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Encyclopedia > Lip sync

Lip-sync or Lip-synch (short for lip synchronization) is a technical term for matching lip movements with voice. The term can refer to: a technique often used for performances in the production of film, video and television programs; the science of [[considered controversial although in many instances it is required from a production standpoint to ensure quality for broadcast or a performer may be harmonizing with their own vocals. Synchronization (or Sync) is a problem in timekeeping which requires the coordination of events to operate a system in unison. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ...

Contents

Lip-synching in music

Though lip-synching or lip singing can be used to make it appear as though actors have musical ability (e.g., The Partridge Family) or to misattribute vocals (e.g. Milli Vanilli), it is more often used by recording artists to create a particular effect, to enable them to perform live dance numbers, or to cover for illness or other deficiencies during live performance. Sometimes lip-synched performances are forced by television for short guest appearances, as it requires less time for rehearsals and hugely simplifies the process of sound mixing. The Partridge Family was an American television sitcom about a widowed mother and her five children living in San Pueblo, a small fictional town in Northern California, originally broadcast on ABC from 1970 to 1974. ... Milli Vanilli (milli is a word meaning national in Turkish, picked up by the artists while visiting Turkey on one of its national days) was a duo, Fabrice Morvan and Rob Pilatus, formed in Germany in the mid-1980s. ...


Because the film track and music track are recorded separately during the creation of a music video, artists usually lip-synch to their songs and often imitate playing musical instruments as well. Artists also sometimes move their lips at a faster speed from the track, to create an unusual effect in the final clip. A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ...


Artists often lip-synch during strenuous dance numbers in both live and recorded performances, due to lung capacity being needed for physical activity (both at once would require incredibly trained lungs). They may also lip-synch in situations in which their back-up bands and sound systems cannot be accommodated, such as the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade which features popular singers lip-synching while riding floats. For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... A float is a decorated platform, either built on a vehicle or towed behind one, which is a component of many festive parades, such as the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade and the Tournament of Roses Parade. ...


Some singers habitually lip-synch during live performance, both concert and televised. Others sing the lead part over a complete recording or over just pre-recorded music and backing vocals. Sometimes when this is done, the live vocals are less audible than the backing track. Some groups lip-synch supporting vocal parts or shared parts in order to maintain vocal harmony or to ensure balance of volume among several singers.


Some artists switch between live singing and lip-synching during performance, particularly during songs which require them to hit particularly high or low notes. Lip-synching these notes ensures that they will not be out of tune and that the artist will not strain their voice too much during an arduous concert. Once the difficult portion of the song has passed, the artist may continue to lip-synch or may resume singing live. Some artists such as Fergie lip-synch choruses during songs, but sing the main verses. Some artists such as Shakira do a wide range of different variations of lip-synching: from fully lip-synching to the original album track or a pre-recorded version, to lip-synching different parts of different songs (for example chorus and beginning phrase; a difficult part of melody), to having some of the instuments and back-up vocals (including the ones by the singer) being pre-recorded, to all singing and music being live. Fergie is a nickname, most frequently derived as a diminutive variant of the Scottish surname Ferguson. ... This article is about the musician. ...


Lip-synching is almost always used in musical films, such as La Vie en Rose and High School Musical ([[The In 1981 Wm. Randy Wood started Lip Sync contests at the Underground Nightclub in Seattle, Washington to attract customers. The contests were so popular he took the contests nationwide. By 1984 he had contests running in over 20 cities and after submitting a show proposal went to work for dick clark productions as consulting producer for the TV series Puttin' On the Hits. The show received an impressive 9.0 rating the first season and was nominated twice for the Daytime Emmy Awards. The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... La Vie en rose (literally Life in Pink) is the title in English-speaking territories for the triumphant Academy Award winning film La Môme, a 2007 French movie directed by Olivier Dahan about singer Édith Piaf, starring Marion Cotillard in her Academy Award, BAFTA, Czech Lion, and Golden Globe... For other uses, see High School Musical (disambiguation). ... Seattle redirects here. ... dick clark productions is an entertainment production company founded by entertainer Dick Clark. ...


