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Encyclopedia > Linda Ronstadt
Linda Ronstadt
Also known as Queen of Rock
Queen of Country Rock
First Lady of Rock
Born July 15, 1946 (1946-07-15) (age 61)Tucson, Arizona, United States
Genre(s) Rock, rock and roll, new wave, folk, Country, ranchera, Latin American, rhythm & blues, opera, cajun, big Band, jazz, children's music, pop, adult contemporary, art rock, acoustic rock, arena rock
Occupation(s) Singer-Songwriter, Musician, Record producer, Actress
Instrument(s) Vocals
Years active 1967 - present
Label(s) Capitol, Elektra, Asylum, Verve Records, Vanguard
Associated
acts
Stone Poneys (1966-68)
Swampwater (1969-1970)
The Eagles (1972-1975, 1999)
Nelson Riddle (1982-86)
Trio (with Dolly Parton,Emmylou Harris) (1987 & 1999)
Aaron Neville (1989)
Emmylou Harris (2000)
The Zozo Sisters (with Ann Savoy) (2002 & 2006)

Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. A singer-songwriter and record producer, she is better known as a definitive interpreter of songs.[1] She has recorded over 30 studio albums, and has made guest appearances on over 100 other albums.[2] is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... New Wave was a pop and rock music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... Folk song redirects here. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... The ranchera is a genre of the traditional music of Mexico. ... Latin American music, or the music of Latin America, is sometimes called Latin music. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Catholics of Canada. ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s, although there are many big-bands around nowadays. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ... Vanguard Records was a record label set up in 1950 by brothers Maynard and Seymour Solomon in New York. ... The Stone Poneys were a Los Angeles folk-rock trio consisting of Bob Kimmel (rhythm guitar), Ken Edwards (lead guitar), and Linda Ronstadt (vocals). ... Swampwater is a pioneering American country rock band that formed and started out initially as Linda Ronstadt’s backing group in the late 60’s soon after she went solo. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American, Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... An entertainer is someone who is hired to entertain people. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... An Emmy Award. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ...

Contents

Career Overview

Establishing her professional career in the mid sixties at the forefront of California's emerging folk rock and country rock movements, genres which later defined post-sixties rock music, Ronstadt became the lead singer of the successful folk rock group, The Stone Poneys. Later as a solo artist, she released Hand Sown ... Home Grown in 1969, considered the first alternative country record by a female recording artist.[3] During her years struggling as a solo recording artist, Ronstadt actively toured, while making television show appearances. However, in the mid 1970s Ronstadt attained unprecedented hit-making success with chart-topping albums such as Heart Like A Wheel, Simple Dreams, and Living In The USA. Coupled with her chart success, Ronstadt became the first female "arena class" rock star, setting records as one of the top-grossing concert artist for the decade,[4][5] and the most successful female rock singer of her era.[6][7][8]Labeled the First Lady of Rock,[9] and The Queen of Rock, Ronstadt was the Top-Selling Female Artist of the 1970's.[10] Her rock n roll image was equally as famous as her music, landing six times on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, Newsweek, and on the coveted cover of Time magazine. In the early 1980's Ronstadt went to Broadway, teamed with composer Phillip Glass, recorded Traditional music, and collaborated with famed conductor Nelson Riddle, which at the time and era, was viewed as an original and unorthodox turn by a rock n roll artist. This gamble paid-off,[11] and Ronstadt remained one of the best-selling vocalists throughout the 1980s with multi-platinum selling albums such as: What's New, Canciones de Mi Padre and Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind. Ronstadt, has continued to successfully tour, collaborate, and record albums such as: Winter Light, Hummin' to Myself and Adieu False Heart. Linda Ronstadt's thirty-plus album catalog continue to be best sellers, with a majority of them certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum.[12] Ronstadt has record sales in excess of 80 million worldwide, including over 45 million albums sold in the US alone.[13] [14][15] A consummate American artist, Ronstadt opened many doors for women in rock n roll and in music by achieving unprecedented success and being at the vanguard of many musical movements.[16] Ronstadt is one of the top female vocalists in U.S. history and part of the list of best-selling music artists. The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... The Stone Poneys were a Los Angeles, California folk-rock trio consisting of Bob Kimmel (rhythm guitar), Ken Edwards (lead guitar), and Linda Ronstadt (vocals). ... Hand Sown . ... Matt Hillyer of Texas-based Eleven Hundred Springs Alternative country is a term applied to various subgenres of country music. ... Heart Like A Wheel is a 1974 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Simple Dreams was the most successful of Linda Ronstadts studio albums, spending five weeks at number one on the Billboard album charts and finally debunking Fleetwood Macs Rumours from the top spot in 1977, not to mention the competition from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. ... Living in the USA is a 1978 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Philip Glass looks upon sheet music in a portrait taken by Annie Leibovitz. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Whats New is a 1983 Linda Ronstadt album consisting of nine songs of Traditional Pop music. ... Canciones de Mi Padre (Spanish for Songs of My Father, or My Fathers Songs) was Linda Ronstadts first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. ... Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind is a 1989 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring soul singer Aaron Neville. ... Winter Light is a 1993 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt. ... Hummin’ to Myself is a 2004 Linda Ronstadt album. ... Adieu False Heart is a 2006 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring Cajun music singer Ann Savoy. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... € The worlds best-selling music artists cannot be listed officially, as there is no organization that has recorded global music sales in the manner that the RIAA does in the United States. ...


Private Life

Early life

Linda Ronstadt was born in Tucson, Arizona in 1946 to Gilbert Ronstadt (1911-1995), a prosperous machinery merchant who ran the F. Ronstadt Co.,[17] and Ruth Mary Copeman Ronstadt (1914-1982), a homemaker with a gift for science. She was raised along with her brothers Peter (served as Tucson's chief of police from 1981-1992) and Michael and her sister Gretchen (Suzy), on the family's 10-acre ranch. The family was featured in Family Circle Magazine in 1953.[18] Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ... Chief of Police is the title typically given to the head of a police department, particularly in the United States and Canada. ... Family Circle is an American womens magazine published 15 times a year by Meredith Corporation. ...


Her father, Gilbert, came from a leading and pioneering Arizona ranching family,[19] was Mexican-American, with some German and English ancestry, with his grandfather, Frederick Augustus Ronstadt immigrating to the West in the 1840s from Hanover, Germany, marrying a Mexican-citizen, having several children, including Federico José María Ronstadt (Linda's grandfather) and eventually settling in Tucson.[20][21] A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Mexican Americans are citizens of the United States of Mexican ancestry. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Alternate meanings: Hanover (district), Hanover (region), Hanover (state), other uses Map of Germany showing Hanover Hanover (in German: Hannover [haˈnoːfɐ]), on the Leine river, is the capital of the state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen) in Germany. ...


The Ronstadt Family has made important contributions to arts and culture in the American Southwest.[22] In fact, so great are their contributions to the state of Arizona that their history and influence, including wagon making, commerce, pharmacies and, of course, music, is chronicled within the library of the University of Arizona, her alma mater.[23] The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ...


Her mother, Ruth Mary, was the daughter of the prolific American inventor Lloyd Groff Copeman, raised in Michigan, was of Anglo-American descent, with German, English and Dutch heritage. Lloyd, with nearly seven hundred patents in his name, invented an early form of the toaster, the grease gun, the first electric stove and an early form of the microwave oven. His most commercially successful invention was rubber ice cube trays.[24] Lloyd Groff Copeman (29 December 1881-5 July 1956)[1] was a prolific and successful American inventor who was responsible for devising the first electric stove, an early form of the microwave oven and the flexible rubber ice cube tray, among other products. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a government to an inventor or applicant for a limited amount of time (normally maximum 20 years from the filing date, depending on extension). ... For the English town, see Towcester. ... A stove is a heat-producing device. ... Microwave oven A microwave oven, or microwave, is a kitchen appliance employing microwave radiation primarily to cook or heat food. ...


Linda Ronstadt's early life was filled with music and tradition, which influenced her musical choices.[25]. A product of the great American radio of the 1950's and 1960's with its eclectic broadcasting.[26] Growing up she listened to all types of music, and credits her mother for her music appreciation of Gilbert and Sullivan and the Traditional Pop music that she herself would in turn help reintroduce to an entire generation. [27] [28] Staying true any musical tradition Ronstadt sticks to “what... the music demand(s)”.[29] For other uses, see Radio (disambiguation). ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ...


Personal life

In the 1970s her private life became very public, most notably, as publicity surrounding her life was propelled in the late 1970s by a relationship with then-Governor Jerry Brown of California, a Democratic presidential candidate. They shared a Newsweek magazine cover in April 1979.[30] Ronstadt and Brown also took a trip to Africa which became fodder for paparazzi and the press. For the whistleblower, see Gerald W. Brown. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States (often abbreviated to POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Paparazzi (disambiguation). ...


In the mid 1980s, Ronstadt was engaged ("ring on the finger and all") to Star Wars director George Lucas.[31] This article is about the series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ...


Ronstadt is a major supporter and admirer of Salina, Kansas' sustainable agriculture pioneer Wes Jackson, saying in 2000 "the work he's doing right now is the most important work there is in the (United States)," [32] and dedicating the rock anthem Desperado to him at a August, 2007 Kansas City, Kansas concert of hers. [33] Salina is a city in and the county seat of Saline County, Kansas, United States. ... Wes Jackson is the founder and current president of the Land Institute. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... An anthem is a composition to an English religious text sung in the context of an Anglican service. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ...


She has two adopted children, Mary and Carlos. Her daughter has made her a fan of musician Pink. Her son, who is into Death Metal, has introduced her to the music of Rob Zombie and she states "There's real power and energy (to his music)" [34]and on AC/DC she says "I really love Back in Black. I appreciate it musically (and) how good the rhythm guitar player is." Alecia Beth Moore (IPA pronunciation: [1]) (born on September 8, 1979), known professionally as Pink (often stylized as ), is an American singer-songwriter who gained prominence in 2000. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... From left to right: Singer Brian Johnson, Rhythm Guitarist Malcolm Young, Bass Guitarist Cliff Williams, Lead Guitarist Angus Young, Drummer Phil Rudd. ... Singles from Back in Black Released: 1980 Released: 1981 Released: 1981 For other uses, see Back in Black (disambiguation). ...


Ronstadt is a big fan of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels, and even persuaded friend and noted New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani to start reading the Harry Potter novels[35]. Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is an British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... New York Times critic Michiko Kakutani. ...


Ronstadt's favorite female vocalist is Maria Callas, saying "There's no one in her league. That's it. Period.",[36] "I learn more...about singing rock n ­roll from listening to Maria Callas records than I ever would from listening to pop music for a month of Sundays." "She's the greatest chick singer ever."[37] She admires Callas for her musicianship and her attempts in the 20th century in pushing singing, particularly opera, back into the Bel Canto "natural style of singing."[38]. Maria Callas in a casual moment, 1960s Maria Callas (Greek: Μαρία Κάλλας) (December 2, 1923 – September 16, 1977) was an American born, Greek dramatic coloratura soprano and perhaps the best-known opera singer of the post-World War II period. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The term Bel Canto may refer to: Belcanto, a vocal technique; or Bel Canto, a novel by Ann Patchett. ...


