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Encyclopedia > Linear B
Linear B
Type Syllabic with additional logographic signs
Languages Mycenaean
Time period
Parent systems Perhaps Linear A
Linear B
Unicode range U+10000–U+1007F syllabic signs
U+10080–U+100FF logograms
ISO 15924 Linb

Linear B is a script that was used for writing Mycenaean, an early form of Greek. It predated the Greek alphabet by several centuries: it seems to have died out with the fall of Mycenaean civilization; the intervening period, in which there is no evidence of written language, is known as the Greek Dark Ages. Mycenaean is the most ancient attested form of the Greek language, spoken on the Greek mainland and on Crete in the 16th to 11th centuries BC, before the Dorian invasion. ... Unicode’s Universal Character Set potentially supports over 1 million code points (1,114,112 = 220 + 216 or 17 × 216, hexadecimal 110000) code points. ... ISO 15924, Codes for the representation of names of scripts, defines two sets of codes for a number of writing systems (scripts). ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of the sounds of human speech. ... Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A syllabary is a set of written symbols that represent (or approximate) syllables, which make up words. ... linear_b is the ECMAScript engine of the Opera Web browser. ... ECMAScript is a scripting programming language, standardized by Ecma International in the ECMA-262 specification. ... Mycenaean is the most ancient attested form of the Greek language, spoken on the Greek mainland and on Crete in the 16th to 11th centuries BC, before the Dorian invasion. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... The Greek Dark Ages (ca. ...


The script appears to be related to Linear A, an undeciphered earlier script used for writing the Minoan language, and the later Cypriot syllabary; derivation from another writing system is held to be the reason for its poor compliance with the phonemic principle. It is partly syllabic, with additional logographic signs that are "determinative", or "designational" (yielding "classes", and "types"). As such, it rather resembles modern Japanese writing in graphemic structure. Linear A incised on tablets found in Akrotiri, Santorini. ... The Minoan language is a non-Hellenic language of Crete that was spoken before the invasion of Mycenaean armies. ... The Cypriot syllabary is a syllabic script used in Iron Age Cyprus, from ca. ... A phonemic orthography is a writing system where the written graphemes correspond to phonemes, the spoken sounds of the language. ... A syllabary is a set of written symbols that represent (or approximate) syllables, which make up words. ... A Chinese logogram A logogram, or logograph, is a single written character which represents a word or a morpheme (a meaningful unit of language). ... Nihongo in kanji This article describes the modern Japanese writing system and its history. ...

Contents

The script

Linear B has roughly 200 signs, divided into syllabic signs with phonetic values and logograms (or ideograms) with semantic values.

History of the
Greek language

(see also: Greek alphabet)
Proto-Greek (c. 2000 BC)
Mycenaean (c. 1600–1100 BC)
Ancient Greek (c. 800–300 BC)
Dialects:
Aeolic, Arcadocypriot, Attic-Ionic,
Doric, Pamphylian; Homeric Greek.
Possible dialect: Macedonian.

Koine Greek (from c. 300 BC)
Medieval Greek (c. 330–1453)
Modern Greek (from 1453)
Dialects:
Cappadocian, Cretan, Cypriot,
Demotic, Griko, Katharevousa,
Pontic, Tsakonian, Yevanic

