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Encyclopedia > Liquid crystal display television

Liquid-crystal display televisions (LCD TV) are televisions that use LCD technology to produce an image. The technology used is generally TFT, because this allows for reduced size, especially depth reduction. Benefits also include lower weight and reduced energy consumpton when compared to other display types. LCD televisions by nature can be and are often used as computer monitors. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... LCD redirects here. ... This article is about TFT technology. ...


Early generation LCD televisions had drawbacks relative to traditional visual display technologies. Fast-moving images sometimes exhibited "ghosting" and, because light emitted focused directly ahead, viewing was best only when looking directly at the screen or from a very slight angle. Developments in recent years have solved most of these problems, and LCD televisions along with Plasma televisions have become more popular worldwide than CRT models. A plasma display is an emissive flat panel display where light is created by phosphors excited by a plasma discharge between two flat panels of glass. ... CRT can mean: Cathode Ray Tube, in electronics, a display device (such as those used in one type of television) C Run-Time, in computing Charitable Remainder Trust, in Law Chinese Remainder Theorem, in mathematics Corneal Refractive Therapy, in medicine Criterion-referenced test, in U.S. schools Critical race theory...


In the early 2000s, LCD flat-panels captured a large part of the computer monitor market from traditional CRTs, with benefits such as its reduced footprint and energy efficiency being favourable over the CRT design. Continuing advances in LCD technology enabled it to compete against other technologies. Plasma flat panels, rear-projection televisions, (DLP, and variants of LCD technology including LCD and LCoS) are alternative HDTV options. Flat panel displays encompass a growing number of technologies enabling video displays that are lighter and much thinner than traditional television and video displays using cathode ray tubes, usually less than 10 cm (4 inches) thick. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... An example of a plasma display A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display now commonly used for large TV displays (typically above 37-inch or 940 mm). ... Flat panel displays encompass a growing number of technologies enabling video displays that are lighter and much thinner than traditional television and video displays using cathode ray tubes, usually less than 10 cm (4 inches) thick. ... This article is about Digital Light Processing. ... An LCD projector is a type of video projector for displaying video, images or computer data on a screen or other flat surface. ... Liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS or LCoS) is a micro-projection or micro-display technology typically applied in projection televisions. ... High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ...


It had been widely believed that LCD technology was suited only to smaller sized flat-panel televisions at sizes of 40" or smaller. Early LCDs could not compete with plasma technology for screens larger than this because plasma held the edge in cost and performance. However, LCD TVs can now offer essentially the same performance. Flat panel displays encompass a growing number of technologies enabling video displays that are lighter and much thinner than traditional television and video displays using cathode ray tubes, usually less than 10 cm (4 inches) thick. ...


Current seventh-generation panels by major manufacturers such as Samsung, Sony, LG.Philips LCD, and the Sharp Corporation have announced larger sized models: Samsung Group is one of the largest South Korean business groupings. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... LG.Philips LCD (hangul:엘지필립스엘씨디, LG필립스LCD) was formed as a joint venture by the Korean electronics company LG Electronics and the Dutch company Koninklijke Philips Electronics in 1999 to manufacture active matrix liquid crystal displays (LCDs). ... Sharp Corporation ) (TYO: 6753 , LuxSE: SRP) is a Japanese electronics manufacturer, founded in 1912. ...

  • In October 2004, 40" to 45" televisions became widely available, and Sharp had announced the successful manufacture of a 65" panel.
  • In March 2005, Samsung announced an 82" LCD panel.[1]
  • In August 2006, LG.Philips Consumer Electronics announced a 100" LCD television[2]
  • In January 2007, Sharp displayed a 108" LCD panel branded under the AQUOS brand name at CES in Las Vegas.[3]

Manufacturers have announced plans to invest billions of dollars in LCD production over the next few years, with televisions expected to be a key market. Samsung Group is one of the largest South Korean business groupings. ... Company logo Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Royal Philips Electronics), usually known as Philips, is one of the largest consumer electronics producers in the world. ... Sharp Corporation ) (TYO: 6753 , LuxSE: SRP) is a Japanese electronics manufacturer, founded in 1912. ... The Sharp Aquos is a range of LCD televisions made by Sharp Corporation. ... The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is a trade show held each January in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is sponsored by the Consumer Electronics Association. ...