Ronstadt defines her voice type as that of a Coloratura soprano. This article is about the voice-type. ...


As of 2007, Ronstadt resides in the San Francisco area while also maintaining her home in Tucson, Arizona.[39] However, this same year, Ronstadt drew criticism and praise [40] from some of her local Tucsonians by observing that the local city council's failings, developers' strip mall mentality, greed and growing dust problem has rendered the city unrecognizable and poorly developed.[41] San Francisco redirects here. ... Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ... Example of a small strip mall. A strip mall (also called a plaza) is a shopping center where the stores are arranged in a row, with a sidewalk in front. ... For other uses, see Greed (disambiguation). ... Look up dust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In an August 14, 2007, interview she commented on all her well publicized outspoken views, in particular her, Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts incident (see Political Controversy below), by noting, "If I had it to do over I would be much more gracious to everyone...you can be as outspoken as you want if you are very, very respectful. Show some grace."[42] is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Theatre for the Performing Arts is a 7,000 seat theater located in the Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip. ...


On September 23, 2007, Linda Ronstadt, was inducted into the The Arizona Music & Entertainment Hall of Fame, also included among the strong class of inductees were Stevie Nicks, Buck Owens and filmmaker Steven Spielberg.[43] is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Stephanie Lynn Stevie Nicks (born May 26, 1948) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work with Fleetwood Mac and a long solo career, which collectively have produced over twenty Top 350 hits. ... Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...


Political Controversy

Controversy surrounding Ronstadt arose during a July 17, 2004 performance at the Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts in Las Vegas. Towards the end of her performance, as she had done in performances across the country, Ronstadt spoke to the audience, praising Michael Moore's documentary film Fahrenheit 9/11, a movie discussing the Iraq War, and dedicated the song "Desperado" to Michael Moore. Accounts of the crowd's initial reaction was mixed, with "half the crowd heartily applauding her praise for Moore,(and) the other half booing."[44] However, the situation escalated into what Tyri Squyres, director of public relations at the Aladdin, described as a "mob scene...It's amazing how ugly it got," with people walking out, tearing down posters, throwing drinks and demanding a refund. is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Theatre for the Performing Arts is a 7,000 seat theater located in the Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip. ... For other uses, see Las Vegas (disambiguation) and Vegas (disambiguation). ... Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is a controversial, award-winning documentary film by American left-wing filmmaker Michael Moore which presents a critical look at the presidency of George W. Bush, the War on Terrorism, and its coverage in the American news media. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Following the concert, news accounts reported that Ronstadt was "evicted" from the hotel premises.[45] Ronstadt claimed she wasn't physically taken off stage but was ordered by Aladdin staff to wait to speak with Aladdin President Bill Timmins. She claims to have refused to wait and to have left, and later remarked that while Aladdin staff attempted to detain her, she thought, "Are they were going to make me start writing on a chalkboard or read me my Miranda rights?" Later she said, "Apparently..(the Aladdin)..called up one of the people that was traveling with us and went, 'She's talking about Michael Moore, and this is a place for entertainment, not politics'."


Ronstadt's comments, as well as some audience members and the hotel reactions, became a topic of discussion nationwide, as Timmons and Michael Moore all made public statements on the controversy. [46]


The "Aladdin Incident" subsequently drew international headlines and public discourse on an entertainer's right to express a political opinion from the stage. The Aladdin Incident made the editorial section of the New York Times.[47] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Following the incident, many friends of Linda Ronstadt, including The Eagles, immediately cancelled their engagement at the Aladdin.[48]. Likewise, Ronstadt received immediate telegrams of support from her rock 'n roll friends around the world, such as The Rolling Stones, The Eagles, and Elton John. The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ...


Despite reports of this public response, Ronstadt continued in her praise of Moore and his film throughout her 2004 summer concerts across the country, which evidently continued to have a polarizing effect on the public. As Peter Asher noted, "Ronstadt is an extremely determined woman, in every area."[49] Peter Asher (born on June 22, 1944 in Willesden, Middlesex, England) is a guitarist, singer and record producer. ...


Career biography

At age fourteen, she formed a folk trio with her brother Peter and her sister Suzy. They called themselves The New Union Ramblers, and the trio played around coffeehouses, fraternity houses, and small joints. Their repertoire included the music they grew up on - folk, country, bluegrass, and Mexican.[50] But increasingly, Linda wanted to make a union of folk music and rock 'n' roll,[51] and in 1964, at 17, she decided to move on to Los Angeles. Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


The Stone Poneys

The cover of the Stone Poneys' 1967 LP, Evergreen, Volume 2.
The cover of the Stone Poneys' 1967 LP, Evergreen, Volume 2.

While Ronstadt was a student at Arizona State University, she met guitarist Bob Kimmel. Together they moved to Los Angeles. In 1964, guitarist-songwriter Kenny Edwards joined the pair, co-writing several folk-rock songs with Kimmel. They recorded "So Fine" for Curb Records. The record company wanted them to sing surf music, which the trio chose not to do. The trio was discovered and signed with Nick Venet and Capitol Records, with Ronstadt as the lead singer. They became a leading attraction on California's folk circuit,[52] recording their first album in the fall of 1966. The Stone Poneys acted as a supporting act for The Doors on tour; "The Lizard King" didn't exactly endear himself to Ronstadt, she remarked... "We thought they were a good band, but we didn't like the singer",[53] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Stone Poneys were a Los Angeles folk-rock trio consisting of Bob Kimmel (rhythm guitar), Ken Edwards (lead guitar), and Linda Ronstadt (vocals). ... Curb Records is a country record label started by Mike Curb in 1973, after leaving MGM Records. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Nick Venet was a record producer who worked for Capitol Records. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... This page is about the rock band. ... The Lizard King is a mythic figure created as an alter ego by Jim Morrison, lead singer of the popular psychedelic rock group The Doors. ...


That same year, a second album followed, Evergreen, Volume 2, released in June. The album cover is notable for showing all three Stone Poney members on the cover. Evergreen was significant for the group's hit single "Different Drum", which reached 13 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was written by future Monkees member Michael Nesmith, along with notable songs, "Back on the Street Again" (Steve Gillette) and "One for One" (Al Silverman and Austin DeLone). Boss Drum was The Shamens 1992 album which featured their controversial hit Ebeneezer Goode. Track listing Boss Drum L.S.I.: Love Sex Intelligence Space Time Librae Solidi Denari Ebeneezer Goode Comin On Phorever People Fatman Scientas Re:Evolution (featuring Terence McKenna) Boss Dub Phorever Dub Categories: | | ... The Monkees in 1968 (left to right): Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork, Mike Nesmith and Davy Jones The Monkees were a four-person band who appeared in an American television series of the same name, which ran on NBC from 1966 to 1968. ... Robert Michael Nesmith, born December 30, 1942 ) in Harris County, Texas,[1] is an American musician, songwriter, actor, producer, novelist, businessman, and philanthropist, perhaps best known for his time in the musical group The Monkees and on the TV series of the same name. ...


The beginning of the end for the Stone Poneys occurred when their then-manager came up to them at The Troubadour one night and said, Well, I can get your chick singer recorded, but I don't know about the rest of the group. And that was the end of it. Capitol Records released The Stone Poneys in January 1967; it failed to chart. Exterior of the Troubadour The Troubadour is a nightclub located in West Hollywood, California, USA, at 9081 Santa Monica Boulevard just east of Doheny Drive and the border of Beverly Hills. ... The Stone Poneys were a Los Angeles, California folk-rock trio consisting of Bob Kimmel (rhythm guitar), Ken Edwards (lead guitar), and Linda Ronstadt (vocals). ...


A third album, The Stone Poneys & Friends, Volume 3, was released in April 1968 and included the single "Up To My Neck In High Muddy Water," which stalled at No. 93; however, at this stage, the group had disbanded, and Linda Ronstadt went solo.


Solo career

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1970, on the backside cover of the album Silk Purse.
Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1970, on the backside cover of the album Silk Purse.

Still contractually obligated to Capitol Records, Ronstadt released her first solo album, Hand Sown ... Home Grown in 1969, considered the first alternative country record by a female recording artist.[54] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Silk Purse (1970) is the second solo album by Linda Ronstadt, released in March 1970, a year after the release of her first solo set, Hand Sown . ... Hand Sown . ... Matt Hillyer of Texas-based Eleven Hundred Springs Alternative country is a term applied to various subgenres of country music. ...


Ronstadt also vocalized in some commercials. One notable one is the famous late 1960s commercial for Remington electric razors, with a multi-tracked Ronstadt and Frank Zappa saying that the electric razor "cleans you, thrills you ... may even keep you from getting busted".[55] Remington Products is a worldwide producer of razors (shavers), epilators and haircare products for men and women. ... Occams Razor or Hanlons razor A razor is a an edge tool (primarily, used in shaving). ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ...


Ronstadt released her second solo album titled Silk Purse in March 1970. It was the only one of Ronstadt's studio discs that was recorded entirely in Nashville. Ronstadt hired Elliot Mazer to produce the album. Mazer had been recommended to Ronstadt by her friend Janis Joplin, who had worked with him on her Cheap Thrills album. [56] The Silk Purse album cover was the first to establish a trend in many other Ronstadt album covers - bold, colorful and memorable. This album cover showed Ronstadt in a muddy pig pen with the back and inside cover showing Ronstadt in bold red and on stage. Ronstadt has stated that she wasn't pleased with this album although it provided her with her first solo hit, the multi-format single, "Long Long Time". Also Silk Purse is notable for earning Ronstadt a Grammy Award nomination for Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female, the first of her 27 Grammy nominations. Silk Purse (1970) is the second solo album by Linda Ronstadt, released in March 1970, a year after the release of her first solo set, Hand Sown . ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ...


Linda began incorporating new sounds into her stage gigs, with the help of various backing bands. However, Linda noted in a 1969 interview for Fusion Magazine, that it was difficult being a single chick singer with a decidedly all-male backup band.[57] According to her, it was really hard for a single girl to get a band of backing musicians, because there's all that ego problem of being labeled a sideman for a girl singer. For example, the guitar player would hurry to the microphone and say 'Thank You' before she could even get to the mic after their set. Or she'd find that musicians felt their masculinity was threatened being sidemen to a girl singer.[58] A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ...


