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Encyclopedia > Limoges
Commune of Limoges
Bridge Saint-Étienne over the Vienne River in Limoges
Location
Coordinates 45°49′09″N, 01°15′05″E
Administration
Country France
Region Limousin (capital)
Department Haute-Vienne
(préfecture)
Arrondissement Limoges
Canton Chief town of 16 cantons
Intercommunality Limoges Métropole
Mayor Alain Rodet
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Altitude 209 m–431 m
(avg. 294 m)
Land area¹ 77.45 km²
Population²
(1999)
133,968
 - Density (1999) 1,730/km²
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 87085/ 87000
¹ French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
² Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Limoges (Lemòtges / Limòtges in Occitan) is a city and commune in France, the préfecture of the Haute-Vienne département, and the administrative capital of the Limousin région. Population city: 137,502 (limougeauds), urban area: 247,944. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2298x1529, 217 KB) Beschreibung Limoges, bridge Saint Etienne Limoges, pond Saint Etienne Limoges, Brücke Saint Etienne picture by user:Traumrune Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Download high resolution version (1804x1689, 163 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Limoges Categories: GFDL images ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including independent states (both those that are internationally recognised and generally unrecognised), inhabited dependent territories and areas of special sovereignty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Limoges Land area¹ 16,942 km² Regional President Jean-Paul Denanot (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Departments (French: départements) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Haute-Vienne is a French département named after the Vienne River. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... The 100 French départements are divided into 342 arrondissements. ... The arrondissement of Limoges is an arrondissement of France, located in the Haute-Vienne département, in the Limousin région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea[1]. Estuaries are often associated with high rates of... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Limoges, Ontario is a small community in The Nation, Ontario, Canada. ... Occitan, known also as Lenga dòc or Langue doc (Occitan: occitan, lenga dòc) is a Romance language spoken in Occitania (i. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... Haute-Vienne is a French département named after the Vienne River. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Capital Limoges Land area¹ 16,942 km² Regional President Jean-Paul Denanot (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common...


Limoges is known worldwide for its medieval enamels ('Limoges enamels') on copper, for its 19th century porcelain ('Limoges porcelain') and for its oak barrels (Limousin oak), which are used for Cognac production. In a discussion of art technology, enamel (or vitreous enamel, or porcelain enamel in American English) is the colorful result of fusion of powdered glass to a substrate through the process of firing, usually between 750 and 850 degrees Celsius. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic pinkish red Standard atomic weight 63. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... The manufactory of hard-paste Limoges porcelain was established by Turgot in 1771 and placed under the patronage of the comte dArtois, brother of Louis XVI. Limoges had been the site of a minor industry producing plain faience earthenwares since the 1730s, but the first identified French source of... This does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

For the ecclesiastical history, see Bishopric of Limoges

The Bishopric of Limoges is a diocese comprising the départments of Haute-Vienne and Creuse in France. ...

Ancient and medieval history

Very scarce remains of pre-urban settlements have been found in the area of Limoges. The capital of the Gaulish people of the Lemovices, who lived in the area, was probably situated some kilometers south-east of Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat. Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Lemovices (Lemovici) were a Gaulish tribe of Central Europe who established themselves in Limousin and Poitou between 700 and 400 BC. Their capital was Durotincum (Villejoubert) and in the era of Roman occupation, it was Augustoritum (Limoges). ... Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat is a village and commune of the Haute-Vienne département, in the Limousin région of France. ...


The city proper was founded as Augustoritum by the Romans, around the year 10 BC. The foundation was part of the reorganization of the province by the emperor Augustus, whence the new name. The Roman city included an amphitheater measuring 136 x 115 meters, a theater, a forum, baths and several sanctuaries. According to the tradition, a temple conscreated to Venus, Diana, Minerva and Jupiter was located near the modern cathedral. The city was on the typical Roman square plan, with two main streets crossing in the centre. It had a Senate and a currency of its own, a sign of its importance in the imperial age. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC 7 BC 6 BC 5 BC... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the virgin goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was thought to be the god of horror and fear. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Minerva was a Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ...


Limoges was evangelized by Saint Martial, who came in the city around 250 with two companions, Alpinianus and Austriclinienus. However, in the late 3rd century it was increasingly abandoned, due to the unsafe conditions created by the German invasions. The population concentrated instead on a more easily fortifiable site, the modern Puy Saint-Étienne, which is the centre of the modern Limoges. Starting from the construction of the Abbey of St. Martial (9th century), another settlement grew around the tomb of the saint, while a third area, next to the residence of the viscount (the future Castle of Saint Martial), seems to have been populated from the 10th century. Saint Martial was the first bishop of Limoges, in todays France , according to a life of Saturninus, first bishop of Toulouse, which Gregory of Tours quotes in his Life That is all that is known and it may be summed up thus: Under the Emperor Decius and of Gratus... The Abbey of St. ... Between Limoges, Brive and Périgueux, the viscounts of Limoges, also called viscounts of Ségur created a small principality, whose last heir was Henry IV. Ségur was the main home of these viscounts, in the heart of their domain. ...


