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Encyclopedia > Line Printer Daemon protocol

The Line Printer Daemon protocol/Line Printer Remote protocol (or LPD, LPR) also known as the Berkeley printing system, is a set of programs that provide printer spooling and network print server functionality for Unix-like systems. The most common implementations of LPD are the official BSD UNIX operating system and the LPRng project. The Common Unix Printing System (or CUPS), which is more common on modern Linux distributions, borrows heavily from LPD. In computer science, spooling is an acronym for simultaneous peripheral operations on-line (although this is thought by some to be a backronym). ... A print serveris a host computer or device to which one or more printers are connected and which accepts print jobs from external client computers. ... A Unix-like operating system is one that behaves in a manner similar to a Unix system, while not necessarily conforming to or being certified to any version of the Single UNIX Specification. ... BSD redirects here; for other uses see BSD (disambiguation). ... The application LPRng is an implementation of the Line Printer Daemon protocol (commonly known as the Berkeley printing system or LPR/LPD) that provides printer spooling and network print server functionality. ... The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) is a modularised computer printing system for Unix-like operating systems that allows a computer to act as a powerful print server. ... Tux the penguin, based on an image created by Larry Ewing in 1996, is the logo and mascot of Linux. ...

Contents


Commands

The official LPD protocol defines the following commands:

  • lpr—Assign a job to a queue.
  • lpq—Display the jobs assigned to a queue and their print status.
  • lprm—Remove a job from a queue.
  • lpc—Control a queue.

The lpd program provides the daemon and queues with which the aforementioned commands interface. In Unix and other computer operating systems, a daemon is a particular class of computer program that runs in the background, rather than under the direct control of a user; they are usually instantiated as processes. ...


Usage

In order that a system provide print functionality using LPD, the lpd program must be configured and started. Based upon its configuration, it will create the necessary queues and address the printers available to users of the system. Once started, it listens for local messages from the lpr, lpq, lprm, and lpc programs, as well as for network messages from remote clients who also implement the LPD protocol.


A printer that supports LPD/LPR is sometimes referred to as a "TCP/IP printer" (TCP/IP is used to establish connections between printers and workstations on a network), although that term seems equally applicable to a printer that supports CUPS. The internet protocol suite is the set of communications protocols that implement the protocol stack on which the Internet and most commercial networks run. ...


References

  • RFC 1179

See also

The application LPRng is an implementation of the Line Printer Daemon protocol (commonly known as the Berkeley printing system or LPR/LPD) that provides printer spooling and network print server functionality. ... The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) is a modularised computer printing system for Unix-like operating systems that allows a computer to act as a powerful print server. ... In computer science, spooling is an acronym for simultaneous peripheral operations on-line (although this is thought by some to be a backronym). ... A print serveris a host computer or device to which one or more printers are connected and which accepts print jobs from external client computers. ... The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) is a modularised computer printing system for Unix-like operating systems that allows computers to act as powerful print servers. ...

External links

  • PCMag encyclopedia definition of "TCP/IP printer"
  • LPD/LPR Protocol
  • Network Printing

  Results from FactBites:
 
Line printer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1115 words)
The line printer is a form of high speed impact printer in which a line of type is printed at a time.
In a typical drum printer design, a fixed font character set is engraved onto the periphery of a number of print wheels, the number matching the number of columns (letters in a line) the printer could print.
As with the drum printer, as the correct character passed by each column, a hammer was fired from behind the paper.
Text of RFC1179 Standard for Windows TCP/IP Printing (3296 words)
The Line Printer Daemon and its components in RFC1179 are known as Berkeley Style Daemons (BSD).
Daemon commands The verbs in the command names should be interpreted as statements made to the daemon.
Control file lines This section discusses the format of the lines in the control file which is sent to the line printer daemon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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