Soon after she went solo in the late 1960s, one of her first backing bands was the pioneering country-rock band Swampwater, famous for incorporating cajun and swamp-rock elements into their music. Its members included cajun fiddler Gib Guilbeau, John Beland, before either of them would join The Flying Burrito Brothers,[59] Stan Pratt, Thad Maxwell and Eric White (Clarence White of The Byrds' brother). Swampwater would go on to back Ronstadt on TV's The Johnny Cash Show,[60] The Mike Douglas Show and The Big Sur Folk Festival.[61] Another backing band featured players Don Henley, Glenn Frey, Bernie Leadon and Randy Meisner who later formed The Eagles, who would go on to become the best-selling American group ever. They toured with her for a short period in 1972, and were her studio band for her third solo album, the self-titled Linda Ronstadt album. Swampwater is a pioneering American country rock band that formed and started out initially as Linda Ronstadt’s backing group in the late 60’s soon after she went solo. ... Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Catholics of Canada. ... The violin is a stringed musical instrument that has four strings tuned a fifth apart. ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers was an early country rock band, best known for its influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... Clarence White (born Clarence LeBlanc) (June 7, 1944 – July 14, 1973) was a guitar player for Nashville West, The Byrds, Muleskinner, and the Kentucky Colonels. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Johnny Cash, 1969 The Johnny Cash Show was an American television music show presented by Johnny Cash; the series ran from 1969-1971 on ABC. It featured many folk/country musicians of the time, such as Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Merle Haggard, James Taylor and Tammy Wynette. ... The Mike Douglas Show was an American daytime television talk show hosted by Mike Douglas that ran from 1961 to 1982. ... Donald Hugh Don Henley (born July 22, 1947 in Gilmer, Texas) is an American rock musician who is the drummer and one of the lead singers and songwriters of the band Eagles. ... Glenn Lewis Frey (born November 6, 1948 in Detroit, Michigan[1]) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and actor, best known as one of the founding members of rock band Eagles. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ... Randy Herman Meisner (born 8 March 1946 in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, U.S.) is a bass guitar player, singer and songwriter best known as a founding member of the country-rock group the Eagles. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ...


In 1973, Linda Ronstadt hired producer Peter Asher, then producer for James Taylor. Asher at first was hesitant because Linda Ronstadt had a reputation throughout the music biz of being a "woman of strong opinions and knew what she wanted to do (with her career)" and Asher did not like being pushed around, likewise, in this time and era these opinionated qualities in a woman where considered a "negative, whereas in a man they were perceived as being masterful and bold" but Asher, of course, ended up agreeing to manage Linda Ronstadt.[62] This relationship with Asher, as producer of her albums, continued through the late 1980s. Asher, who has gone on to produce numerous other artist and winning two Grammy Awards for Producer of the Year, recently remarked that Linda Ronstadt remains his "favorite female singer of all time. Her voice is just astounding and ...(with) very clear ideas herself about what she (wants) to do, but also she could just sing the s--- out of anything."[63] Peter Asher (born on June 22, 1944 in Willesden, Middlesex, England) is a guitarist, singer and record producer. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... The Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical has been awarded since 1975. ...


She also released her fourth solo album in 1973, Don't Cry Now, and the first of her studio releases for Asylum Records. The album followed the theme of Ronstadt album covers, again, bold, colorful and memorable. It featured her first 'Country' hit with "Silver Threads And Golden Needles," which she had first recorded on her 1969 Hand Sewn...Home Grown album, which this time hit the Top 20. Dont Cry Now (1973) is Linda Ronstadts fourth solo LP and the first of her studio releases for Asylum Records, following a relationship with Capitol that resulted in three albums with her former band, the Stone Poneys, and three subsequent solo releases. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ...


In 1973, Ronstadt began touring as the opening act for Neil Young's Time Fades Away tour. This tour was notable for the fact that she was introduced to Emmylou Harris. Backstage at a concert in Texas, Chris Hillman put the newcomer Harris together with Linda Ronstadt, telling them, "You two could be good friends."[64] This article is about the musician. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ...


In the 1974 book Rock'n'Roll Woman, author Katherine Orloff interviewed Ronstadt stating, "her own musical preferences run strongly to rhythm and blues, the type of music she most frequently chooses to listen to.....(and) her goal is to ....be soulful too. With this in mind, Linda fuses country and rock into a special union."[65]


By this stage of her career Ronstadt had established her niche in the field of Country-rock. She, along with other notable musicians such as The Flying Burrito Brothers, Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons, Swampwater, Neil Young, and The Eagles, helped free country music from stereotypes and showed rockers that country was OK, however, she stated that she was being pushed hard, into singing more rock n roll."[66] Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers was an early country rock band, best known for its influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. ... Swampwater is a pioneering American country rock band that formed and started out initially as Linda Ronstadt’s backing group in the late 60’s soon after she went solo. ... This article is about the musician. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Top rock vocalist of the decade

By the end of the 1970's, the record industry gave Linda Ronstadt a Special Decade Award as the Top Selling Female album and singles artist of the decade.[67] Outside of the recording studio, Ronstadt became a very successful concert and touring artist, as author Gerri Hirshey explains in her book We Gotta Get Out of This Place: The True, Tough Story of Women in Rock, Linda Ronstadt became the first "arena-class rock diva", with "hugely anticipated tours."[68] Amazon.com, defines her as the American female rock superstar of the 1970's. [69] Dirty Linen magazine describes her as the "first true woman rock 'n' roll superstar.....(selling) out stadiums with a string of mega-successful albums."[70] Coupled with the fact that her album covers, posters, magazine covers - basically her entire rock n roll image conveyed - was just as famous as her music.[71] That by the end of the decade, Redbook defined her as, "the most successful female rock star in the world..(who) has survived in the mostly male world of rock",[72]. Amazon. ... Dirty Linen is a bi-monthly magazine of folk and world music based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... For other uses, see Red Book. ...

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1974, on the cover of the Grammy winning album and 2X platinum certified studio disc, Heart Like a Wheel.
Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1974, on the cover of the Grammy winning album and 2X platinum certified studio disc, Heart Like a Wheel.

Having been a cult favorite on the music scene for 11 years, 1975 was "remembered in the music biz as the year when 29 year old Linda Ronstadt belatedly happened."[73] With the November 1974 release of Heart Like A Wheel, her fifth solo album and last for Capitol Records, by February 1975, Ronstadt reached No. 1 on the Billboard Album chart and the album went double-platinum (over 2 million copies sold). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Heart Like A Wheel is a 1974 album by Linda Ronstadt. ...


The album was highly notable not only for showing a physically attractive Ronstadt on the cover but more importantly, its critical and commercial success was due to a fine presentation of country and rock and helped launch Ronstadt's career into the stratosphere, making Heart Like a Wheel her first of many major commercial successes that would put her on the path as one of the best-selling female artists of all time. Ronstadt won her first Grammy Award for Best Country Vocal Performance/Female for "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)" which had peaked at No. 2 Country. The album was nominated for Album of the Year (losing to Paul Simon's Still Crazy After All These Years). The album included the No. 1 Pop single, "You're No Good", followed by the No. 2 single, "When Will I Be Loved which also became Linda's first No. 1 Country hit. Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance was first awarded in 1965. ... The Grammy Award for Album of the Year is the most prestigious award category. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Still Crazy After All These Years is an album and a song by Paul Simon Song list Still Crazy After All These Years My Little Town I Do It For You Love 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover Night Game Gone at Last Some Folks Lives Roll Easy Have A... Youre No Good is the name of a song written by Clint Ballard, Jr. ...


Immediately, Rolling Stone magazine put her on its cover in March, 1975 for the first time. The cover was the first of six Rolling Stone magazine covers and photographed by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz. It also included her as featured artist with a full photo layout and an article by Ben Fong-Torres, discussing her many struggling years in rock n roll, home life and what it meant to be a women on tour in a decidedly all-male environment. This article is about the magazine. ... This article is about the American photographer. ... Ben Fong-Torres (方振豪; pinyin: Fāng Zhènháo; born January 7, 1945, in Alameda, California) is a rock journalist, author, and broadcaster best known for his association with Rolling Stone magazine (through 1981) and the San Francisco Chronicle (from around 1982). ...


Later this same year, 1975, her album Prisoner in Disguise was released. It climbed into the Top 5 on the Billboard album chart went platinum. It became her second in a row to go platinum, "a grand slam" in the same year (Ronstadt would eventually be the first female artist in popular music history to have three consecutive platinum albums and would go on to have eight consecutive platinum albums and then another seven between 1983 and 1990). [74] The disc's first single release was "Love Is A Rose". It was climbing the Pop and Country charts but Heat Wave, a rockified version of the 1963 hit by Martha and the Vandellas, was receiving considerable airplay. Asylum pulled the "Love Is A Rose" single and issued "Heat Wave" with "Love Is A Rose" on the B-side. "Heat Wave" hit the Top Five on Billboard's Hot 100 while "Love Is A Rose" hit the Top Five on Billboard's Country chart. Prisoner in Disguise (1975) is Linda Ronstadts sixth solo LP release and the second of hers for the label Asylum Records. ... (Love is Like a) Heat Wave is a 1963 soul single by Motown girl group Martha and the Vandellas on the Gordy (Motown) label. ... Martha and the Vandellas (known from 1967 to 1972 as Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were one of the most successful groups in the Motown roster during the 1960s and fully active from 1960 to 1972, performing at various times doo-wop, blues, pop, rock and roll and soul. ...

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1977, on the cover of the Grammy winning album design and 3X platinum certified studio disc, Simple Dreams.
Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1977, on the cover of the Grammy winning album design and 3X platinum certified studio disc, Simple Dreams.

In 1976 Linda reached the Billboard Top 3 and won her second career Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female for her third consecutive platinum album Hasten Down the Wind. The album showcased Ronstadt the singer-songwriter, composing two songs, "Try Me Again" and "Lo Siento, Mi Vida (I'm Sorry, My Love)". It also included interpretation of Willie Nelson's classic "Crazy", which became a Top 10 Country hit for Ronstadt in early 1977. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Simple Dreams was the most successful of Linda Ronstadts studio albums, spending five weeks at number one on the Billboard album charts and finally debunking Fleetwood Macs Rumours from the top spot in 1977, not to mention the competition from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. ... The Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance has been awarded since 1966. ... Hasten Down the Wind was Linda Ronstadts third major hit album, earning her a Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Female, in 1976. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ...


In late 1977 Ronstadt surpassed the success of Heart Like a Wheel with her album Simple Dreams, which held the No. 1 position for five consecutive weeks on the Billboard 200 The album was released in September and by April of the following year had sold over 3 million copies - triple-platinum - in the US alone. Interestingly, Simple Dreams had already been holding at No. 2 for two months behind Fleetwood Mac's long running No. 1 album Rumours before eventually claiming the top spot. Simple Dreams included the RIAA platinum-certified single "Blue Bayou" as well as "It's So Easy" and "Poor Poor Pitiful Me". In fact, Simple Dreams was the highest selling album by any solo artist in 1977. It also garnered several Grammy Award nominations - including Record Of The Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female for "Blue Bayou" (losing to Barbara Streisand's Evergreen) - and won its art director, Kosh a Grammy Award for Best Album Cover, the first of three Grammy Awards he would win for designing memorable Linda Ronstadt album covers. Simple Dreams was the most successful of Linda Ronstadts studio albums, spending five weeks at number one on the Billboard album charts and finally debunking Fleetwood Macs Rumours from the top spot in 1977, not to mention the competition from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... Simple Dreams was the most successful of Linda Ronstadts studio albums, spending five weeks at number one on the Billboard album charts and finally debunking Fleetwood Macs Rumours from the top spot in 1977, not to mention the competition from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. ... This article is about the band. ... Rumours is a rock and roll album released by Fleetwood Mac in 1977. ... The RIAA Logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Its So Easy (disambiguation). ... Poor Poor Pitiful Me is a rock song written by Warren Zevon. ... The Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance has been awarded since 1966. ... This article is about Kosh the art and television director. ...