The New York-based improv group Improv Everywhere cooperated with Ben Folds in an elaborate prank to open Folds' show in November 2006. A member of the troupe walked in to the piano, introduced as Ben Folds, and lip-synched and pretended to play along with similarly counterfeit band members to a prerecorded Ben Folds song (his cover of The Cure's "In Between Days"). Since the lighting intentionally obscured the stand-in's face, the audience naturally assumed Folds himself was playing live. About a minute or so into the performance, the backing track began to skip - as a damaged compact disc would - and the band halted the performance. The band pretended to start the same song again (miming to the same track), before the song cut out completely. At around this point, as the stand-in looks below the piano for any disconnected cables, the gag is revealed: the lighting comes up to reveal the stand-in is not Folds, "security guards" arrive to carry the man offstage, the actual Folds comes on-stage to punch the man, and the actual live performance proceeds. [1] [2] Improv Everywhere is an unorthodox comedy group based in New York City, formed in 2001 by one Charlie Todd. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1] is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ...


During Polish group Kanał Audytywny’s performance on Kuba Wojewódzki's talk-show (video), the trumpeter held his trumpet backwards and band members wore helmets labeled PLAYBACK, the Polish name for lip-synched performance. Kuba Wojewódzki Jakub WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Wojewódzki (born on August 2, 1963 in Koszalin, Poland) – Polish journalist, showman and comedian. ... A talk show (American) or chat show (British) is a television or radio program where one person or group of people come together to discuss various topics put forth by a talk show host. ...


On at least one occasion, John Lennon of The Beatles intentionally revealed that the group was lip-synching; during the performance, he scratched his face, licked his lips, mimed incorrect words, and began dancing while playing his instrument. One such instance, as seen on Ready Steady Go in 1964, can be seen here. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Ready Steady Go or simply RSG was one of the UKs first rock / pop music TV programmes. ...


A video recording of the band Iron Maiden exists, where the band members constantly switched instruments and goofed around the stage during a lip-synched performance on German TV. Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... TV redirects here. ...


The practice of synching also occurs in musical theater, for much the same purpose as for musicians. A production may include a mix of lip-synched and live musical numbers. In long-running shows, this may be done to help protect the performer's voice from strain and damage, as well as to maintain a high caliber of production. A notable example of using lip-synching as a special effect includes performances of The Phantom of the Opera, where swing actors in the same costume as the lead actors, to give the illusion of the characters moving around the stage with some mystery. The Phantom of the Opera is a musical and operetta by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel by French novelist Gaston Leroux. ...


Non-professionals often use lip-synching as a form of musical pantomime in which the performer moves his lips to a musical recording done by someone else. This form of lip-synching is often performed by drag queens and, more recently, drag kings. Drag artist Lypsinka. ... A drag king performance troupe NYC Drag King Alliance Switch NPlay photo:Jenny Norris Drag kings are mostly female-bodied or -identified performance artists who dress in masculine drag and personify male gender stereotypes as part of their performance. ...


In the United States, this hobby reached its peak during the 1980s, when several game shows, such as Puttin' on the Hits and Lip Service, were created. A hobby is a spare-time recreational pursuit. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Lip service is the name of the situation in which someone complies with a certain obligation, or expectation, they have been subjected to, to the minimum possible extent. ...


Lip-synching in films

In film production lip synching is often part of the post-production phase. Most film today contains scenes where the dialogue has been re-recorded afterwards, lip-synching is the technique used when animated characters speak, and lip synching is essential when films are dubbed into other languages. Film production on location in Newark, New Jersey. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


ADR

Automated dialogue replacement, also known as "ADR" or "looping," is a film sound technique involving the re-recording of dialogue after photography. It is called post-synchronisation (post-sync) in the UK. In filmmaking, dubbing is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ...


Animation

The other is the art of making a character appear to speak in a prerecorded track of dialogue. The lip sync technique to make an animated character appear to speak involves figuring out the timings of the speech (breakdown) as well as the actual animating of the lips/mouth to match the dialogue track. The earliest examples of lip-sync in animation were attempted by Max Fleischer in his 1926 short My Old Kentucky Home. The technique continues to this day, with animated films and television shows such as Shrek, Lilo & Stitch, and The Simpsons using lip-synching to make their artificial characters talk. Lip synching is also used in comedies such as This Hour Has 22 Minutes and political satire, changing totally or just partially the original wording. It has been used in conjunction with translation of films from one language to another, for example, Spirited Away. Lip-synching can be a very difficult issue in translating foreign works to a domestic release, as a simple translation of the lines often leaves overrun or underrun of high dialog to mouth movements. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Dialogue (disambiguation). ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Max Fleischer (July 19, 1883–September 11, 1972) was an important pioneer in the development of the animated cartoon. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... My Old Kentucky Home, originally released on April 13, 1926, by Max Fleischers Out of the Inkwell Films company, was one of the Song Car-Tunes series. ... For other uses, see Shrek (disambiguation). ... For the television series, see Lilo & Stitch: The Series Lilo & Stitch is a 2002 American animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on June 21, 2002. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This Hour Has 22 Minutes is a weekly Canadian television comedy that airs on CBC Television. ... Spirited Away , literally Sen and Chihiros Spiriting Away) is an Academy Award winning 2001 film by the Japanese anime studio Studio Ghibli, written and directed by famed animator Hayao Miyazaki. ...