This article is an overview of the history of Greek. ... Greek ( IPA: or IPA: — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in that language family. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... The Proto-Greek language is the common ancestor of the Greek dialects, including the Mycenean language, the classical Greek dialects Attic-Ionic, Aeolic, Doric and North-Western Greek, and ultimately the Koine and Modern Greek. ... Mycenaean is the most ancient attested form of the Greek language, spoken on the Greek mainland and on Crete in the 16th to 11th centuries BC, before the Dorian invasion. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Distribution of Greek dialects, ca. ... Aeolic Greek is a linguistic term used to describe a set of rather archaic Greek sub-dialects, spoken mainly in Boeotia (a region in Central Greece), in Lesbos (an island close to Asia Minor) and in other Greek colonies. ... Arcadocypriot was an ancient Greek dialect spoken in Arcadia and Cyprus between ca. ... Attic Greek is the ancient dialect of the Greek language that was spoken in Attica, which includes Athens. ... Distribution of Greek dialects, ca. ... Distribution of Greek dialects, ca. ... Pamphylian is a little-attested dialect of Ancient Greek which was spoken in Pamphylia, on the southern coast of Asia Minor. ... Homeric Greek is the form of Ancient Greek that was used by Homer in the Iliad and Odyssey. ... Koine redirects here. ... Medieval Greek (Μεσαιωνική Ελληνική) is a linguistic term that describes the fourth period in the history of the Greek language. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... Cappadocian, also known as Cappadocian Greek or Asia Minor Greek, is a dialect of the Greek language, formerly spoken in Cappadocia (Central Turkey). ... Cretan Greek (Cretan dialect, Greek: Κρητική διάλεκτος or Kritika Κρητικά) is a dialect of the Greek language, spoken by more than half a million people in Crete and several thousands in the diaspora. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... Griko, sometimes spelled Grico, is a Modern Greek dialect which is spoken by people in the Magna Graecia region in southern Italy and Sicily, and it is otherwise known as the Grecanic language. ... Katharevousa (Greek Καθαρεύουσα, IPA: ) is a form of the Greek language, created during the early 19th century by Adamantios Korais (1748-1833). ... Pontic Greek is a form of the Greek language originally spoken on the shores of the Black Sea, the Pontus, today mainly in Greece. ... Tsakonian (also Tsakonic) (Standard Greek Τσακωνική Διάλεκτος — Tsakonic language — is a dialect of, or language closely related to, Standard Modern Greek, spoken in the Tsakonian region of the Peloponnese, Greece. ... Yevanic, otherwise known as Yevanika, Romaniote and Judeo-Greek, was the language of the Romaniotes, the group of Greek Jews whose existence in Greece is documented since the 4th century BCE. Its linguistic lineage stems from Attic Greek and the Hellenistic Koine (Κοινή Ελ&#955...

Syllabic signs

-a -e -i -o -u
𐀀 a 𐀁 e 𐀂 i 𐀃 o 𐀄 u
d- 𐀅 da 𐀆 de 𐀇 di 𐀈 do 𐀉 du
j- 𐀊 ja 𐀋 je 𐀍 jo 𐀎 ju
k- 𐀏 ka 𐀐 ke 𐀑 ki 𐀒 ko 𐀓 ku
m- 𐀔 ma 𐀕 me 𐀖 mi 𐀗 mo 𐀘 mu
n- 𐀙 na 𐀚 ne 𐀛 ni 𐀜 no 𐀝 nu
p- 𐀞 pa 𐀟 pe 𐀠 pi 𐀡 po 𐀢 pu
q- 𐀣 qa 𐀤 qe 𐀥 qi 𐀦 qo
r- 𐀨 ra 𐀩 re 𐀪 ri 𐀫 ro 𐀬 ru
s- 𐀭 sa 𐀮 se 𐀯 si 𐀰 so 𐀱 su
t- 𐀲 ta 𐀳 te 𐀴 ti 𐀵 to 𐀶 tu
w- 𐀷 wa 𐀸 we 𐀹 wi 𐀺 wo
z- 𐀼 za 𐀽 ze 𐀿 zo