This same year, she was asked by the L.A. Dodgers to sing the National Anthem at game three of the World Series against the New York Yankees.[75] The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


Time Magazine and Image

Ronstadt has remarked that she felt as though she was "artificially encouraged to kinda cop a really tough attitude (and be tough) because rock n roll is kind of a tough (business)" which she felt wasn't worn quite authentically [76]. Female rock artist like her and Janis Joplin, whom she described as lovely, shy and very literate in real life and the antithesis of the "red hot mamma" routine she was artificially encouraged to project, went through a identity crisis.[77] Ironically, as Ronstadt noted in the 1974 interview with Katherine Orloff, was that "women in rock and roll...have to compete with the boys..(which is) to talk as dirty and (to) have just as callous an attitude," even as a kid hunting with her father and brother she "wanted to (be tough) and just like my brother, carry my .22, which was bigger than I was"[78] Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This page deals with authenticity in philosophy. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... Look up Antithesis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Identity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A crisis (plural: crises) is a turning point or decisive moment in events. ...

Linda Ronstadt, on the cover of the February 28, 1977 issue of Time. Click on image and go to the "Article" and "Summary" section to read article and TIME reader's opinion on article.
Linda Ronstadt, on the cover of the February 28, 1977 issue of Time. Click on image and go to the "Article" and "Summary" section to read article and TIME reader's opinion on article.

Eventually, Linda Ronstadt's rock n roll image became just as famous as her music in mid 1970s.[79] The 1977 appearance on the cover of Time magazine under the banner "Torchy Rock" , especially for the most famous woman singer of the 1970s, and perhaps ever, at the time,[80] was notable and controversial for Ronstadt, considering what the image appeared to project about the most famous woman in rock.[81] At a time in the industry when men still told women what to sing and what to wear."[82] Ronstadt hated the image of her that was projected to the world,[83] on the cover of Time magazine no less, as she noted recently how the photographer kept forcing her to wear a dress, which was an image she did not want to project. [84] (Although she wore a rather revealing dress for the cover of Hasten Down the Wind which projected an image of her not all that different from the Time magazine cover). In 2004, she was interviewed for CBS This Morning[85] and stated that this image was not her because she didn't sit like that. The Time magazine cover did not stop critics but only helped critics in their claim that Ronstadt was her producer's puppet and encouraged critics who put her image and music together as reason to bash her, as Asher noted this irony, "anyone who's met Linda for 10 seconds will know that I couldn't possibly have been her Svengali. She's an extremely determined woman, in every area. To me, she was everything that feminism's about."[86]. Qualities, which Asher has stated, were considered a "negative (in a woman), whereas in a man they were perceived as being masterful and bold"[87] As noted, since her solo career began, Ronstadt fought hard to be recognized as a solo female singer in the world of rock,[88] and the Time cover, in the dress didn't appear to help the situation. To show how troublesome this Time cover is to her, recently Ronstadt refused to acknowledge that she was laying on the cover but was "sitting down...looking stupid". [89] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... The Early Show title card The Early Show is a American television morning news talk show broadcast by CBS from New York City, 7 to 9 a. ... Svengali is the name of a fictional hypnotist in George du Mauriers 1894 novel, Trilby. ...


Another iconic image of Ronstadt from this period, is her appearance in concert wearing a cub scout uniform, shirt half-unbuttoned with short shorts.


Later in 1977, Rolling Stone published for its cover, an alluring collection of photographs taken by Annie Leibovitz, which further created the image that Ronstadt, later said, wasn't pleased with. Ronstadt and Asher claim to have viewed the photos prior to publication and when asked that they be removed and the request was denied, they unceremoniously threw Leibovitz out of the house. This article is about the magazine. ... This article is about the American photographer. ...


In 1978, Rolling Stone magazine declared Linda Ronstadt, "by far America's best-known female rock singer."[90] She had a third No. 1 album on the Billboard 200, with Living In The USA and a major hit single with "Ooh Baby Baby", which hit all four major singles charts (Pop, AC, Country and even R&B). Another notable song is Warren Zevon's, "Mohammed's Radio," in which Godot turns out to be rock & roll and Mohammed's radio is the grail. Living In The USA was the first album by any recording act, in music history, to ship double platinum (over 2 million advanced copies).[91]. The album was eventually certified double platinum (over 2 million copies sold). This article is about the magazine. ... Living in the USA is a 1978 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Ooo Baby Baby is a 1965 hit single by The Miracles for the Tamla (Motown) label, today considered the groups signature song. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ... The name Godot can refer to three things: A character in the play Waiting for Godot, by Samuel Beckett. ...

Linda Ronstadt's promotional poster, for the 1978 Living In The USA album and concert
Linda Ronstadt's promotional poster, for the 1978 Living In The USA album and concert

By this stage of her career, Ronstadt's disc covers were big, bold and memorable. Living in the USA was no exception, showing the singer with a newly short haircut and on roller skates on the album cover. Ronstadt continued this theme on concert and tour promotional posters but this time there were photos of Ronstadt on roller skates and Ronstadt in a dramatic pose with a large American flag in the background. By this stage of her career, with every album released Ronstadt was going out and thoroughly promoting the album with posters because her image was just as famous as her music[92] and concerts - which at the time were even famously recorded live on radio and/or tv. Ronstadt was also featured in the 1978 film FM, where the plot involved disc jockeys attempting to illegally record and broadcast live, a Linda Ronstadt concert. The movie also showed Ronstadt live and in concert singing the hit song Tumbling Dice. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (603 × 833 pixel, file size: 80 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is used for the purposes of criticism and comment on the singer Linda Ronstadt According to section 107 of the United States Copyright Act... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (603 × 833 pixel, file size: 80 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is used for the purposes of criticism and comment on the singer Linda Ronstadt According to section 107 of the United States Copyright Act... Living in the USA is a 1978 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Flag ratio: 7:12; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars... FM is a 1978 movie directed by John A. Alonzo, and starring Michael Brandon, Eileen Brennan, Alex Karras and Cleavon Little. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Tumbling Dice is a rock song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards for The Rolling Stones 1972 double album Exile on Main St. ...


Keeping with this theme, Ronstadt conducted successful disc promotional tours and concerts. One notable concert in 1978 is Ronstadt's guest appearance onstage with The Rolling Stones at the Tucson Community Center on July 21, 1978 in her hometown of Tucson, where Ronstadt and Mick Jagger vocalized on "Tumbling Dice". Rolling Stones redirects here. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ...


Highest paid woman in rock

By the end of 1978, Ronstadt achieved unprecedented commercial success and became the "highest paid woman in rock",[93] and the first-ever woman able to command sell-out concerts in arenas and stadiums hosting tens of thousands of fans.[94] She had three No. 1 Pop albums, six platinum certified albums and numerous charted Pop singles. Billboard Magazine crowned Linda Ronstadt with Four No.1 Awards for the Year: No.1 Pop Female Singles Artist of the Year; No.1 Pop Female Album Artist of the Year; No.1 Female Record Artist of the Year; and the No.1 Female Vocalist of the Year.[95] In 1978 alone, she made over $12 million (equivalent to $38,000,000 today).[96] Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ...


As Rolling Stone magazine dubbed her "Rock's Venus",[97] her record sales continued to multiply and setting records themselves. By the end of the 1970s, Ronstadt had collected eight gold, six platinum and four multi-platinum certifications for her albums, an unprecedented feat at the time. Her 1976 Greatest Hits album was certified by the RIAA for 7 times platinum (over 7 million US copies sold). In 1980 Greatest Hits II was released, certified platinum (over 1 million copies sold). In 2007 a UK compilation album was released, combining Linda Ronstadt Greatest Hits I & II on one disc. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with RIAA certification. ... In 1976, singer Linda Ronstadt released a Greatest Hits album; but in later years, she also released several other greatest-hits and compilation albums: Greatest Hits - 1976 - 1980 Greatest Hits (with Rodney Crowell) - 1993 The Linda Ronstadt Box Set - 1999 (4-CD set with album tracks and some rarities) The... The RIAA Logo. ... In 1976, singer Linda Ronstadt released a Greatest Hits album; but in later years, she also released several other greatest-hits and compilation albums: Greatest Hits - 1976 - 1980 Greatest Hits (with Rodney Crowell) - 1993 The Linda Ronstadt Box Set - 1999 (4-CD set with album tracks and some rarities) The... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ... A UK compilation of Linda Ronstadts Greatest Hits I & II, released on one single disc and available in the U.S. as Greatest Hits, Vol. ...


By the end of the decade, Linda had outsold her female competition, no other female artist to date had five straight platinum LPs: Hasten Down the Wind, and Heart Like a Wheel among them.[98] Thereafter, Ronstadt was widely known and regarded in magazines and radio as the Queen of Rock,[99] and the Queen of Country-Rock. Hasten Down the Wind was Linda Ronstadts third major hit album, earning her a Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Female, in 1976. ... Heart Like A Wheel is a 1974 album by Linda Ronstadt. ...


This same year, Ronstadt went on a successful international tour, playing in arenas across Australia to Japan, including the Olympic Park Stadium in Melbourne, Australia and the Budokan in Tokyo, Japan. She also participated in benefit concert for her friend Lowell George, held at the The Forum, in Los Angeles, California. Olympic Park Stadium is a multi-purpose outdoor stadium located in Swan Street in inner Melbourne. ... The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... The Nippon Budokan Hall is an arena in central Tokyo. ... Tokyo (東京; Tōkyō, lit. ... Lowell George (born April 13, 1945 in Hollywood, CA - June 29, 1979) was an American musician, singer and guitarist, with the rock group Little Feat and as a solo artist. ... The Forum, known for a time as the Great Western Forum, is an indoor arena in Inglewood, California owned by the Faithful Central Bible Church, which uses it for its Sunday morning service. ...


Andrew Greeley in the book God in Popular Culture, described Ronstadt as "the most successful and certainly the most durable and most gifted woman Rock singer of her era."[100] The Rev. ...


