses, see Bates (disambiguation), Bates (surname) Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Isaac Newton Evans Isaac Evans (July 29, 1827 – December 3, 1901) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Image File history File links From [1]. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links From [1]. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... There have been several well-known people named George Mitchell, including: George Mitchell (musician) George J. Mitchell (politician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Maj. ... William D. Washburn William Drew Washburn (January 14, 1831–July 29, 1912) was an American politician. ... Wilmot Wood Brookings was an American pioneer, frontier judge, and early South Dakota politician. ... Brookings is a city in Brookings County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 18,504 at the 2000 census. ... Sumner Increase Kimball, Sc. ... The United States Life-Saving Service was a Federal agency that grew out of private and local humanitarian efforts to save the lives of shipwrecked mariners and passengers. ... The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense, among other duties of coast guards elsewhere. ... Ellis Spear was a Civil War general in the 20th Maine. ... Official portrait of Thomas B. Reed. ... Charles Fletcher Johnson (February 14, 1859–February 15, 1930) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Maine from 1911 until 1917. ... Wallace Humphrey White, Jr. ... Senator Owen Brewster defeated after battles with Howard Hughes Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ... Paul Howard Douglas (March 26, 1892 - September 24, 1976) was a University of Chicago economist and Democratic United States Senator, 1949–1967, representing the State of Illinois. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... Shield of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. ... Horace Augustus Hildreth was born on December 2, 1902 in Gardiner, Maine, the son of an attorney. ... Bucknell University is a highly competitive private university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Joseph Fisher (Born May 14, 1982 in Southfield, Michigan) is an American college student and writer. ... George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933 in Waterville, Maine) is Chairman of the Walt Disney Company. ... Alternate meanings: Disney (disambiguation) The Walt Disney Company (also known as Disney Enterprises, Inc. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States, considered the equivalent of the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. ... Queens University, Belfast - or officially The Queens University of Belfast (QUB; in Irish, Ollscoil na Banríona, Béal Feirste) - is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired United States Ambassador. ... William Sebastian Cohen (born August 28, 1940) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Thomas H. Allen was born April 16, 1945, in Portland, Maine. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... Portland is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a 2004 population of 63,882. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x1473, 85 KB) Copyright 1908, thus public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x1473, 85 KB) Copyright 1908, thus public domain. ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Assistant Secretary Christopher R. Hill Christopher R. Hill is a U.S. diplomat and the current Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs. ... Lawrence B. Lindsey was assistant for economic policy to the U.S. President George W. Bush and Director of the National Economic Council in 2001-2002. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Thomas Hiram Andrews, b. ... Stephen (Steve) Laffey is the current mayor of Cranston, Rhode Island. ... Location of Cranston, Rhode Island. ... Official language(s) None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ...

Law

Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833–July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Frederick G. Fred Fisher, Jr. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ... Early in 1954, the U.S. Army accused Senator Joseph R. McCarthy (Republican, Wisconsin), and his chief counsel, Roy Cohn, of pressuring the Army to give favorable treatment to former McCarthy aide and friend of Cohns, G. David Schine. ... Dennis J. Hutchinson (born 1946) is a professor of law at the University of Chicago. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Byron White, official portrait. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For more detail about the political scandal, see Plame affair. ... Valerie and Joseph Valerie Elise Plame Wilson[1] (born April 19, 1963 in Anchorage, Alaska) was a United States Central Intelligence Agency officer, who was identified as a CIA operative in a newspaper column by Robert Novak on July 14, 2003. ...