The names of these signs are only roughly phonetical, since most are used to represent a whole class of syllables each, see Mycenaean language. Note that "j" represents the semivowel equivalent to English "y", and is used as a glide (e.g. -a-jo for -αῖος), the "r" characters were used to write both the /r/ and /l/ phonemes, and the "q" series is used for Proto-Indo-European /kʷ/, /gʷ/, and /gʷʰ/, the latter being devoiced to /kʷʰ/ in Proto-Greek. There are some additional syllabic signs, the values of some of which are unknown, disputed, or infrequent. They are referred to either by a number, or by some hypothetical phonetic approximation, for example 64, a2, a3, au, nwa, pu2, etc. Mycenaean is the most ancient attested form of the Greek language, spoken on the Greek mainland and on Crete in the 16th to 11th centuries BC, before the Dorian invasion. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... The Proto-Greek language is the common ancestor of the Greek dialects, including the Mycenean language, the classical Greek dialects Attic-Ionic, Aeolic, Doric and North-Western Greek, and ultimately the Koine and Modern Greek. ...


The writing system is apparently an offshoot of Linear A, which, having been apparently designed to write the Minoan language, did not fit the sounds of Greek too well. The Myceneans who used the syllabary had to work around this, until several hundred years later, when the first Greek alphabet was developed. Linear A incised on tablets found in Akrotiri, Santorini. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ...


Ideograms

Due to the nature of the texts preserved, ideographic representations of items counted are very frequent. Not all of their values are known, and their pronunciation is, at best, the object of educated guessing. The ideograms represent concepts such as MAN, WOMAN, COW, BULL, OIL, WINE, CLOTH, GOLD, BRONZE etc. There are several dozen signs representing various kinds of pots and vessels. (Example: tripod, for ti-ri-po-de, followed by the logogram for "3-footed pot".)


The numerical references for the ideograms was devised by Ventris and Bennett, divided into functional groups corresponding to the breakdown in Bennett's index. These groups are numbered beginning 100, 110, 120 etc., with some provision of spare numbers for future additions. Unicode (as of version 5.0) encodes 123 Linear B ideograms.

glyph codepoint Bennett meaning
people and animals
𐂀 U+10080 100A man
𐂁 U+10081 102 A woman
𐂂 U+10082 104 Cn deer
𐂃 U+10083 105 Ca equid
𐂄 U+10084 105b Ca mare
𐂅 U+10085 105a Ca stallion
𐂆 U+10086 106b C-D ewe
𐀥 U+10025 *21 sheep
*75 yearling?
𐂇 U+10087 106a C-D ram
𐂈 U+10088 107b C-Mc nanny goat
𐂉 U+10089 107a C billy goat
𐁒 U+10052 *22 goat
𐂊 U+1008A 108b C sow
𐂋 U+1008B 108a C boar
𐁂 U+10042 *85 C pig
𐂌 U+1008C 109b C cow
𐂍 U+1008D 109a C bull
𐀘 U+10018 *23 ox
units of measurement
110 volume
111 volume
112 dry
113 liquid
114 weight
115 weight
116 weight
117 weight
118 talent
by dry measure
𐂎 U+1008E 120 E-F wheat
𐂏 U+1008F 121 F barley
𐂐 U+10090 122 F-U olive
𐂑 U+10091 123 G-Un spice
124 G cyperus
𐂒 U+10092 125 F cyperus?
126 F cyperus+ku
𐂓 U+10093 127 Un fruit?
𐂔 U+10094 128 G safflower
weapons
𐃆 U+100C6 230 R spear
𐃇 U+100C7 231 R arrow
𐃈 U+100C8 232 Ta double axe?
𐃉 U+100C9 233 Ra sword
chariots
𐃌 U+100cc 240 Sc wheeled chariot
𐃍 U+100CD 241 Sd Se wheel-less chariot
𐃎 U+100CE 242 Sf Sg chariot frame
𐃏 U+100CF 243 Sa So wheel

Archives

Corpus

The tablets are classified by the location of their excavation.

  • KN Knossos: ca. 4360 tablets (not counting finds of Linear A, etc)
  • PY Pylos : 1087 tablets
  • TH Thebes: 99 tablets + 238 published in 2002.
  • MY Mycenae: 73 tablets
  • TI Tiryns: 27 tablets.
  • KH Chania: 4 tablets
  • another 170 inscriptions in Linear B were found on vessels.