From rock to Broadway

In 1980, Ronstadt recorded Mad Love, her sixth straight platinum selling album. Mad Love is a straightforward rock n roll album with strong post-punk, new wave influences, including tracks by songwriters such as Elvis Costello, The Cretones, and musician Mark Goldenberg who played on the record himself. This same year she also made the cover of Rolling Stone for the sixth time. Mad Love disc entered the Billboard album charts in the Top Five its first week (a record at that time) and climbed to the No. 3 position on the Billboard 200. In 1980, she continued her streak of Top 10 hits with "How Do I Make You?", "Hurt So Bad" and the Top 40 hit "I Can't Let Go". The album earned Ronstadt the 1980 Grammy nomination for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female (but she lost to Pat Benatar for "Crimes of Passion"). However, this same year Benatar praised Linda Ronstadt by stating, How can I be the best (female) rock singer, Ronstadt is still Alive![101] Mad Love is a 1980 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Mad Love is a 1980 album by Linda Ronstadt. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Cretones were a Los Angeles based new wave and power pop group in the early 1980s. ... Mad Love is a music album released by Robi Draco Rosa in April 2004 containing love themes in different musical genres. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...

Rex Smith, Linda Ronstadt and Kevin Kline, ca. 1980, from the The Pirates of Penzance Central Park production.
Rex Smith, Linda Ronstadt and Kevin Kline, ca. 1980, from the The Pirates of Penzance Central Park production.

In the summer of 1980, Ronstadt began rehearsals for the first of several leads in Broadway musicals. Joseph Papp cast her as the lead in the New York Shakespeare Festival production of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance, alongside Kevin Kline.[102] However, this endeavor wasn't, to Ronstadt, as far a left field endeavor as it might have appeard to Ronstadt's popular music audience. She recounts that singing Gilbert and Sullivan was a natural choice for her, since Grandfather Fred Ronstadt is credited with creating Tucson’s first orchestra, the Club Filarmonico Tucsonense and had once created an arrangement of Pirates of Penzance, likewise, her mother, Ruth Mary Copeman Ronstadt, owned a large Gilbert and Sullivan collection.[103] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image:RexSmith. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Joseph Papp (1921 - 1991) was an American theatre producer and director. ... New York Shakespeare Festival is the traditional name of a sequence of shows organized by the Public Theater in New York City, most often being held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Drawing of the Act I finale The Pirates of Penzance, or The Slave of Duty, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ... Kevin Delaney Kline (born October 24, 1947) is an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor. ... Nickname: The Old Pueblo Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Pima Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area    - City 505. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ...


The Pirates of Penzance revival turned out to be a major hit on Broadway. The musical opened for a limited engagement in New York City's Central Park and moved its production to Broadway where it ran from January 8, 1981 to November 28, 1982.[104] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


A DVD of the Central Park production was released in October 2002, but there is no recording of the Broadway run which followed. The "Central Park" disc is notable for its somewhat mediocre videotaping and sound quality, both a result of the outdoor location. Ronstadt also co-starred with Kline and Angela Lansbury in the 1983 motion picture version of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. Ronstadt received a Golden Globe nomination for the role in the movie version. The two versions (stage and for-film) are distinguishable by cover art. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Angela Lansbury CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a four-time Tony-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, three-time Oscar-nominated, and eighteen-time Emmy-nominated English actress. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


For her effort on Broadway, she garnered a Tony Award nomination for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical and The Pirates of Penzance won several Tony Awards, including a Tony Award for Best Revival. What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Drawing of the Act I finale The Pirates of Penzance, or The Slave of Duty, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ... The Tony Award for Best Revival was presented from 1977 until 1994, when it was split up int the Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical and the Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play. ...


In 1984, Ronstadt had discovered La Boheme through the silent movie with Lillian Gish and was determined to play the part of Mimi. When she mentioned it to her friend, opera superstar Beverly Sills, she was told, "my dear every soprano in the world wants to play Mimi." Ronstadt was later cast in the role of Mimi at Joseph Papp's Public Theatre.[105] La Bohème, French for The Bohemian Life, is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on La Vie de Bohème by Henri Murger. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... Beverly Sills (May 25, 1929 – July 2, 2007), born Belle Miriam Silverman, was perhaps the best-known American opera singer in the 1960s and 1970s. ...


In 1988, Ronstadt returned to Broadway, for a limited run engagement in the musical show adaptation of her 1988 album of Mexican folk songs, Canciones de Mi Padre - "My Father's Songs."[106] Canciones de Mi Padre (Spanish for Songs of My Father, or My Fathers Songs) was Linda Ronstadts first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. ...


After her stint on Broadway, Ronstadt went back to the studio to record more rock n roll music. In 1982, Ronstadt released Get Closer a rock n roll album with some country and pop music as well. The album is notable as it's her only album from 1974 (Heart Like A Wheel) to 1989 (Cry Like A Rainstorm) which did not receive a million-selling platinum certification by the RIAA (it did, however, sell in excess of 900,000 copies). It climbed to the No. 31 position on the Billboard 200. In 1982, she continued her streak of Top 40 hits with "Get Closer", and "I Knew You When", and the notable Jimmy Webb song "Easy For You To Say" which was a Top 10 AC hit. The album earned Ronstadt two Grammy Award nominations for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female as well as Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female. The album won its art director, Kosh his second Grammy Award for Best Album Package. Get Closer (1982) is Linda Ronstadts 11th studio album. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... This article is about Kosh the art and television director. ... The Grammy Award for Best Recording Package has been presented since 1974. ...


Along with the release of her Get Closer album, Ronstadt also embarked on a very successful North American tour, remaining one of the top rock concert draws that summer and fall. One notable and famous concert being her November 25, 1982 Happy Thanksgiving Day concert held at Dallas, Texas's Reunion Arena and broadcast live via satellite on radio stations across the United States[107] is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Thanksgiving is a holiday celebrated in much of North America, generally observed as an expression of gratitude, usually to God. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Reunion Arena is an indoor arena in the Reunion district of downtown Dallas, Texas (USA). ... For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ...


Branching out

Ronstadt has remarked that in the beginning of her career "(she)..was so focused on folk, rock and country that..(she) got a bit bored and started to branch out, and..(has) been doing that ever since."[108] By this stage of her career, Linda Ronstadt was reportedly worth over $40 million (equivalent to $81,000,000 today), mostly from successful rock n roll records and concerts.[109] Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Ronstadt eventually became tired of playing arenas.[110] She didn't feel that arenas, where people milled around lighting joints and buying beer, were "approriate places for music". She wanted "angels in the architecture" - a reference to a lyric in the Paul Simon song You Can Call Me Al. Likewise, she has noted that she wanted to sing in places similar to the Theatre of ancient Greece, where the attention is focused on the stage and performer.[111] Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... For other uses of Greek Theatre, see Greek theatre (disambiguation). ...


What's New

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1983, from the disc What's New

In 1983, a then 37-year old Ronstadt embarked on an unorthodox and original approach in rehabilitating the Great American Songbook when she recorded the first of what would be a trilogy of highly successful traditional pop albums alongside, the then 62-year-old grand master of pop orchestration, conductor Nelson Riddle: What's New (1983); Lush Life (1985); and For Sentimental Reasons (1986). The three have a combined sales of over 6 million copies sold in the U.S. alone. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Songwriter Harold Arlen (right) with singer Bing Crosby (left) and Decca Records owner Jack Kapp (center) Great American Songbook is an informal term referring to the interrelated music of Broadway musical theater, the Hollywood musical, and Tin Pan Alley, in a period that begins roughly in the 1920s and tapers... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Whats New is a 1983 Linda Ronstadt album consisting of nine songs of Traditional Pop music. ...


The album design for What's New by designer Kosh was unlike any of her past disc covers. But in keeping with the themes of her other discs it was bold, colorful and memorable. The cover seemed to playfully suggest what's new? It showed Ronstadt in a vintage dress lying on shimmering satin sheets with a walkman headset. At the time, Ronstadt received a lot of ridicule for both the album cover and her venture into what was then considered "elevator music." In a 1984 Saturday Night Live skit, comedienne Julia Louis-Dreyfus parodied Ronstadt by dressing and posing in a copy of the What's New cover while the title track played in the background. Louis-Dreyfus sang things like "I sing old songs for you, ‘Cause I can’t do what’s new!". This article is about Kosh the art and television director. ... Sony Walkman Official Logo (2000 — present) Various products of the Walkman line Walkman is a popular Sony brand used to market its portable audio and video players. ... This article is about the American television series. ... This article is about the American actress. ...


Ronstadt faced considerable pressure not to record What's New or record with Riddle. According to jazz historian Peter Levinson, author of the book September in the Rain - a Biography on Nelson Riddle, Joe Smith, president of Elektra Records, was terrified that the Nelson Riddle album would turn off Linda's rock audience.[112] Nonetheless, Ronstadt remained determined to record with Riddle. The gamble paid off, because when What's New was released in the Fall of 1983, it spent 82 weeks on the Billboard album charts and climbed to the No. 3 position (held out of the top spot by Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' and Lionel Richie's 'Can't Slow Down') and RIAA certified triple platinum (over 3 million copies sold). The album earned Ronstadt yet another Grammy nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female and critical raves, with Time Magazine calling it "one of the gutsiest, most unorthodox and unexpected albums of the year." [113] For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the occupation of studying history. ... September in the Rain is a popular song. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... The RIAA Logo. ... A certification, or qualification, is a designation earned by a person, product or process. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...


What's New brought Riddle back to a younger audience. According to Levinson "the younger audience hated what Nelson had done with Frank Sinatra,[114] which in 1983 was considered "Vintage Pop". Working with Linda, Nelson brought his career back into focus in the last three years of his life.[115] Stephen Holden of the New York Times wrote, What's New "isn't the first album by a rock singer to pay tribute to the golden age of the pop, but is . . the best and most serious attempt to rehabilitate an idea of pop that Beatlemania and the mass marketing of rock LPs for teen-agers undid in the mid-60s . . . In the decade prior to Beatlemania, most of the great band singers and crooners of the 40s and 50s codified a half-century of American pop standards on dozens of albums . . . many of them now long out-of-print."[116] Thus, What's New is notable for being the first album by a rock singer to have major commercial success in rehabilitating the Great American Songbook.[117] Sinatra redirects here. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Whats New is a 1983 Linda Ronstadt album consisting of nine songs of Traditional Pop music. ... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Songwriter Harold Arlen (right) with singer Bing Crosby (left) and Decca Records owner Jack Kapp (center) Great American Songbook is an informal term referring to the interrelated music of Broadway musical theater, the Hollywood musical, and Tin Pan Alley, in a period that begins roughly in the 1920s and tapers...


In 2004, Ronstadt released Hummin' to Myself, her first studio album for Verve Records. It was her first foray into traditional pop since her records with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, but this time with a smaller jazz combo. Not having the mass distribution Warner Music gave her, Hummin' to Myself sold 100,000 copies in the US alone, relatively successful for a small record label like Verve Records and it did achieve notable critical acclaim from the jazz cognoscenti. [118] Hummin’ to Myself is a 2004 Linda Ronstadt album. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... Warner Music Group is one of the Big Four record labels. ...