Improvements in LCD technology have narrowed the technological gap, allowing producers to offer lower weight and higher available resolution (crucial for HDTV), and lower power consumption. LCD TVs are now more competitive against plasma displays in the television set market. It is noted that LCDs are now overtaking plasmas, particularly in the important 40" and above segment where plasma had enjoyed strong dominance.[4][5] High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ...

Contents

LCD Technology

LCD technology is based on the properties of polarized light. Two thin, polarized panels sandwich a thin liquid-crystal gel that is divided into individual pixels. An X/Y grid of wires allows each pixel in the array to be activated individually. When an LCD pixel darkens, it polarizes at 90 degrees to the polarizing screens. In electrodynamics, polarization (also spelled polarisation) is the property of electromagnetic waves, such as light, that describes the direction of their transverse electric field. ... This article describes the unit of angle. ...


This pixel has darkened. The pixel darkens in proportion to the voltage applied to it: for a bright detail, a low voltage is applied to the pixel; for a dark shadow area, a higher voltage is applied. LCDs are not completely opaque to light, however; some light will always go through even the blackest LCD pixels. This article is about the picture element. ... Shadows on pavement A shadow is a region of darkness where light is blocked. ... LCD redirects here. ...


Developments in LCD televisions

TVs based on PVA and S-PVA LCD panels deliver a broad viewing angle, up to 178 degrees.[6] They also deliver an adequate contrast ratio for viewing bright scenes, as well as dark scenes in bright rooms. The dynamic contrast technique improves contrast when viewing dark scenes in a dark room. Alternatively, some manufacturers produce LCD TVs that throw light on the wall behind it to help make dark scenes look darker. PVA and S-PVA panels generally have difficulty with ghosting when going between different shades of dark colours, however in new televisions this is compensated to some degree using a technique called overdriving. A 15 TFT-LCD TFT-LCD (thin film transistor liquid crystal display) is a variant of liquid crystal display (LCD) which uses thin film transistor (TFT) technology to improve image quality. ... The contrast ratio is a measure of a display system, defined as the ratio of the luminosity of the brightest color (white) to that of the darkest color (black) that the system is capable of producing. ... The contrast ratio is a measure of a display system, defined as the ratio of the luminosity of the brightest color(White) to that of the darkest color(black) that the system is capable of producing. ...


Moving pictures on a CRT TV do not exhibit any sort of "ghosting" because the CRT's phosphor, charged by the strike of electrons, emits most of the light in a very short time, under 1 ms, compared with the refresh period of e.g. 20 ms (for 50 fps video). In LCDs, each pixel emits light of set intensity for a full period of 20 ms (in this example), plus the time it takes for it to switch to the next state, typically 12 to 25 ms.


The second time (called the "response time") can be shortened by the panel design (for black-to-white transitions), and by using the technique called overdriving (for black-to-gray and gray-to-gray transitions); however this only can go down to as short as the refresh period.


This is usually enough for watching film-based material, where the refresh period is so long (1/24 s, or nearly 42 ms), and jitter is so strong on moving objects that film producers actually almost always try to keep object of interest immobile in the film's frame.


Video material, shot at 50 or 60 frames a second, actually tries to capture the motion. When the eye of a viewer tracks a moving object in video, it doesn't jump to its next predicted position on the screen with every refresh cycle, but it moves smoothly; thus the TV must display the moving object in "correct" places for as long as possible, and erase it from outdated places as quickly as possible.


Although ghosting was a problem when LCD TVs were newer, the manufacturers have been able to shorten response time to 2ms on many computer monitors and around an average of 8 ms for TVs.


There are two emerging techniques to solve this problem. First, the backlight of the LCD panel may be fired during a shorter period of time than the refresh period, preferably as short as possible, and preferably when the pixel has already settled to the intended brightness. This technique resurrects the flicker problem of the CRTs, because the eye is able to sense flicker at the typical 50 or 60 Hz refresh rates.