The publication of the Thebes tablets (L. Godart and A. Sacconi, 2002) was long anticipated, and their actual content was rather disappointing compared to what had been hinted at by the editors in the previous years. A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... Pylos (Greek Πύλος), formerly Navarino, is the name of a bay and a town on the west coast of the Peloponnese, in the district of Messenia in southern Greece. ... Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — Thēbai or Thíve) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Plan of Tiryns excavations Tiryns (in ancient Greek Τίρυνς and in modern Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archeological site in the Greek nomos of Argolis in the Peloponnese peninsula, some kilometres north of Nauplion. ... The lighthouse in the Venetian harbour, a landmark of Chania Chania (IPA , Greek: Χανιά, also transliterated as Hania, older form Chanea and Venetian: Canea, Godart and Olivier abbreviation: KH, Ottoman Turkish: خانيه Hanya) is the second largest city of Crete and the capital of the Chania Prefecture. ... The Thebes tablets are clay tablets, discovered in the city of Thebes, with inscriptions in the Mycenaean language in the Linear B script, dating to the 13th century BC. A substantial portion, some 250 tablets, amounting roughly to 5% of the entire Mycenaean corpus, was discovered by Vassilis L. Aravantinos... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


If it is genuine, the Kafkania pebble, dated to the 17th century BC, would be the oldest known Mycenean inscription, and hence the earliest preserved testimony of the Greek language. both sides of the pebble The Kafkania pebble was found in Kafkania, some 7 km north of Olympia, in 1994. ... // Overview Events 1700 – 1500 BC -- Hurrian conquests. ...


Chronology

According to Cynthia Shelmerdine (as summarised in "Where Do We Go From Here?"), the main archives for Linear B are associated with these stages of Late Minoan and Helladic pottery: The Helladic is a modern term to identify a sequence of periods characterizing the culture of mainland ancient Greece during the Bronze Age. ...


LM II:

  • Knossos, Room of the Chariot Tablets

LM IIIA2 or IIIB:

  • Knossos, main archive

LM IIIB:

  • Chania, tablet Sq 1, also 6659 and KH 3 (possibly Linear B)

end LH/LM IIIB1:

  • Chania, tablets Ar 3, Gq 5, X 6
  • Mycenae, tablets from Oil Merchant group of houses
  • Thebes, Ug tablets and Wu sealings

end LH IIIB2:

  • Mycenae, tablets from the Citadel
  • Tiryns, all tablets
  • Thebes, Of tablets and new Pelopidou Street deposit
  • Pylos, all but five tablets

LM III is equivalent to LH III from a chronological perspective.


Majority opinion dates the main archive of Knossos to LM IIIA:2 (the 14th century BC).


"LM" IIIB's material culture represents Cretan alternatives to LH ware, and is not homogenous (and since it was not controlled by Knossos, it is retains the title "Minoan" only as shorthand).


As for LH IIIB: it likely begins in the 1310s or 1300s BC, after Mursilis II's sack of Miletus; it ends around 1200 BC. Mursili II was a king of the Hittite empire (New kingdom) 1322 BC–1285 BC. He was a son of Suppiluliuma I. Categories: People stubs | Hittite kings ... The lower half of the benches and the remnants of the scene building of the theater of Miletus (August 2005) Miletus (Hittite: Milawata or Millawanda, Greek: Μίλητος transliterated Miletos, Turkish: Milet) was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia (in what is now the Aydin Province of Turkey...


Contents

The major cities and palaces used Linear B for records of disbursements of goods. Wool, sheep, and grain were some common items, often given to groups of religious people and also to groups of "men watching the coastline".


The tablets were kept in groups in baskets on shelves. When some of the palaces burned in large-scale fires precipitated by earthquakes or volcanic events (see Knossos), the fires made "fired-clay tablets" of a portion of the tablets found. Impressions of the basket weaving have been left in the clay. A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ...