The Trio recordings

In 1978, Ronstadt, with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, began recording a Trio album. The attempt failed. Ronstadt later remarked that not too many people were focused at the time and everyone was too involved with their own careers. This concept album was put on the back burner for almost ten years. Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American, Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ...


However, in 1987, the three eventually did make their way into the recording studio and finally released the album Trio, which they first had conceived of ten years earlier. It was a considerable hit, holding the No. 1 position on Billboard's Country Albums chart for five weeks running and hitting the Top 10 on the Pop side also. It sold several million copies and won them a Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal and produced four top-ten country singles including "To Know Him Is To Love Him" which hit No. 1. Trio was a 1987 album featuring country and rock superstars Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt. ...


In 1999, Linda reunited with Dolly Parton and EmmyLou Harris for the Trio 2 album, the long-anticipated follow up to their 1987 Trio album. It included "After The Gold Rush" which became a popular music video. The effort was certified Gold (over 500,000 copies sold) and won them a Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals for the track. Ronstadt co-produced the album with George Massenburg. A dozen years after the release of their original Trio album, the country music supergroup returned with another in the same vein. ... George Y. Massenburg (b. ...


Canciones - songs of her family

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1987, on the cover of the Grammy winning album and 2X platinum certified Canciones de Mi Padre - "My Father's Songs.".
Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1987, on the cover of the Grammy winning album and 2X platinum certified Canciones de Mi Padre - "My Father's Songs.".

In 1987, Ronstadt recorded an album of Mexican folk songs, or what she describes as "world class songs", titled Canciones de Mi Padre - "My Father's Songs". Keeping with the Ronstadt theme, her cover art was dramatic, bold, and colorful. For Canciones de Mi Padre Ronstadt was in full Mexican dress and her musical arranger was famed Mariachi musician Rubén Fuentes. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Canciones de Mi Padre (Spanish for Songs of My Father, or My Fathers Songs) was Linda Ronstadts first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. ... Canciones de Mi Padre (Spanish for Songs of My Father, or My Fathers Songs) was Linda Ronstadts first album of Mexican traditional mariachi music. ... Rubén Fuentes is a classical violinist and composer, who is best known for his contributions to mariachi music. ...


These canciones were a big part of Ronstadt's family tradition and musical roots. For example, the history of this album goes back half a century. In January, 1946, the University of Arizona published a booklet by Luisa Espinel entitled Canciones de mi Padre.[119] Luisa Espinel was Linda Ronstadt's aunt and an international singer in the 1920s. Ms. Espinel's father was Fred Ronstadt (Linda Ronstadt's grandfather), and the songs she had learned, transcribed and published were some of the ones he had brought with him from Sonora. Linda Ronstadt researched and extracted from the favorites she had learned from her father Gilbert and she called her album by the same name as her aunt's booklet and as a tribute to her father and his family. Though not fully bilingual, she has a fairly good command of the Spanish language, allowing her to sing Latin American songs without any accent; Linda has often identified herself as Mexican-American.[120] Her formative years were spent with her father's side of the family.[121]Also, Ronstadt has credited Mexican singer Lola Beltran as an influence in her own singing style, and she recalls how a frequent guest to the Ronstadt home, Eduardo “Lalo” Guerrero, father of Chicano music, would often serenade her as child. [122] The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Sonora is a state in northwestern Mexico, bordering the states of Chihuahua to the east, Sinaloa to the south, and Baja California to the northwest. ... Lola Beltrán on the cover of one of her albums Lola Beltrán (born María Lucila Beltrán Ruiz on March 7, 1932 in Rosario, Sinaloa – died March 24, 1996 in Mexico City) was one of the greatest Mexican ranchera singers, nicknamed Lola la Grande (Lola the Great... Eduardo Lalo Guerrero (December 24, 1916 – March 17, 2005), credited as being the father of Chicano music, was a Mexican-American guitarist, singer and farm labor activist best known for his strong influence on todays Latin artists. ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... Serenade by Judith Leyster. ...


This album won Ronstadt a Grammy Award for Best Mexican-American Performance. The album has been RIAA certified double-platinum (over 2 million U.S. copies sold), although it only reached #42 on the Billboard 200 pop album charts, however it spent over 35 weeks on the charts. The RIAA Logo. ...


Ronstadt produced and performed a theatrical stage show in concert halls across the United States and Latin America to both hispanic and non-hispanic audiences, including on the Great White Way. She called the stage show by the same name Canciones de mi Padre. These performances were released on DVD. Ronstadt elected to return to the Broadway stage, 4 years after she performed La Boheme, for a limited run engagement. PBS Great Performances aired the celebrated stage show during its annual fund drives and the show was a hit with audiences, earning Ronstadt an Emmy Award for Individual Performance In A Variety Or Music Program. A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... Great White Way is a nickname for Broadway in the Midtown Manhattan section of New York City, specifically that stretch that encompasses the Theater District, between 42nd and 53rd streets. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Individual Performance In A Variety Or Music Program winners: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ...


She recorded two additional discs of Latin music in the early 1990's. Although they did not sell as well as Canciones de Mi Padre and failed to chart as high on the Billboard charts, they were critically acclaimed. The first one she recorded was Mas Canciones a follow up to the first Canciones. For this effort she won a Grammy award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album. The same year she stepped outside of Mariachi and decided to record well known "afro-Cuban" songs. This disc was titled Frenesi. However, like her second Latin recording venture, the disc failed to chart high on the Billboard charts but was critically acclaimed and won Ronstadt another Grammy award, this time for Best Traditional Tropical Latin Album. The Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album has been awarded since 1984. ... The Grammy Award for Best Traditional Tropical Latin Album has been awarded since 1984. ...


A return to the Pop/Rock album charts

Ronstadt made a return to the top of the Pop/Rock chart in 1987 when she achieved a Billboard Hot 100 chart No. 2 hit with the "Somewhere Out There" recorded as a duet with James Ingram and featured in the animated film An American Tail. The song was nominated for both a Grammy Award and Academy Award for Motion Picture song. It also achieved commercial success, certified Gold (over 500,000 copies sold). On the heels of this success, Steven Spielberg asked Ronstadt again to record the title song, this time for the sequel to Americal Tail, titled American Tail: Fievel Goes West. The song she recorded was "Dreams to Dream" although it failed to achieve the same success as its predecessor, the song did give Ronstadt a modest Adult Contemporary hit in 1991. Somewhere Out There may refer to: A song from the film An American Tail. ... James Ingram (born February 16, 1956 in Akron, Ohio) is an American soul musician, famous for his vocal performance. ... An American Tail is an animated film produced by Steven Spielbergs Amblin Entertainment, and directed by Don Bluth, originally released in movie theatres on November 21, 1986. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...


However, Ronstadt did make a full focused return to the mainstream pop charts in 1989, releasing both an album and a couple of popular singles. This effort titled Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind became one of the singers biggest albums, in terms of production, arrangements, chart sales, and critical acclaim. The album returned Ronstadt, as a solo artist, back to the top 10 of the Billboard album charts, reaching the No. 7 position and went triple platinum (over 3 million US copies sold) and singles charts simultaneously. The album also received critical acclaim, nominated for numerous Grammy awards. She even featured American soul singer Aaron Neville on four of the twelve disc cuts. Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind is a 1989 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring soul singer Aaron Neville. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ...


For this major disc, Ronstadt incorporated the sounds of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, Tower of Power horns, the Skywalker Symphony and numerous musicians. It had duets including "Don't Know Much" (Billboard Hot 100 chart No. 2 hit) and "All My Life" (Billboard Hot 100 chart No. 11 hit), and equally long-running No. 1 Adult Contemporary hits. These duets with singer Aaron Neville received much critical acclaim, garnering several Grammy nominations and won Ronstadt 1989's Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal - she shared the honor with Aaron Neville. For the episode of the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon TV series, see Tower of Power (TMNT 1987 episode). ... Dont Know Much is a song written by Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil and Tom Snow and made famous when performed as a duet by Linda Ronstadt and Aaron Neville on Ronstadts 1989 album Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ...


In fact, her Grammy appearance in February, 1990, was notable because this was Ronstadt's last live Grammy Award appearance, even though she has won five additional Grammy Awards since then. She hasn't even watched the Grammys since then.[123]. Their appearance was the first time they had performed the song for the public ever since the song had become a hit the previous year in December, 1989. The following year Ronstadt won a Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for the single, "All My Life", with Aaron Neville. The Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal has been awarded since 1966. ...


In December 1990, Linda Ronstadt participated in a concert to commemorate John Lennon's 50th birthday, and to raise awareness of environmental issues, held in Tokyo at the Tokyo Dome. Other participants included Miles Davis, Lenny Kravitz, Hall & Oates, Natalie Cole, notable Japanese artists, Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon. A CD resulted, titled Happy Birthday, John.[124] John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Tokyo Dome Baseball at the Tokyo Dome The Tokyo Dome and the amusement park Tokyo Dome City Attractions. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... Leonard Albert Lenny Kravitz (born May 26, 1964) is an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and arranger whose retro style incorporates elements of rock, soul, funk, reggae, hard rock, psychedelic, folk, and ballads. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ...


Ronstadt continues to be original and explore different manners in which to introduce classic music, in a new and unorthodox fashion. For example, in 1996, Ronstadt produced Dedicated to the One I Love, an album of rock 'n roll songs reinvented as children's music. This effort won her and longtime collaborator, recording engineer George Massenburg, Grammys for Best Album for Children. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Audio engineering is the branch of engineering dealing with the production of sound through mechanical means. ... George Y. Massenburg (b. ... The Grammy Award for Best Album for Children has been awarded since 1959. ...


On November 16, 1999 Elektra/Wea released The Linda Ronstadt Box Set. The Box Set includes a total of four discs arranged thematically rather than chronologically with five hours of eighty-six songs that highlight Ronstadt’s eclectic career. The Box Set includes very detailed liner notes, rare photos, and interesting facts, including how Linda Ronstadt was the first female performer to chalk up seven consecutive platinum albums. First, there are two CDs that essentially serve as best-of sets. Disc three consists of duets with the likes of Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, Aaron Neville, and Frank Sinatra. Disc four, offers rarities, including her contributions to Randy Newman's Faust and a contribution to Carla Bley's jazz opera Escalator Over the Hill and songs off 1978's Living in the USA and 1980's Mad Love period that didn’t make it onto the albums in addition to some live contribution and "All I Have To Do Is Dream" with Kermit the Frog. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kermit singing Bein Green in the first season of Sesame Street. ...


In 2000, Linda Ronstadt completed her long contractual relationship with Elektra/Asylum which had now become part of the Warner Music Group. The fulfillment of this contract was the release of A Merry Little Christmas, her first holiday collection, which included rare choral works, the song "River" by Joni Mitchell, and a rare recorded duet with Rosemary Clooney on her signature song, White Christmas. Since leaving Warner Music, Ronstadt has gone on to work under the Verve and Vanguard Record labels. Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Look up verve in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Vanguard Records was a record label set up in 1950 by brothers Maynard and Seymour Solomon in New York. ...