Science & Medicine

William Smyth was born in Pittston, Maine, in 1797, and died in Brunswick, Maine, April 3, 1868). ... hello iam Francis Robbins Upton ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life in the 20th century. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... George Edwin Lord (February 17, 1846 - June 25, 1876) was a U.S. Army Assistant Surgeon in the 7th Cavalry who was killed in the Battle of the Little Big Horn in Montana Territory during the Black Hills War. ... The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also called Custers Last Stand, was an engagement between a Lakota-Cheyenne combined force and the 7th Cavalry of the United States Army that took place on June 25, 1876 near the Little Bighorn River in the eastern Montana Territory. ... Edwin Herbert Hall (November 7, 1855 - November 20, 1938) was an American physicist who discovered the Hall effect. Hall conducted thermoelectric research at Harvard and where he also wrote numerous physics textbooks and laboratory manuals. ... Hall effect diagram, showing electron flow (rather than conventional current). ... The quantum Hall effect is a quantum-mechanical version of the Hall effect, observed in two-dimensional systems of electrons subjected to low temperatures and strong magnetic fields, in which the Hall conductance σ takes on the quantized values where e is the elementary charge and h is Plancks constant. ... Ohm may refer to: The scientist Georg Ohm. ... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 – February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the geographic North Pole. ... North Pole Scenery When not otherwise qualified, the term North Pole usually refers to the Geographic North Pole – the northernmost point on the surface of the Earth, where the Earths axis of rotation intersects the Earths surface. ... Donald Baxter MacMillan (November 10, 1874 - September 7, 1970) was an American explorer, sailor, researcher and lecturer who made over 30 expeditions to the Arctic during his 46-year career. ... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 - February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who is usually credited as the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the Geographic North Pole. ... Dr. Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University Bloomington, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... The Kinsey Reports are two books on human sexual behavior, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953), by Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey, Wardell Pomeroy and others. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, often shortened to Kinsey Institute, exists to promote interdisciplinary research and scholarship in the fields of human sexuality, gender, and reproduction. The Institute was founded as the Institute for Sex Research at Indiana University at Bloomington in 1947 by Alfred...

Athletics

  • Fred Tootell 1923, Olympic gold medalist in the hammer throw (1924)
  • Philip Good 1936, co-world recorld holder in the 40-, 45- and 50-meter hurdles
  • Joan Benoit Samuelson 1979, world record holder and winner of the Boston (1979, 1983), Olympic (1984) and Chicago (1985) marathons

Fred Tootell (born 9 September 1902) was an American athlete who competed mainly in the hammer throw. ... Joan Benoit Samuelson (born May 16, 1957) was an American marathon runner who won gold at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. ...

Business

Bath Iron Works from NAS Brunswick photo gallery Bath Iron Works (BIW) is located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... L.L. Bean is a retail and catalog company based in Freeport, Maine, specializing in outdoor equipment and clothing. ... Peter Buck is a nuclear physicist and co-founder of the Subway restaurant chain. ... Exterior of a typical Subway restaurant in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico Locations of Subway stores Subway is the name of a multinational restaurant franchise that mainly sells sandwiches and salads. ... Kenneth Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current CEO (2001-present) of American Express. ... American Express (NYSE: AXP) is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Stanley Druckenmiller formerly managed money for George Soros, and now runs Duquesne Capital which he founded in 1981. ... George Soros George Soros (pronounced ) (born August 12, 1930, in Budapest, Hungary, as György Schwartz) is a Jewish-American financial speculator, stock investor, and liberal political activist. ... Richard Salsman is an an American economist and lecturer. ... Reed Hastings at the Web 2. ... Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) is the first and largest major online DVD rental service, offering flat rate rental-by-mail to customers in the United States. ...