Decipherment

The first clay tablet at Knossos was discovered by the British archaeologist Arthur Evans on March 31, 1900 and on April 6 he discovered a significant hoard of tablets (measuring 5x10 inches). Small tablets made out of clay were used from late 4th millennium BC onwards as a writing medium in Sumerian, Mesopotamian, Hittite, and Minoan/Mycenaean civilizations. ... A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Sir Arthur John Evans (July 8, 1851 – July 11, 1941) was an English archaeologist. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ...


The convention for numbering the symbols still in use today was first devised by US Professor Emmett Bennett, who, by 1950, had deciphered the metrical system. He was also an early proponent of the idea that Linear A and B represented different languages. United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Michael Ventris and John Chadwick performed the bulk of their decipherment of Linear B between 1951 and 1953. At first, Ventris chose his own numbering system, and agreed with Evans' hypothesis that Linear B was not Greek, however later switched back to Bennett's system, and ultimately reached the conclusion that Linear B was indeed an early form of Greek. [[1]] Michael George Francis Ventris (July 12, 1922–September 6, 1956) was an English architect and classical scholar, who along with John Chadwick was responsible for the decipherment of Linear B. Michael Ventris was educated in Switzerland and at Stowe School, housed in a magnificent 18th century country house. ... John Chadwick (21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar most famous for his role in deciphering Linear B, along with Michael Ventris. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Before their work, Alice Kober had studied Linear B and had managed to construct grids, linking symbols that seemed to have a strong grammatical relationship. Kober had noticed that a number of Linear B words had common roots and suffixes. This led her to believe that Linear B represented an inflected language, with nouns changing their endings depending on their case. However, some characters in the middle of the words seemed to correspond with neither a root nor a suffix. Because this effect was found in other, known languages, Kober surmised that the odd characters were bridging syllables, with the beginning of the syllable belonging to the root and the end belonging to the suffix. This was a reasonable assumption, since Linear B had far too many characters to be considered alphabetic and far too few characters to be logographic; therefore, each character should represent a syllable. Alice Kober (1906 – 1950) was an American classical scholar and archaeologist best known for laying the groundwork for the decipherment of Linear B. Starting in the early 1940s, Kober conducted her studies of Linear B while being an assistant to John Myers. ... A logogram, or logograph, is a single grapheme which represents a word or a morpheme (a meaningful unit of language). ...


Using the knowledge that certain characters shared the same beginning or ending sounds, Kober built a table similar to the one above; her untimely death at age 43 in 1950 prevented her from possibly taking the final step or see others do it, namely to link the characters to actual phonetics.


Based on her work, and after making some inspired assumptions, Ventris was able to figure out the pronunciation of the syllables. The deciphering of Linear B proved that it was a written form of Greek, to the amazement of Ventris himself, but also in direct contradiction to the general scientific views of the times. Chadwick, an expert in historical Greek, helped Ventris decipher the text and rebuild the vocabulary and grammar of ancient Cretan Greek.


Ventris' discovery was of immense significance, because he actually showed that a Greek-speaking Minoan-Mycenaean culture existed on Crete. The large majority of Linear B tablets were inventories and bureaucratic documents, with large tables of numbers and sums. This helped historians analyze the structure of ancient Minoan civilization.


Unicode

Linear B is assigned Unicode range 10000–1007F for syllabograms and 10080–100FF for ideograms. Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ...