A return to roots music

One of the world's leading magazines for commercial and project studio recording, MIX Magazine, stated that "Ronstadt (has) left her mark on more than the record business; her devotion to the craft of singing influenced many audio professionals.... (and is) intensely knowledgeable about the mechanics of singing and the cultural contexts of every genre she passes"[125] In fact, in 2004 Linda wrote the Forward Introduction to the book titled The NPR Curious Listener's Guide To American folk music,[126] and in 2005 she wrote the Introduction to the book titled Classic Ferrington Guitars, about guitar-maker and luthier Danny Ferrington and his custom guitars that have been created for various musicians from Ronstadt, Elvis Costello, and Ry Cooder to Kurt Cobain.[127] On August 3, 2007, Ronstadt headlined the Newport Folk Festival, making her debut at this prestigous event, where she incorporated jazz, rock and folk music into her repertoire. In an essay or article, an introduction is a beginning section which states the purpose and goals of the following writing. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... An engravers impression of Antonio Stradivari examining an instrument. ... The classical guitar typically has nylon strings. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ...

Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1998, from the disc We Ran
Linda Ronstadt, ca. 1998, from the disc We Ran

Signaling a recording return to more folksy roots, Ronstadt released several folk rock records with a more adult rock-oriented edge during this decade as well, including: Winter Light (1993), Feels Like Home (1995), Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... We Ran is a 1998 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt. ... Adult Album Alternative (also Triple-A, AAA, or adult alternative) is a radio format broadcast mostly on FM. A spin off of the Album-oriented rock format, its roots may have been established sometime during the 60s from what was called underground music and later progressive. ... Winter Light is a 1993 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt. ...


In 1998 Ronstadt recorded We Ran. The disc cover is notable for its non-dramatic photo, unlike the colorful and memorable disc covers that Ronstadt was famous for throughout her career. It was unlike her album covers over the years that won three Grammy Awards for artist Kosh. Although inside the disc, the music harkens back to Ronstadt's country-rock and folk-rock heyday. This is confirmed by Ronstadt returning to her rock n roll roots with vivid interpretation of songs by Bruce Springsteen, Doc Pomus, Bob Dylan and John Hiatt. The disc was produced by notable rock producer, Glyn Johns. The album is notable for being Ronstadt's few albums failing to hit the Top 100, on the Billboard album chart. We Ran also failed to chart any hit singles on both the Pop and AC charts. Although, the disc was well received by critics. Her vocal performance on the track "Cry 'till My Tears Run Dry" is particularly worthy of note, and demonstrated how much her voice had grown, since her early, somewhat raw, country music performances. We Ran is a 1998 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt. ... This article is about Kosh the art and television director. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Doc Pomus (January 27, 1925 - March 14, 1991) was an American blues singer and songwriter, active throughout the 20th century. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Glyn Johns (born February 15, 1942 in Epsom, Surrey, England) is a recording engineer and record producer. ...


Despite the lack of success of We Ran, Ronstadt kept towards this adult rock exploration, when she released Western Wall — The Tucson Sessions (1999), a folk-rock oriented project with EmmyLou Harris. It earned a Grammy nomination for Best Contemporary Folk Album, and made the Top 10 of Billboard's Country Albums chart and the Top 100 of the Billboard album chart by debuting at No. 73. They had a modest alternative rock hit with Sweet Spot, a song that was written with and recorded with Jill Cunniff of Lucious Jackson. Western Wall — The Tucson Sessions is a 1999 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring Emmylou Harris . ... Lucious Brown Jackson (born October 31, 1941 in San Marcos, Texas) is a former pro basketball player. ...


This same year Ronstadt went back to her concert roots, of sorts, when she performed with The Eagles and Jackson Browne at Staples Center's 1999 New Year's Eve celebration kicking off the December 31 end-of-the-millennium festivities. As Staples Center Senior Vice President and General Manager Bobby Goldwater said. "It was our goal to present a spectacular event as a sendoff to the 20th century", and "The Eagles, Jackson Browne, and Linda Ronstadt are three of the most popular acts of the century. Their performances will constitute a singular and historic night of entertainment for New Year's Eve in Los Angeles.[128] The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Staples Center is a multipurpose sports arena in Downtown Los Angeles, California adjacent to the LA Live development. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A millennium (pl. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ...

Japanese and Australian cover of the disc Adieu False Heart. Linda Ronstadt with Ann Savoy, ca. 2006,
Japanese and Australian cover of the disc Adieu False Heart. Linda Ronstadt with Ann Savoy, ca. 2006,

In 2006, as the ZoZo Sisters, Ronstadt teamed with longtime friend, musician and musical scholar Ann Savoy to record Adieu False Heart, an album of roots music incorporating pop, Cajun, and early 20th century music, for Vanguard Records. The disc was released to an international market, and notable for having different covers, one showing artistic farm art and the other prominently showing Ronstadt and Savoy - this being the international cover, primarily in Australia and Japan. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adieu False Heart is a 2006 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring Cajun music singer Ann Savoy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Adieu False Heart is a 2006 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring Cajun music singer Ann Savoy. ...


Adieu False Heart, recorded in Louisiana, features a cast of local musicians, including Chas Justus, Eric Frey and Kevin Wimmer of the Red Stick Ramblers, Sam Broussard of The Mamou Playboys, Dirk Powell and Joel Savoy, as well as an array of Nashville musicians: fiddler Stuart Duncan, mandolinist Sam Bush and guitarist Bryan Sutton. The recording earned two Grammy nominations: Best Traditional Folk Album and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical. On the heels of Adieu False Heart''s critical and international commercial success, as of 2007, Ronstadt is in the studio with Ann Savoy recording a follow-up disc. This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Career achievements

  • As of the end of 2006, Ronstadt's albums have earned her three No. 1 albums on the Billboard 200, four No. 1 albums on Billboard's Country Album chart, 10 Top 10 pop albums and 27 Top 100 pop albums.
  • As of the end of 2006, Ronstadt's singles have earned her a No. 1 single and three No. 2 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, 10 Top 10 pop singles, 21 Top 40 pop singles, two No. 1 hits on the Billboard Country Single chart, two No. 1 hits and 37 Top 40 hits on Billboard's Adult Contemporary charts
  • Cash Box named her the top-selling female pop singer of the 1970s.[131]
  • Her RIAA certification (audits paid for by record companies or artist for promotion) tally as of 2001, now totals 19 Gold, 14 Platinum and 8 Multi-Platinum albums.[132] as well as 3 Gold and even 1 Platinum single release. In all, Ronstadt has been certified by the RIAA for sales in excess of 50 million albums worldwide and 30 million albums sold in the U.S. alone, as of 2001. However, Ronstadt's Real Sales (statistics used to pay the artist their royalties) information indicate that several more certifications are currently in effect and being upgraded. Since there is a wide difference between real sales and certifications, Ronstadt shows real sales of 48 million album units moved in the US and nearly 70 millions album units sold worldwide. [133]
  • She was the first female in music history to score 4 consecutive platinum albums and ultimately racked up a total of 8 consecutive platinum albums.[134]
  • Her album Living In The USA is notable for being the first album by any singer, in music history, to ship double platinum (over 2 million advanced copies).[135]
  • At the time of its release, Canciones de mi Padre became the best-selling non-English-language album in American history.
  • Ronstadt has served as record producer on various albums from musicians David Lindley and Aaron Neville to singer-songwriter Jimmy Webb.[136] She produced Cristal — Glass Music Through the Ages, an album of classical music using glass instruments with Dennis James, and Ronstadt singing on several of the arrangements.[137] In 1999, Linda also produced the Grammy Award winning Trio 2.
  • Linda Ronstadt was the first female solo artist to have two Top 40 singles simultaneously on Billboard magazine's Hot 100: "Blue Bayou" and "It's So Easy" (October 1977). By December, both "Blue Bayou" and "It's So Easy" had climbed into Billboard's Top 5 and remained there for the entire month. Linda Ronstadt's run on the Billboard charts includes one single or album charted every year from 1970 to 2000.

The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... 1000 Airplanes on the Roof is an opera by Philip Glass which featured lyrics by David Henry Hwang and projections by Jerome Sirlin. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Graceland is an album released in 1986 by Paul Simon. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Mr. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American, Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... This article is about the musician. ... J.D. Souther, born John David Souther on November 3, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Amarillo, Texas, is a singer-songwriter and country rock singer. ... Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band is an American country-folk-rock band that has existed in various forms since the original founding in California in 1965. ... Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ... The Eagles redirects here. ... Andrew Gold (born August 2, 1951, in Burbank, California) is an American singer, musician and songwriter, best known for his 1976 Top 5 single Lonely Boy and the 1978 single Thank You For Being A Friend. Andrews parents were singer Marni Nixon (who provided the singing voice for numerous... Hoyt Axton on the cover of Southbound (1975) Hoyt Wayne Axton (March 25, 1938 – October 26, 1999) was an American country music singer-songwriter, and a film and television actor. ... Kate and Anna McGarrigle are a Canadian folk music duo from Quebec. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Karla Bonoff (born December 27, 1951) is an American singer/songwriter. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ... Maria Muldaur (Born Maria DAmato on September 12, 1943 in New York) is a roots-folk singer best known for her song Midnight at the Oasis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nicolette Larson (July 17, 1952 - December 16, 1997) was a singer best known for Lotta Love, which peaked at #8 on Billboard Magazines Hot 100 chart in 1978. ... Since its inception in 1971, the Seldom Scene has thrived on playing bluegrass a little differently than everyone else. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ... Simple Dreams was the most successful of Linda Ronstadts studio albums, spending five weeks at number one on the Billboard album charts and finally debunking Fleetwood Macs Rumours from the top spot in 1977, not to mention the competition from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. ... Whats New is a 1983 Linda Ronstadt album consisting of nine songs of Traditional Pop music. ... Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind is a 1989 album by American singer Linda Ronstadt featuring soul singer Aaron Neville. ... The RIAA Logo. ... In 1976, singer Linda Ronstadt released a Greatest Hits album; but in later years, she also released several other greatest-hits and compilation albums: Greatest Hits - 1976 - 1980 Greatest Hits (with Rodney Crowell) - 1993 The Linda Ronstadt Box Set - 1999 (4-CD set with album tracks and some rarities) The... Cash Box magazine was a weekly publication devoted to the music and coin-operated machine industry. ... The RIAA Logo. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... David Lindley (born 1944 in San Marino, California) is an American guitarist and multi-instrumentalist (his instruments include a variety of stringed instruments such as banjo, lap steel guitar, violin, oud, cittern, bouzouki, saz, and cümbüş). During 1966 to 1970 he was part of the eclectic psychedelic band Kaleidoscope. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ... Jimmy Webb (born August 15, 1946 in Elk City, Oklahoma) is an idiosyncratic American popular music composer. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... Tropical Tropical indicates a Latin beat music format from the Caribbean. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Tropical Tropical indicates a Latin beat music format from the Caribbean. ... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Sarah Brightman (born August 14, 1960) is an English classical crossover soprano, actress and dancer. ... This biographical article or section needs additional references for verification. ... Lowell George (born April 13, 1945 in Hollywood, CA - June 29, 1979) was an American musician, singer and guitarist, with the rock group Little Feat and as a solo artist. ... Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock and roll musician and songwriter. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... J.D. Souther, born John David Souther on November 3, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Amarillo, Texas, is a singer-songwriter and country rock singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Patty Griffin, born March 16, 1964, is an American singer-songwriter from Old Town, Maine, United States, next to the Penobscot Indian reservation. ... Sinéad Marie Bernadette OConnor (IPA: [1]) (born December 8, 1966) is a Grammy Award winning Irish singer and songwriter. ... Julie Miller (born 3 January 1956 in Dallas, Texas) is a country songwriter, singer, and recording artist currently living in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Mel Tillis (born Lonnie Melvin Tillis August 8, 1932 in Tampa, Florida) is an American Country Music Singer. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer and guitarist. ... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... John Hiatt (born August 20, 1952 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American rock guitarist, pianist, singer, and songwriter. ... The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel-string guitar playing and close harmony... Springsteen redirects here. ... For other persons named George Jones, see George Jones (disambiguation). ... Often tagged a blues singer, the U.S. vocalist Tracy Nelson has explored a wide range of popular music styles including folk, rock, and country. ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers were an early country rock band, best known for their massively influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... ...and then I met Lowell George. ... This article is about the musician. ... The Miracles (known from 1965 to 1972 as Smokey Robinson & the Miracles) are an American musical group from Detroit, Michigan, notable as the first successful group act for Berry Gordys Motown Records. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Joe Melson (born May, 1935), is an American singer and a BMI award winning songwriter. ... For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ...