Academia

Nathan Lord (1792 - 1870) was a U.S. Congregational clergyman and educator. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Alpheus Spring Packard, Sr. ... Andover Theological Seminary, now part of Andover Newton Theological School, is the oldest graduate school of theology in the United States. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe, born (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an abolitionist and writer of more than 13 books, the most famous being Uncle Toms Cabin which describes life in slavery, and which was first published in serial form from 1851... Cyrus Hamlin (1811-1900) was an American Congregational missionary and educator, the father of A. D. F. Hamlin, born in Waterford, Maine. ... Robert College is an American high school in Ä°stanbul, Turkey, the oldest American school still in existence in its original location outside the USA.[1] It was founded in 1863 by Christopher Robert, at the time of the Ottoman Empire. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural, and economic centre. ... Mead Chapel - Middlebury College Middlebury College is a small, highly selective liberal arts college located in the rural New England town of Middlebury, Vermont. ... Henry Boynton Smith ( November 21, 1815 - February 7, 1877), United States theologian, was born in Portland, Maine. ... Amherst College is an elite independent liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Disambiguation: This page refers to Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, an ecumenical seminary affiliated with Columbia University. ... Ezra Abbot (April 28, 1819, Jackson, Maine - March 21, 1884,Cambridge, Massachusetts) was an American biblical scholar. ... Harvard Divinity School Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Charles Carroll Everett (June 19, 1829 - October 16, 1900), American divine and philosopher, was born at Brunswick, Maine. ... Harvard Divinity School Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, ca. ... The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmens Bureau or (mistakenly) the Freedmans Bureau, was an agency of the government of the United States that was formed to aid distressed refugees of the United States Civil War, including former slaves and poor white... Howard University is a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... William Alfred Packard (1830-1909) was an American classical scholar, born at Brunswick, Me. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... Robert G. Albion (15 August 1896 - 9 August 1983) was the first Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs at Harvard University. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... Northeastern University (NU) is a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... Allegheny College is a small private liberal arts college located in Meadville, Pennsylvania located 90 miles north of Pittsburgh and 90 miles east of Cleveland. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... Richard E. Dick Morgan is a conservative author, contributing editor of City Journal, and the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Government at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. ... President of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, ME since 2001 Barry Mills is the president of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, a position he has held since 2001. ... Meredith Jung-En Woo is Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. ... Northwestern University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian research university, located in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois, U.S.. Northwesterns main campus is a 240-acre (970,000 m²) parcel in Evanston, along the shore of Lake Michigan. ... UM also has campuses in Dearborn and Flint. ...

Honorary Degree Recipients

Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American statesman and advocate for American slavery and for States Rights. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (April 3–April 10, 1865) Largest city New Orleans... Robert Frost (1941) Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... Amherst College is an elite independent liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 - October 19, 1945) was an American artist and illustrator. ... Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... E. Frederic Morrow (c. ... Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Maya Angelou (born Marguerite Johnson April 4, 1928) is an American poet, memoirist, actress and an important figure in the American Civil Rights Movement. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29 [1] [2], 1953) is an American documentary filmmaker. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form that originated around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans, rooted in African American musical styles blended with Western music technique and theory. ... Cornel West Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a prominent African-American scholar and public intellectual. ... Yale redirects here. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... Paul Martin Simon (November 29, 1928 - December 9, 2003) was an American politician from Illinois. ...

Notable Faculty Members and Trustees (Non-Graduates)

John Chandler (February 1, 1762—September 25, 1841) was an American politician and soldier of Maine. ... William King (1768-1862) was an American merchant, ship-builder, and statesman from Bath, Maine. ... Parker Cleaveland (1780-1858) was an American geologist and mineralogist, born in Rowley, Massachusetts. ... Andrews Norton (December 31, 1786_September 18, 1853) was, along with William Ellery Channing, the leader of mainstream Unitarianism of the early and middle nineteenth century. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... James Ware Bradbury (June 10, 1802–January 6, 1901) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Roswell Dwight Hitchcock (August 15, 1817 - June 16, 1887), American divine, was born at East Machias, Maine. ... Charles Abiathar White (1826-1910) was an American geologist, paleontologist, and writer whose publications total 238 titles. ... George Trumbull Ladd (19 January 1842 – 8 August 1921) was an American philosopher and psychologist. ... Maurice Roy Ridley (January 25, 1890 - June 12, 1969) was a writer and poet, Fellow and Chaplain of Balliol College, Oxford. ... Rex Warner (March 9, 1905 - June 24, 1986) was an English classicist, writer and translator. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Angus King Angus S. King, Jr. ... Paul N. Franco is a professor of government at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine and a leading authority on the British political philosopher Michael Oakeshott. ...

References

    1. ^ (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Marquis Who's Who.

 
 

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