Language dubbing

Quality film dubbing requires that the dialogue is first translated in such a way that the words used can match the lip movements of the actor. This is often impossible to achieve if the translation is to stay true to the original dialogue. Elaborate lip-synch of dubbing is also a very lengthy and expensive process. In filmmaking, dubbing or looping is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ...


In English-speaking countries, many foreign TV series, especially Japanese anime, are dubbed to be put on television. However, cinematic releases of films tend to come with subtitles instead. The same is true of countries in which a language is spoken that is not spoken widely enough to make the expensive dubbing commercially viable (in other words, there is not enough market for it). Animé redirects here. ...


However, most non-English-speaking countries with a large enough population dub all foreign films into their national language before releasing them to cinemas. In such countries, people are accustomed to dubbed films so much that somewhat less than optimal matches between the lip movements and the speech are not generally noticed. At the same time, they are unaccustomed to subtitles, so they tend to find them distracting because they lack the skills to follow the on-screen action and the subtitles at the same time.


Lip-synching in video games

Early video games did not feature prominent use of voice, mainly being text-based. At most, games featured some generic jaw or mouth movement to convey a communication process in addition to text. However, as games become more advanced, lip sync and voice acting has become a major focus of many games. This article is about computer and video games. ...


Role-playing games

Lip sync is a minor focus in role-playing games. Because of the sheer amount of information conveyed through the game, the majority of communication is done through the use of scrolling text. Most RPGs rely solely on text, while some games display inanimate portraits to provide a better sense of who is speaking. Some games make use of some voice acting, such as Grandia II, but due to simple character models, there is no mouth movement to simulate speech. RPGs are still largely based on text, with the rare use of lip sync and voice files being reserved for full motion video cutscenes. Some newer RPGs, however, use full voice overs. These games are typically for computers or next gen systems and include such games as Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic and The Elder Scrolls: Oblivion. In these full voice over games, lip sync is crucial. Computer role-playing games (CRPGs), often shortened to simply role-playing games (RPGs), are a type of video or computer game that traditionally use gameplay elements found in paper-and-pencil role-playing games. ... Grandia II ) is a video game in the Grandia series made by Game Arts. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ...


Strategy games

Unlike RPGs, strategy games make extensive use of sound files to create an immersive battle environment. Most games simply played a recorded audio track on cue with some games providing inanimate portraits to accompany the respective voice. StarCraft used full motion video character portraits with several generic speaking animations that did not synchronize with the lines spoken in the game. The game did, however, make extensive use of recorded speech to convey the game's plot, with the speaking animations providing a good idea of the flow of the conversation. Warcraft III used fully rendered 3D models to animate speech with generic mouth movements, both as character portraits as well as the in-game units. Like the FMV portraits, the 3D models did not synchronize with actual spoken text, while in-game models tended to simulate speech by moving their heads and arms rather than using actual lip synchronization. Similarly, the game Codename Panzers uses camera angles and hand movements to simulate speech, as the characters have no actual mouth movement. Strategy games are typically board games, video or computer games with the players decision-making skills having a high significance in determining the outcome. ... “Starcraft” redirects here. ... Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos, released by Blizzard Entertainment in 2002, is a real-time strategy computer game // Overview An in-game screenshot of humans (blue) fighting orcs (red). ... Panzers is a popular World War II computer game created by Hungarian game developer Stormregion. ...


