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Encyclopedia > Lipoproteins

A lipoprotein is a biochemical assembly that contains both proteins and lipids and may be structural or catalytic in function. Lipoproteins may be enzymes, proton pumps, ion pumps, or some combination of these functions. Examples include the high density and low density lipoproteins of the blood and the transmembrane proteins of the mitochondrion and the chloroplast.


The lipids are often an essential part of the complex, even if they seem to have no catalytic activity themselves. To isolate transmembrane lipoproteins from their associated membranes, detergents are often needed.


All cells need fats and, for all animal cells, cholesterol to build the multiple membranes which cells use to both control water, and water soluble elements, and to organize their internal structure and protein enzymatic systems.


Lipoproteins in the blood carry fats around the body. The protein particles have charged groups aimed outward so as to attract water molecules; this makes them soluble in the salt water based blood pool. Triglyceride-fats and cholesterol are carried internally, shielded from the water.


The interaction of the proteins forming the surface of the particles with (a) enzymes in the blood, (b) with each other and (c) with specific proteins on the surfaces of cells determine whether triglycerides and cholesterol with be added to or removed from the lipoprotein transport particles.


Regarding atheroma development and progression vs. regression, the key issue has always been cholesterol transport patterns, not cholesterol concentration itself.


General Catagories of lipoproteins, listed in order from larger and less dense (more fat than protein) to smaller and more dense (more protein, less fat):


  Results from FactBites:
 
Patient Information - Lipoprotein Risk Factors (990 words)
Lipoproteins are tiny spherical particles which circulate in the blood.
Abnormalities of the amounts or kinds of lipoproteins in blood can cause increased risk of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries (leading to heart attack, angina or coronary pain, or sudden death) and atherosclerosis in many other arteries in the body (leading to stroke, aneurysm, or gangrene).
The risk from lipoprotein abnormalities can be especially severe, if a very high elevation of one type of lipoprotein is present, or if several lipoprotein abnormalities are found together in one person.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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