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Encyclopedia > Liqueur
Bottles of strawberry liqueur
Bottles of strawberry liqueur

A liqueur is a sweet alcoholic beverage, often flavoured with fruits, herbs, spices, flowers, seeds, roots, plants, barks, and sometimes cream. The word liqueur comes from the Latin word liquifacere which means "to dissolve." This refers to the dissolving of the flavourings used to make the liqueur. Liqueurs are not usually aged for long periods of time, but may have resting periods during their production to allow flavors to marry. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x923, 140 KB) Bottles of homemade strawberry liqueur, photo credit: Blue Lotus File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Liqueur User:GeeJo/Gallery ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x923, 140 KB) Bottles of homemade strawberry liqueur, photo credit: Blue Lotus File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Liqueur User:GeeJo/Gallery ... Bottles of cachaça, a Brazilian alcoholic beverage. ... Popular Japanese fashion magazine throughout the 1990s; the photography of which has recently been reissued in two collections from Phaidon press. ... Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hə(ɹ)b, or əɹb; see pronunciation differences) are plants grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... Screen shot of Spice OPUS, a fork of Berkeley SPICE SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuits Emphasis) is a general purpose analog circuit simulator. ... A Phalaenopsis flower A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... Primary and secondary roots in a cotton plant In vascular plants, the root is that organ of a plant body that typically lies below the surface of the soil (compare with stem). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of bark, see Bark (disambiguation). ... Cream is a dairy product that is composed of the higher-butterfat layer skimmed from the top of milk before homogenization. ...


In some parts of the world people use the words cordial and liqueur interchangeably. Though in these places the two expressions both describe liquors made by redistilling spirits with aromatic flavorings and are usually highly sweetened, there are some differences. While liqueurs are usually flavored with herbs, cordials are generally prepared with fruit pulp or juices. Nearly all liqueurs are quite sweet, with a highly concentrated, dessert-like flavour. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Squash (drink). ...


Liqueurs date back centuries and are historical descendants of herbal medicines, often those prepared by monks, as Chartreuse or Bénédictine. Liqueurs were made in Italy as early as the 13th century and their consumption was later required at all treaty signings during the Middle Ages. [1] The term Herbalism refers to folk and traditional medicinal practice based on the use of plants and plant extracts. ... A monk is a person who practices asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... Bottle of Green Chartreuse Chartreuse is a French liqueur composed of distilled wine alcohol flavored with 130 herbal extracts. ... Bénédictine is a brandy-based herbal liqueur beverage produced in France. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


Today liqueurs are made worldwide and can be enjoyed many different ways, including by themselves, poured over ice, with coffee, and mixed with cream or other mixers to create cocktails. They are often served with or as a dessert. Liqueurs may also be used in cooking. In scuba diving, the word cocktail also means a hazard with diving with some rebreathers: it means a caustic solution resulting from water reaching and dissolving the absorbent. ... Cooking is the act of applying heat to food in order to prepare it to eat. ...


Some liqueurs are prepared by infusing certain woods, fruits, or flowers, in either water or alcohol, and adding sugar or other items. Others are distilled from aromatic or flavouring agents. The distinction between liqueur and spirits (sometimes liquors) is not simple, especially since many spirits are available in a flavoured form today. Flavored spirits, however, are not prepared by infusion. Alcohol content is not a distinctive feature. At 15 to 30%, most liqueurs have a lower alcohol content than spirits, but some liqueurs have an alcohol content as high as 55%. Dessert wine, on the other hand, may taste like a liqueur, but contains no additional flavouring. An infusion is a beverage made by steeping a flavoring substance in hot or boiling water. ... Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ... A Phalaenopsis flower A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... This article is about the chemical substances. ... Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a flammable, colorless, mildly toxic chemical compound with a distinctive perfume-like odor, and is the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. ... Magnification of typical sugar showing monoclinic hemihedral crystalline stucture. ... Laboratory distillation set-up using, without a fractionating column 1: Heat source 2: Still pot 3: Still head 4: Thermometer/Boiling point temperature 5: Condenser 6: Cooling water in 7: Cooling water out 8: Distillate/receiving flask 9: Vacuum/gas inlet 10: Still receiver 11: Heat control 12: Stirrer speed... Odor receptors on the antennae of a Luna moth An odor is the object of perception of the sense of olfaction. ... Spirits redirects here. ... Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a flammable, colorless, mildly toxic chemical compound with a distinctive perfume-like odor, and is the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. ... Dessert wines are those wines which are typically served with dessert, although they are also drunk on their own, i. ...


There are many categories of liqueurs including: fruit liqueur, cream liqueur, coffee liqueur, chocolate liqueur, schnapps liqueur, brandy liqueur, anise liqueur, nut flavoured liqueur, and herbal liqueur. A cup of coffee Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... Schnapps is a type of distilled beverage. ... Brandy pot stills at the Van Ryn Brandy Cellar near Stellenbosch, South Africa. ... Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the first syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... Hazelnuts from the Common Hazel Chestnut Carya ovata nut anatomy A nut is a seed of a plant. ...


Anise liqueurs have the interesting property of turning from translucent to cloudy when diluted: the oil of anise remains in solution when in the presence of a high concentration of alcohol, but crystallizes out of the solution when the alcohol concentration is reduced by dilution.


Floating liqueurs is a technique often used by bartenders to impress their customers. This is done by "floating" a measure of the desired liqueur in a glass by pouring it slowly over an inverted spoon or down a glass rod. This creates a rainbow effect in a glass when using different colored cordials.


See also

Liqueurs are high alcohol, high sugar beverages with added flavorings usually derived from herbs, fruits, or nuts. ... A variety of nalewkas in various stages of preparation. ... Sloe gin is a red colored liqueur flavored with sloe berries, the fruit of the blackthorn, a relative of the plum. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Squash (drink). ...

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Liqueur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (466 words)
Liqueurs are not usually aged for long periods of time, but may have resting periods during their production to allow flavors to marry.
Liqueurs were made in Italy as early as the 13th century.
Anise liqueurs have the interesting property of turning from translucent to cloudy when diluted: the oil of anise remains in solution when in the presence of a high concentration of alcohol, but crystallizes out of the solution when the alcohol concentration is reduced by dilution.
AllRefer.com - liqueur (Alcoholic Beverages) - Encyclopedia (328 words)
Liqueur can be produced by either macerating the flavoring elements in alcohol, which is then distilled or by percolation, which passes heated alcohol through the flavorings.
Liqueurs are usually served after dinner and sipped from small glasses, a process said to aid digestion.
Both Cointreau and Grand Marnier are types of curaCao, a liqueur flavored with the dried peel of the green oranges from the West Indian island of CuraCao.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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