First-person shooters

FPS is a genre that generally places much more emphasis on graphical display, mainly due to the camera almost always being very close to character models. Due to increasingly detailed character models requiring animation, FPS developers assign many resources to create realistic lip synchronization with the many lines of speech used in most FPS games. Early 3D models used basic up-and-down jaw movements to simulate speech. As technology progressed, mouth movements began to closely resemble real human speech movements. Medal of Honor: Frontline dedicated a development team to lip sync alone, producing the most accurate lip synchronization for games at that time. Since then, games like Medal of Honor: Pacific Assault and Half-Life 2 have made use of coding that dynamically simulates mouth movements to produce sounds as if they were spoken by a live person, resulting in astoundingly life-like characters. To date, the most accurate lip synching in any video game was displayed in a video featuring the new lip synching technology used in the co-op FPS Team Fortress 2. Gamers who create their own videos using character models with no lip movements, such as the helmeted Master Chief from Halo, improvise lip movements by moving the characters' arms, bodies and making a bobbing movement with the head (see Red vs. Blue). Medal of Honor: Frontline is the first installment of Electronic Arts popular Medal of Honor series for the Sony PlayStation 2, Microsoft Xbox, and Nintendo GameCube video game systems. ... Medal of Honor: Pacific Assault is a game developed by Electronic Arts as part of the Medal of Honor series for the PC. The newest edition puts the player in the role Tommy Conlin, a U.S. Marine soldier in the Pacific theater of World War II. It also uses... Half-Life 2 (commonly abbreviated to HL2) is a science fiction first-person shooter computer game that is the sequel to Half-Life. ... Team Fortress 2 is a multiplayer, team-based, first-person shooter, developed by Valve Corporation as part of the game compilation The Orange Box. ... A scene from the popular machinima series Red vs. ... Master Chief Petty Officer John-117, commonly called Master Chief and John alternatively, is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the Halo universe, created by Bungie Studios, and is a player character in the trilogy of science fiction first-person shooter video games Halo: Combat Evolved, Halo 2... Halo is video game series created by Bungie Studios. ... For divisions in United States politics, see Red states and blue states. ...


Television transmission synchronization

Main article: Audio to video synchronization

An example of a lip synchronization problem, also known as lip sync error is the case in which television video and audio signals are transported via different facilities (e.g., a geosynchronous satellite radio link and a landline) that have significantly different delay times, respectively. In such cases it is necessary to delay the earlier of the two signals electronically to allow for the difference in propagation times. See also audio video sync and audio synchronizer. A geosynchronous satellite is a satellite whose orbital track on the Earth repeats regularly over points on the Earth over time. ... In its general sense, delay refers to a lapse of time. ... Look up propagation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that A/V sync be merged into this article or section. ... An audio synchronizer is a variable audio delay utilized to correct or maintain audio video sync or timing[2]also known as lip sync error [3]. See for example the specification given for audio to video timing given in ATSC Document IS-191[1]. Modern television systems utilize large amounts...


Lip sync issues have become a serious problem for the television industry world wide. Lip sync problems are not only annoying, but can lead to subconscious viewer stress which in turn leads to viewer dislike of the television program they are watching.[3] Television industry standards organizations have become involved in setting standards for lip sync errors.[4]


See also

A Lip dub is a type of video that combines lip syncing and audio dubbing to make a music video. ... A playback singer is a singer whose song is pre-recorded for use in films. ...

References

  1. ^ http://youtube.com/watch?v=Dk4Yv8u9cyo Video of the incident on YouTube
  2. ^ Ben Folds Fake at Improv Everywhere
  3. ^ "Effects of Audio-Video Asynchrony on Viewer's Memory, Evaluation of Content and Detection Ability" by Reeves and Voelker.
  4. ^ ATSC Document IS-191 ([1])

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lip Sync Measurement - Lip Sync Evaluation - Lip Sync Monitoring (286 words)
The causes are many, but lip sync measurement solutions are hard to find.
The human studies conducted for sensitivity to lip sync have shown that a drift where the audio is late is not as annoying as the audio arriving early.
This allows the broadcaster to make several Lip Sync measurements to see where the audio and video start to drift from each other.
Lip Sync Error Fix. Digital Audio Delay - Plasma TV, LCD, DLP - Felston (351 words)
Felston's digital audio delays solve the frustrating problem of lip sync error for anyone with an AV amplifier or home theater system.
Lip sync error affects a huge number of users of modern plasma TVs, LCD screens, DLP TVs and digital projectors.
There are many causes of lip sync error, where the sound is heard slightly ahead of a person's lips moving.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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