Linear B Syllabary / Ideograms
Unicode.org chart Syllabary / Ideograms (PDF)
U+ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
10000 𐀀 𐀁 𐀂 𐀃 𐀄 𐀅 𐀆 𐀇 𐀈 𐀉 𐀊 𐀋 𐀌 𐀍 𐀎 𐀏
10010 𐀐 𐀑 𐀒 𐀓 𐀔 𐀕 𐀖 𐀗 𐀘 𐀙 𐀚 𐀛 𐀜 𐀝 𐀞 𐀟
10020 𐀠 𐀡 𐀢 𐀣 𐀤 𐀥 𐀦 𐀧 𐀨 𐀩 𐀪 𐀫 𐀬 𐀭 𐀮 𐀯
10030 𐀰 𐀱 𐀲 𐀳 𐀴 𐀵 𐀶 𐀷 𐀸 𐀹 𐀺 𐀻 𐀼 𐀽 𐀾 𐀿
10040 𐁀 𐁁 𐁂 𐁃 𐁄 𐁅 𐁆 𐁇 𐁈 𐁉 𐁊 𐁋 𐁌 𐁍 𐁎 𐁏
10050 𐁐 𐁑 𐁒 𐁓 𐁔 𐁕 𐁖 𐁗 𐁘 𐁙 𐁚 𐁛 𐁜 𐁝 𐁞 𐁟
10060 𐁠 𐁡 𐁢 𐁣 𐁤 𐁥 𐁦 𐁧 𐁨 𐁩 𐁪 𐁫 𐁬 𐁭 𐁮 𐁯
10070 𐁰 𐁱 𐁲 𐁳 𐁴 𐁵 𐁶 𐁷 𐁸 𐁹 𐁺 𐁻 𐁼 𐁽 𐁾 𐁿
10080 𐂀 𐂁 𐂂 𐂃 𐂄 𐂅 𐂆 𐂇 𐂈 𐂉 𐂊 𐂋 𐂌 𐂍 𐂎 𐂏
10090 𐂐 𐂑 𐂒 𐂓 𐂔 𐂕 𐂖 𐂗 𐂘 𐂙 𐂚 𐂛 𐂜 𐂝 𐂞 𐂟
100A0 𐂠 𐂡 𐂢 𐂣 𐂤 𐂥 𐂦 𐂧 𐂨 𐂩 𐂪 𐂫 𐂬 𐂭 𐂮 𐂯
100B0 𐂰 𐂱 𐂲 𐂳 𐂴 𐂵 𐂶 𐂷 𐂸 𐂹 𐂺 𐂻 𐂼 𐂽 𐂾 𐂿
100C0 𐃀 𐃁 𐃂 𐃃 𐃄 𐃅 𐃆 𐃇 𐃈 𐃉 𐃊 𐃋 𐃌 𐃍 𐃎 𐃏
100D0 𐃐 𐃑 𐃒 𐃓 𐃔 𐃕 𐃖 𐃗 𐃘 𐃙 𐃚 𐃛 𐃜 𐃝 𐃞 𐃟
100E0 𐃠 𐃡 𐃢 𐃣 𐃤 𐃥 𐃦 𐃧 𐃨 𐃩 𐃪 𐃫 𐃬 𐃭 𐃮 𐃯
100F0 𐃰 𐃱 𐃲 𐃳 𐃴 𐃵 𐃶 𐃷 𐃸 𐃹 𐃺 𐃻 𐃼 𐃽 𐃾 𐃿

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Linear B

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and the Aegean. ... Linear A incised on tablets found in Akrotiri, Santorini. ... The Cypro-Minoan syllabary, also known as CM I or Linear C is the Late Bronze Age syllabary used on Minoan Cyprus (in use roughly from the 15th to the 12th centuries BC). ...

