FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Linn Boyd

Linn Boyd (November 22, 1800December 17, 1859) was a prominent U.S. politician of the 1840s and 1850s, and served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1855. Boyd was elected to the House as a Democrat from Kentucky from 1835 to 1837 and again from 1839 to 1855, serving seven terms in the House. November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... ... Representative Dennis Hastert of Illinois is currently the Speaker of the House of Representatives. ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Boyd served in the Kentucky House of Representatives after first winning election in 1827. He represented Calloway County and his father represented neighboring Trigg County. In 1831 Boyd moved to Trigg County and was elected to the House again from there. Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ...


In 1833 Boyd lost his first campaign for the United States House of Representatives. In 1835 he was elected to the House and served there until 1837 when a Whig landslide cost him his seat. Boyd soon returned to the House, serving from 1839 through 1855. He was a strong supporter of President Andrew Jackson. Boyd played a key role in manuevering the annexation of Texas through Congress during the term of President John Tyler in 1845. Boyd was also important in getting the Compromise of 1850, chiefly credited to Henry Clay, passed through Congress. Largely though his prominence in sheperding the Compromise of 1850 to passage, Boyd was elected Speaker of the House in 1851 and held that office until 1855. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ... ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... The Compromise of 1850, in the history of the United States, was a series of Congressional legislative measures addressing slavery and the boundaries of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War (1846–48). ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... The Compromise of 1850, in the history of the United States, was a series of Congressional legislative measures addressing slavery and the boundaries of territories acquired during the Mexican-American War (1846–48). ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ...


In 1856 Boyd was put forth as a candidate for Vice President of the United States but was not nominated or elected. The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ...


Boyd was elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1859 but died shortly thereafter. This became significant with the onset of the Civil War. Governor Beriah Magoffin, supportive of slavery, secession and states' rights, became increasingly unpopular and distrusted as Kentucky sought to maintain a neutral course between the Union and the Confederate States of America. Unionists held a two-thirds majority in both houses of the Kentucky General Assembly in summer 1861 and frequently overrode Magoffin's vetos. By August 1862 Magoffin made it clear that he was willing to resign the governorship. However, due to Linn Boyd's death, the person next in line to become Governor of Kentucky was Speaker of the Senate John F. Fisk, who was unacceptable to Magoffin. Fisk resigned as Speaker and was replaced by James F. Robinson. Magoffin resigned; Robinson became governor and Fisk was reinstalled as Speaker of the Senate. The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... Beriah Magoffin was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (i. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured May... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Speaker of the Senate is a title given to the presiding officer of the Senate in a minority of jurisdictions. ... Speaker of the Senate is a title given to the presiding officer of the Senate in a minority of jurisdictions. ...


Had Boyd lived, he almost certainly would have served as Governor of Kentucky. This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ...

Preceded by:
Howell Cobb
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
December 1, 1851March 3, 1853;
December 5, 1853March 3, 1855
Succeeded by:
Nathaniel P. Banks
Preceded by:
James G. Hardy
Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
1859
Succeeded by:
Richard Taylor Jacob
Speakers of the United States House of Representatives Seal of the United States House of Representatives
Muhlenberg | Trumbull | Muhlenberg | Dayton | Sedgwick | Macon | Varnum | Clay | Cheves | Clay | Taylor | Barbour | Clay | Taylor | Stevenson | Bell | Polk | Hunter | White | Jones | Davis | Winthrop | Cobb | Boyd | Banks | Orr | Pennington | Grow | Colfax | Pomeroy | Blaine | Kerr | Randall | Keifer | Carlisle | Reed | Crisp | Reed | Henderson | Cannon | Clark | Gillett | Longworth | Garner | Rainey | Byrns | Bankhead | Rayburn | Martin | Rayburn | Martin | Rayburn | McCormack | Albert | O'Neill | Wright | Foley | Gingrich | Hastert

  Results from FactBites:
 
Linn Boyd Information (465 words)
Linn Boyd (November 22, 1800–December 17, 1859) was a prominent U.S. politician of the 1840s and 1850s, and served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1855.
Boyd was elected to the House as a Democrat from Kentucky from 1835 to 1837 and again from 1839 to 1855, serving seven terms in the House.
Largely though his prominence in shepherding the Compromise of 1850 to passage, Boyd was elected Speaker of the House in 1851 and held that office until 1855.
Linn Boyd, (1)Alice C. Bennett,(2)Anna Rhey Dixon (640 words)
Linn Boyd was born in Nashville, Tennessee on 22 November 1800 to Abraham and Elizabeth Linn of Davidson County, TN.
At age 19 Linn Boyd was a United States Commissioner (1819) and negotiated a treaty with the Chickasaw Indians for land near the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.
Boyd moved to the Jackson purchase in Kentucky and farmed in Calloway County in 1826.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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