Awards

Grammy Awards

  • 1975 - Best Country Vocal Performance, Female, "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)" from Heart Like a Wheel
  • 1976 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, Hasten Down the Wind
  • 1980 - Best Musical Album for Children, In Harmony: A Sesame Street Record (multiple artist compilation w/ Linda Ronstadt)
  • 1987 - Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, Trio (with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris)
  • 1988 - Best Mexican-American Performance, Canciones de Mi Padre
  • 1989 - Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, "Don't Know Much" from Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind with Aaron Neville
  • 1990 - Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, "All My Life" from Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind with Aaron Neville
  • 1992 - Best Mexican-American Album, Mas Canciones
  • 1992 - Best Tropical Latin Album, Frenesi
  • 1996 - Best Musical Album for Children, Dedicated to the One I Love
  • 1999 - Best Country Collaboration with Vocals, "After the Gold Rush" from Trio II with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris

The 17th Grammy Awards were held in 1975, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 18th Grammy Awards were held in 1976, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 22nd Grammy Awards were held in 1980, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 29th Grammy Awards were held in 1987. ... The 30th Grammy Awards were held March 2, 1988. ... The 31st Grammy Awards were held in 1989. ... The 32nd Grammy Awards were held in 1990. ... The 34th Grammy Awards were held on February 26, 1992. ... The 34th Grammy Awards were held on February 26, 1992. ... The 38th Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1996. ... The 41st Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1999. ...

Grammy Award nominations

  • 1970 - Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female, "Long, Long Time" from Silk Purse
  • 1975 - Album of the Year, Heart Like a Wheel
  • 1975 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, Heart Like a Wheel
  • 1977 - Record of the Year, "Blue Bayou" from Simple Dreams
  • 1977 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, "Blue Bayou" from Simple Dreams
  • 1980 - Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, "How Do I Make You" from Mad Love
  • 1982 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, "Get Closer" from the album Get Closer
  • 1982 - Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, "Get Closer" from the album Get Closer
  • 1983 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, What's New
  • 1985 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, Lush Life
  • 1987 - Album of the Year, Trio with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris
  • 1987 - Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, "Somewhere Out There" from the soundtrack to An American Tail with James Ingram
  • 1989 - Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind
  • 1999 - Best Country Album, Trio II with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris
  • 1999 - Best Contemporary Folk Album, Western Wall: The Tucson Sessions with Emmylou Harris
  • 2002 - Best Traditional Folk Album, Evangeline Made: A Tribute to Cajun Music, multiple artist compilation, with vocalist Ann Savoy
  • 2006 - Best Traditional Folk Album, Adieu False Heart with Ann Savoy

The 12th Grammy Awards were held in 1970. ... The 17th Grammy Awards were held in 1975, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 17th Grammy Awards were held in 1975, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 19th Grammy Awards were held in 1977, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 19th Grammy Awards were held in 1977, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 22nd Grammy Awards were held in 1980, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 24th Grammy Awards were held in 1982, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 24th Grammy Awards were held in 1982, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 25th Grammy Awards were held in 1983. ... The 27th Grammy Awards were held February 26, 1985, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 29th Grammy Awards were held in 1987. ... The 29th Grammy Awards were held in 1987. ... The 31st Grammy Awards were held in 1989. ... The 41st Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1999. ... The 41st Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1999. ... The 44th Grammy Awards were held on February 27, 2002. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Emmy Award

  • 1989 - Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program, Linda Ronstadt, Great Performances: Canciones de Mi Padre

Tony Award nomination

  • 1981 - Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical, Linda Ronstadt in The Pirates of Penzance as "Mabel"

Golden Globe Award nomination

  • 1983 - Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical or Comedy, Linda Ronstadt in The Pirates of Penzance

Discography

This is a discography for singer Linda Ronstadt. ...

References

  1. ^ artist page Rolling Stone. Artist Page. Retrieved on May 13, 2007.
  2. ^ Linda Ronstadt. Album and Guest Appearances, research by Eric Herni. Retrieved on August 30, 2007.
  3. ^ Dirty Linen Issue#106. Linda Ronstadt Silver Threads & Golden Needles by T.J. McGrath. Retrieved on May 5, 2007.
  4. ^ We Gotta Get Out of This Place: The True, Tough Story of Women in Rock. By Gerri Hirshey,Grove Press, p.86. Retrieved on May 11, 2007.
  5. ^ Dirty Linen, Issue #106. Linda Ronstadt Silver Threads & Golden Needles by T.J. McGrath. Retrieved on May 7, 2007.
  6. ^ Rolling Stone. Cover Story, Rock's Venus. Retrieved on May 5, 2007.
  7. ^ New York Magazine. Linda Ronstadt, Pirate Queen. Retrieved on May 5, 2007.
  8. ^ Stranded- Rock and Roll for a Desert Island, essay by John Rockwell. Living in the USA. Retrieved on May 7, 2007.
  9. ^ Playboy. Playboy Interview: Linda Ronstadt. Retrieved on October 29, 2006.
  10. ^ Cashbox. Special Decade Award. Retrieved on June 24, 2007.
  11. ^ Family Week=. Linda Ronstadt: The Gamble Pays off Big. Retrieved on April 9, 2007.
  12. ^ Joel Whitburn's The Billboard Albums. Linda Ronstadt's Top Pop Albums. Retrieved on April 19, 2007.
  13. ^ Ronstadt Facts, Investigative International Sales. Linda Ronstadt Record Sales Information Page (German Site). Retrieved on April 17, 2007.
  14. ^ Official Linda Ronstadt Verve Web Page. Verve Records. Retrieved on May 25, 2007.
  15. ^ The Real Deal. The San Diego Union Tribue. Retrieved on May 25, 2007.
  16. ^ Dirty Linen Issue#106. Linda Ronstadt Silver Threads & Golden Needles by T.J. McGrath. Retrieved on May 7, 2007.
  17. ^ Borderman: Memoirs of Federico José María Ronstadt. Retrieved on May 7, 2007.
  18. ^ Gilbert Ronstadt. Biography on Glbert Ronstadt(1911-1995). Retrieved on May 17, 2007.
  19. ^ Playboy. Playboy Interview: Linda Ronstadt. Retrieved on October 29, 2006.
  20. ^ The People. Early Pioneers of Tucson. Retrieved on May 16, 2007.
  21. ^ Songs From Her Heart. Retrieved on October 30, 2006.
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is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...

Articles and Interviews

  • Creem Magazine, A Heart To Heart with Linda Ronstadt (December 1976)
  • Linda Ronstadt: Melancholy Baby, Esquire, (October 1985)
  • Linda Ronstadt rocks with jazz sophistication (August 4, 2007)
  • Linda Ronstadt plays NPR's "WaitWait...Don't Tell Me!" (April 28, 2007)
  • Linda Ronstadt radio interview on KQED with Michael Krasny, Forum, (July 19, 2006)
  • Linda Ronstadt lets wisdom strike notes, The Honolulu Advertiser (March 31, 2006)
  • San Diego Union-Tribune interview
  • Tucson Citizen report of the Aladdin incident
  • Edmonton Sun interview "Linda Ronstadt defends her politics" (August 10, 2006)
  • Calgary Sun "Ronstadt still sings sweetly" (August 10, 2006)
  • Linda Ronstadt's interview with Tavis Smiley
  • Kudos To Linda Ronstadt by James Donahue
  • The Weekend Australian: Everlasting Linda, by Debbie Kruger, (July 19, 1998)

External links

  • The Definitive Linda Ronstadt Homepage (Unofficial but Comprehensive)
  • Linda Ronstadt Fan's Forum
  • Linda Ronstadt page on WikiMusicGuide
  • The UK Linda Ronstadt website
  • The German Linda Ronstadt website with real international chartsales & music awards database, etc.
  • Linda Ronstadt discography
  • Lloyd Copeman Prolific Inventor Homepage
  • Tucson's Ronstadt Family History of the Ronstadt family
  • Linda Ronstadt at the Internet Movie Database
  • VIRB.com site
  • Future Rock n Roll Hall of Fame Induction chances and Information

  Results from FactBites:
 
Linda Ronstadt Tickets, Linda Ronstadt Concert Tickets at StubHub! (411 words)
Linda Ronstadt concert tickets are available, and this star of music in general has been lighting up venues for more than 30 years.
Ronstadt is known above all else for her diversity, as she has performed songs that fall into the rock and roll, country, blues, folk, new wave and even opera genres.
Ronstadt was born in Tucson, Arizona on July 15, 1946, and she got into music while a student at the University of Arizona.
divastation: linda ronstadt (938 words)
when ronstadt was eighteen, she followed her muse to los angeles, banding together with a folk group known as the stone poneys.
though, in retrospect, ronstadt is reluctant to recognize the glamourous image that the multitude of her fans perceived, it is undeniable that songs like her debut solo hit, "you're no good", thrust her into the center of the folk/rock scene for the remainder of the decade.
what little is known about ronstadt's current life has her living in san francisco, california, with an adopted daugther—a domestic bliss which may have inspired appearances with the muppets and the release of dedicated to the one i love, an album of children's songs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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