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Encyclopedia > Lincoln's Inn Fields

Lincoln's Inn Fields is the largest public square in London. It was laid out in part by Inigo Jones in the 17th century and opened to the public after its acquisition by London County Council in 1895. It takes its name from the adjacent Lincoln's Inn, but should not be confused with the private gardens of Lincoln's Inn itself. Lincoln's Inn is separated from Lincoln's Inn Fields by a perimeter wall and a large gatehouse. London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573 - June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The County of London, shown within a map of Englands 1890 counties London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London from 1889 until 1965, when it was replaced by the Greater London Council. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Lincolns Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. ... Lincolns Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. ...


At number 13, on the north side of the square, is Sir John Soane's Museum, home of the architect. Organizations with premises on the south side of the square include Cancer Research UK, the Royal College of Surgeons of England (including the Hunterian Museum exhibiting the intriguing medical collections of John Hunter) and the Land Registry. There is a blue plaque marking the home of the surgeon William Marsden at number 65. The Soane Museum is a museum of architecture, and was formerly the house and studio of Sir John Soane. ... Cancer Research UK is a United Kingdom based charity, established in 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. ... The Royal College of Surgeons of England is an independent professional body committed to promoting and advancing the highest standards of surgical care for patients. ... John Hunter (February 13, 1728 - October 16, 1793) was a Scottish surgeon regarded as one of the most distinguished scientists of his day. ... The Land Registry is responsible for maintaining a central register of land in the United Kingdom. ... A Greater London Council blue plaque at Alexandra Palace, commemorating the launch of BBC Television there in 1936. ...


The grassed area in the centre of the Fields contains a court for tennis and netball and a bandstand and is used for corporate events in the summer. Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... Originally known as womens basketball and adapted from basketball in the USA, netball, while basically unknown in its homeland, is the preeminent womens team sport (both as a spectator and participant sport) in Australia and New Zealand and is popular in United Kingdom, Jamaica, South Africa, and other...


There was a theatre in the Fields from 1661 to 1848, originally the Duke's Theatre, replaced by the New Theatre in 1705. For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... Events January 6 - The fifth monarchy men unsuccessfully attempt to seize control of London. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ...


Lincoln's Inn Fields was the site, in 1683, of the public beheading of Lord William Russell, son of the First Duke of Bedford, following his implication in the Rye House Plot for the assassination of King Charles II. The executioner was Jack Ketch who made such a poor job of it that four axe blows were required before the head was separated from the body and, after the first stroke, Russell looked up and said to him "You dog, did I give you 10 guineas to use me so inhumanely?". Lord William Russell (September 29, 1639 - 1683), was an English politician. ... The Rye House Plot of 1683 was a plan to assassinate King Charles II of England and his brother (and heir to the throne) James, Duke of York. ... The name Charles II is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles the Fat (also known as Charles II of France and Charles III of the Holy Roman Empire) Charles II of England Charles II of Naples Charles II of Navarre Charles II of Romania Charles II... Jack Ketch is a proverbial name for death or, sometimes, Satan, but it has its origins in an historical person. ...


When originally laid out, Lincoln's Inn Fields was part of fashionable London. The oldest building from this period is Lindsey House, 59-60 Lincoln's Inn Fields, which was built in 1640 and has been attributed to Inigo Jones. It derives its name from a period of ownership in the 18th century by the Earls of Lindsey. Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573 - June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ...


Another seventeenth century survival is now 66 Lincoln's Inn Fields, which was built for Lord Powis and known as Powis House. The charter of the Bank of England was sealed there on 27 July 1694. It was in 1705 acquired by the Duke of Newcastle (whereupon it became known as Newcastle House) who had it remodelled by Sir John Vanbrugh (following earlier work by Sir Christopher Wren after a fire in 1684). It remains substantially in its circa 1700 form although a remodelling in 1930 by Sir Edwin Lutyens gives it a curiously pastiche appearance. The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England Functions of the bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... Christopher Wren. ... Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens OM (March 29, 1869 - January 1, 1944), a British architect, designed many English country houses and was instrumental in the layout and building of New Delhi. ...


As London fashion moved west, Lincoln's Inn Fields was left to rich lawyers who were held there by its proximity to the Inns of Court. Thus, the former Newcastle House became in 1790 the premises of the solicitors Farrer & Co who are still there: their clients include much of the landed gentry and also Queen Elizabeth II. The Inns of Court, in London, are where barristers train and practice. ... Landed property or landed estates is a real estate term that usually refers to a property that generates income for the owner without himself having to do the actual work at the estate. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The...


In Charles Dickens' novel Bleak House, the sinister solicitor to the aristocracy Mr Tulkinghorn has his offices in Lincoln's Inn Fields, and one of its most dramatic scenes is set there. The description of his building corresponds most closely to Lindsey House. Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction. ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ...


From 1750-1992, the solicitors Frere Cholmeley were in premises on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields, after which their buildings were taken over by a leading set of commercial barristers' chambers, known as Essex Court Chambers after their own former premises at 4 Essex Court in the Temple. Essex Court Chambers now occupy five buildings between 24-28 Lincoln's Inn Fields. Other barristers' chambers have since then also set up in Lincoln's Inn Fields, although solicitors' firms still outnumber them there. British barristers wearing traditional dress. ... The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ...

  • Further reading: The Romance of Lincoln's Inn Fields (1932) Edwin Beresford Chancellor

 
 

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