Further reading

  • Chadwick, John (1958). The Decipherment of Linear B. Second edition (1990). Cambridge UP. ISBN 0-521-39830-4. 
  • Chadwick, John (1987). Linear B and Related Scripts; "Reading the Past". Third impression (1997). University of California Press/British Museum. ISBN 0-520-06019-9.  has the Enkomi clay tablet, circa 1500 BCE., examples of Linear B tablets, and translated, the basic Linear B syllabary, the Cypriot syllabary and discussions thereof, and short sections on Linear A, and the Phaistos Disk.
  • Chadwick, John (1976). The Mycenaean World. Cambridge UP. ISBN 0-521-29037-6. 
  • Levin, Saul (1964). The Linear B Decipherment Controversy Re-examined. State University of New York Press. OCLC 288842. 
  • Robinson, Andrew (1995). The Story of Writing. Paperback edition (1999). Thames and Hudson. ISBN 0-500-28156-4.  Chapter 6, Linear B, pp 108-119: discusses Arthur Evans, his work, the Cypriot clues, the syllabary, Alice Kober, the "Grid", and a sample tablet transliterated, and translated into English.
  • Ventris, Michael and Chadwick, John (1956). Documents in Mycenaean Greek. Second edition (1974). Cambridge UP. ISBN 0-521-08558-6. 
  • Singh, Simon (2000). The Code Book. Anchor. ISBN 0-385-49532-3.  for a general outline of the Linear B deciphering story, from Schliemman to Chadwick.
  • Ventris, Michael (1988). Work notes on Minoan language research and other unedited papers. Edizioni dell'Ateneo 1988 Roma. 

John Chadwick (21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar most famous for his role in deciphering Linear B, along with Michael Ventris. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... John Chadwick (21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar most famous for his role in deciphering Linear B, along with Michael Ventris. ... University of California Press, also known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California that engages in academic publishing. ... The British Museum in London is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... Enkomi/Tuzla (, , in north-western Cyprus), a village near Gazimagusa, is the cite of an important Bronze Age city, possibly the capital of Alasiya. ... Linear A incised on tablets found in Akrotiri, Santorini. ... The Phaistos Disc (Phaestos Disc, Festos Disc) is a curious archeological find, most likely dating from about 1700 BC. Its purpose and meaning, and even its original geographical place of manufacture, remain unknown, making it one of the most famous mysteries of archaeology. ... John Chadwick (21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar most famous for his role in deciphering Linear B, along with Michael Ventris. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... The State University of New York Press (or SUNY Press), founded in 1966, is a university press that is part of State University of New York system. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... Andrew Robinson. ... Thames & Hudson (also Thames and Hudson and sometimes T&H for brevity) are a publisher, especially of art and illustrated books, founded in 1949 by Walter and Eva Neurath. ... [[1]] Michael George Francis Ventris (July 12, 1922–September 6, 1956) was an English architect and classical scholar, who along with John Chadwick was responsible for the decipherment of Linear B. Michael Ventris was educated in Switzerland and at Stowe School, housed in a magnificent 18th century country house. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Simon Singh Simon Lehna Singh (born 1964) is a British author with a doctorate in physics, who has specialized in writing about mathematical and scientific topics in an accessible manner. ... [[1]] Michael George Francis Ventris (July 12, 1922–September 6, 1956) was an English architect and classical scholar, who along with John Chadwick was responsible for the decipherment of Linear B. Michael Ventris was educated in Switzerland and at Stowe School, housed in a magnificent 18th century country house. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Linear B - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1033 words)
Linear B is a script that was used for writing Mycenaean, an early form of Greek.
Linear B occurs primarily on tablets dated from the 14th and 13th centuries BCE.
The deciphering of Linear B proved that it was a written form of Greek, to the amazement of Ventris himself, but also in direct contradiction to the general scientific views of the times.
Greek - Keyboard Map for Linear B Font (568 words)
Linear B was deciphered by Michael Ventris in 1952, and shown to be used for writing a very early form of Greek.
Linear B evidently represents a borrowing from the Minoan civilization of Crete, which was written in a syllabary called Linear A. The Minoan language is unknown and the Linear A inscriptions untranslated, although there is enough similarity between Linear A and Linear B that some of the syllabic values can be inferred.
Linear B does not appear until after the collapse of Minoan civilization following the catastrophic eruption of the volcanic island Thera, and it was used primarily for lists of goods.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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