Another approach is to double the refresh rate of the LCD panel, and reconstruct the intermediate frames using various motion compensation techniques, extensively tested on high-end "100 Hz" CRT televisions in Europe. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The best approach may be a combination of two, possibly allowing the viewer to switch them on or off when viewing video- or film-based material.


Some manufacturers are also experimenting with extending colour reproduction of LCD televisions. Although current LCD panels are able to deliver all sRGB colours using an appropriate combination of backlight's spectrum and optical filters, manufacturers want to display even more colours. One of the approaches is to use a fourth, or even fifth and sixth colour in the optical colour filter array. Another approach is to use two sets of suitably narrowband backlights (e.g. LEDs), with slightly differing colours, in combination with broadband optical filters in the panel, and alternating backlights each consecutive frame. The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Backlights are lights that are attached to LCD displays so that they can be seen at night. ... External links LEd Category: TeX ...


Fully using the extended colour gamut will naturally require an appropriately captured material and some modifications to the distribution channel. Otherwise, the only use of the extra colours would be to let the viewer boost the colour saturation of the TV picture beyond what was intended by the producer, but avoiding the otherwise unavoidable loss of detail ("burnout") in saturated areas. In color reproduction, including computer graphics and photography, the gamut, or color gamut (pronounced ), is a certain complete subset of colors. ...


See also

Ambilight Ambilight is a feature invented by Philips Electronics, generating light effects around the TV that matches the video contents. ... ATS euro plus is an automatic tuning system for convenient initial adjustment of the television set with sorting and channel identification specification in fixed sequence. ... This is a comparison of various properties of different display technologies. ... This article is about Digital Light Processing. ... Digital Terrestrial Television (DTTV or DTT) is an implementation of digital technology to provide a greater number of channels and/or better quality of picture and sound using aerial broadcasts to a conventional antenna (or aerial) instead of a satellite dish or cable connection. ... A Photomontage. ... Pixelplus, also called Pixel Plus, is a proprietary digital filter image processing technology developed by Philips which they claim enhances the display of analogue broadcast signals on their TVs. ... An example of a plasma display A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display now commonly used for large TV displays (typically above 37-inch or 940 mm). ... Progressive scan Progressive or noninterlaced scanning is any method for displaying, storing or transmitting moving images in which the lines of each frame are drawn in sequence. ... A BBC Ceefax page from January 9, 2007. ... Nintendo DS Touch screen A touch screen is an input/output device that allows the user to interact with the computer by touching the display screen. ... Wake Up may refer to: Wake Up, a 1972 song by Funkadelic Wake Up, a 1992 song by Rage Against the Machine Wake Up, a 1985 song by XTC Wake Up!, a 1995 album by The Boo Radleys Wake Up, a 2005 song by Hilary Duff This is a disambiguation... A sleep timer is a function on many modern televisions that shut off the power after a preset amount of time. ... Wide XGA (WXGA) is a set of non standard resolutions derived from the XGA display standard by widening it to a wide screen aspect ratio. ... Super Video Graphics Array, almost always abbreviated to Super VGA or just SVGA is a broad term that covers a wide range of computer display standards. ... For other meanings of DVI, please see DVI (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.samsung.com/PressCenter/PressRelease/PressRelease.asp?seq=20050307_0000101589
  2. ^ http://www.newscenter.philips.com/About/news/article-15499.html
  3. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,242431,00.html
  4. ^ http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9584_22-6138290.html
  5. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15916808/
  6. ^ http://hyundaiq.com/Eng/product/GoodsView.asp?GoodsCode=19&BigCode=B102&MiddleCode=M104&SmallCode=S110

External links

  • Plasma.com LCD TV vs PDP TV vs DLP TV
  • Unbeatable.co.uk Plasma Vs Lcd Televisions

  Results from FactBites:
 
Liquid crystal display television - Biocrawler (360 words)
Liquid crystal display television is, as indicated by its name, a television using LCD technology (generally TFT), as opposed to cathode ray or plasma for its visual output.
In October 2004, 40" to 45" televisions were widely available and Sharp Corporation had announced the successful manufacture of a 65" panel.
Perhaps the best-known brand of LCD televisions at present is Sharp's Aquos range.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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