Starting from the 11th century, thanks to the presence of the Abbey of St. Martial and its large library, Limoges became a flourishing artistic centre. It also was the home to an important school of medieval music composition, which is usually called the St. Martial School; its most famous member was the 13th century troubadour Bertran de Born. The Abbey of St. ... The St. ... A troubadour composing lyrics, Germany c. ... Bertran de Born (c. ...


In the 13th century, at the peak of its splendour, central Limoges was constituted by two different fortified settlements.

  • The town proper, with a new line of walls encompassing the Vienne river, inhabited mainly by clerks and the connected workers. It has a bridge entitled to Saint-Étienne, built by the bishops, and a developed port. Sacked in 1370, it never recovered entirely.
  • The castle, with 12 m-high walls, including the abbey and controlled by the abbot, sometimes in contrast with the bishop-ruled town. Traces of the walls can still be seen in the city's centre.

Outside of the formers' lines of walls were the popular quarters. The Vienne River is a river in France. ...


In 1370, Limoges was occupied by Edward, the Black Prince, the heir to the English throne, who massacred some 3,000 residents. Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, KG (June 15, 1330 – June 8, 1376), popularly known as the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, and father to King Richard II of England. ...


Modern history

The City and the Castle were united in 1792 to form a single city under the name of Limoges. During the French Revolution several religious edifices, considered symbols of the Ancient Regime, were destroyed by the population: these included the Abbey of St. Martial itself. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


Some years later the porcelain industry started to develop, favoured by the presence of kaolinite in the area. Much of the inhabitants became employed in the new sector or in the connected activities (including the lumbering of wood needed for the cooking of the porcelain). Kaolin Kaolinite (Aluminium Silicate Hydroxide) Kaolinite is a clay mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4. ...


In the 19th century Limoges saw a strong construction activity, which however included the destruction and rebuilding of much of the city's centre, regarded as unhealthy because of local chicken eating contests and as a nest of prostitution. The unsafe conditions of the poorer population is highlighted by the outbreak of several riots, including that of July-November 1830, of the April 1848 and the early 1905. The first French confederation of workers, Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT), was created in Limoges in 1895. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT or General Confederation of Work) is one of the five major French confederations of trade unions. ...

The Cathedral of Limoges.
The Cathedral of Limoges.
Bridge of Saint Martial.
Bridge of Saint Martial.
Gare des Bénédictins.
Gare des Bénédictins.


l337 F00l5 KR3W; =] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) © Roby File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Limoges ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) © Roby File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Limoges ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 555 pixelsFull resolution (2220 × 1541 pixel, file size: 273 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Limoges, bridge Saint Martial Limoges, pont Saint Martial Limoges, Brücke Saint Martial picture by user:Traumrune File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 555 pixelsFull resolution (2220 × 1541 pixel, file size: 273 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Limoges, bridge Saint Martial Limoges, pont Saint Martial Limoges, Brücke Saint Martial picture by user:Traumrune File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


Main sights

  • The Crypt of Saint Martial (10th century), including the tomb of the bishop which evangelized the city. It was discovered in the 1960s.
  • Remains of the Gallo-Roman amphitheater, one of the largest in the ancient Gaul. It was covered with earth in the 1960s.
  • The Gothic cathedral of St-Etienne, begun in 1273 and finished only in 1888. It is noted for a fine rood loft built in 1534 and for the fine, partly octagonal bell tower. The main artistic work are a Renaissance rood screen and the tomb of the bishop Jean de Langeac, with sculpted scenes of the Apocalypse.
  • The Chapelle Saint-Aurélien (14th-17th centuries). It includes the relics of St. Aurelian, the second bishop of Limoges and has medieval statues and Baroque piece of arts.
  • The church of St-Pierre-du-Queyroix, begun in the 12th century
  • St-Michel-des-Lions, begun in 1364. It houses the relics of St. Martial and has noteworthy stained-glass windows from the 15th-16th century. The most striking feature is the 65 m-high tower, with a spire surmounted by a big bronze ball.
  • The bridges of Saint Martial (dating from the Roman era) and of St-Etienne (13th century).
  • The Bishops' Palace (Palais de l'Évêché, 17th century). Of the original building, only a chapel remain. It is the seat of the Musée de l'Émail, with a large collection of old enamels. [Palace Exterior:[1]
  • The modern Gare des Bénédictins, inaugurated in 1929.
  • The Château de La Borie (17th century), at 4 km from the city. It is home to the Centre Culturel de Rencontre de La Borie et l'Ensemble Baroque de Limoges.
  • The remains of the 12th century Castle of Chalucet, 10 km outside the city. During the Hundred Years War it was a base of the bands of pillagers which ravaged the country.

Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The rood screen (also choir screen or chancel screen) is a common feature in late medieval church architecture, dividing the chancel from the nave. ... This article is in need of attention. ...

Porcelain

In 1771 kaolin, a rock rich in fine, white clay which is used for making porcelain, was discovered at Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, near Limoges. 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Kaolin Kaolinite (Aluminium Silicate Hydroxide) Kaolinite is a mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche is a commune of the Haute-Vienne département in France. ...


Under the impetus of the progressive economist Anne Robert Jacques Turgot, Baron de Laune, who had been appointed intendant of this impoverished and isolated region, a new ceramics industry was developed, and Limoges porcelain became famous during the 19th century. However, Limoges porcelain is a generic term for porcelain produced in Limoges rather than at a specific factory Anne-Robert-Jacques Turgot, Baron de Laune, often referred to as Turgot (10 May 1727 – 18 March 1781), was a French economist and statesman. ... Ancient Egyptian ceramic art: Louvre Museum. ... The manufactory of hard-paste Limoges porcelain was established by Turgot in 1771 and placed under the patronage of the comte dArtois, brother of Louis XVI. Limoges had been the site of a minor industry producing plain faience earthenwares since the 1730s, but the first identified French source of... The manufactory of hard-paste Limoges porcelain was established by Turgot in 1771 and placed under the patronage of the comte dArtois, brother of Louis XVI. Limoges had been the site of a minor industry producing plain faience earthenwares since the 1730s, but the first identified French source of...


Miscellaneous

Mussorgsky in 1874 Pictures at an Exhibition (Russian: , Kartínki s výstavki – Vospominániye o Víktore Gártmane, Pictures from an Exhibition – a Remembrance of Viktor Hartmann) is a famous suite of ten piano pieces composed by Modest Mussorgsky in 1874. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... USA Limoges is a French rugby union club currently competing in Pro D2 of the Ligue Nationale de Rugby. ... A rugby union scrum. ...

Births

Limoges was the birthplace of:

Jean Daurat (or Dorat) (Latin, Auratus), (1508 - November 1, 1588) was a French poet and scholar, a member of the Pléiade. ... 1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1588 was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The Pléiade was a group of 16th-century French poets whose principal members were Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay and Jean-Antoine de Baïf. ... Henri François dAguesseau. ... 1668 (MDCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... This page is a list of French justice ministers. ... Pierre Victurnien Vergniaud (May 31, 1753 - October 31, 1793) was a French orator and revolutionary. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Jean-Baptiste Jourdan Jean-Baptiste, comte Jourdan (April 29, 1762 – November 23, 1833), was a marshal of France. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... Stephen Grellet (November 2, 1773 – November 16, 1855) was a French prominent Quaker missionary. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... Thomas Robert Bugeaud de la Piconnerie, Duke of Isly (October 15, 1784 - June 10, 1849), was a marshal of France. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... Jean-Baptiste Joseph Émile Montégut (June 14, 1825 - December 11, 1895), was a French critic. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Marie François Sadi-Carnot, President of France Marie François Sadi Carnot (August 11, 1837 - June 24, 1894) was a French statesman, the fourth president of the third French Republic. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841–December 3, 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Maryse Bastié. Maryse Bastié (February 27, 1898 - July 6, 1952) was a French aviatrix. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... A shrewd, cunning little warrior; all perilous missions are immediately entrusted to him. ...

Twin towns

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Charlotte. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... South part of the city, seen from the Alte Veste (Zirndorf), 2004 The city of Fürth is located in northern Bavaria, Germany in the district of Middle Franconia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Hrodna (or Grodno; Belarusian: Го́радня, Гро́дна; Grodno in Polish, Гродно in Russian, Gardinas in Lithuanian) is a city in Belarus on the Nemunas river, close to the borders of Poland and Lithuania... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada. ... Limoges, Ontario is a small community in The Nation, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 4th... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic_(bordered). ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_(bordered). ... Seto (瀬戸市; -shi) is a city located in Aichi, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ...

See also

The Bishopric of Limoges is a diocese comprising the départments of Haute-Vienne and Creuse in France. ... Saint-Benoît-du-Sault is a little town and commune of the Indre département, in central France. ...

Sources and External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Limoges Hotel - Guide of Hotels in Limoges, France. (601 words)
Limoges (Limòtges in Occitan) is a city and commune in France, the préfecture of the Haute-Vienne département, and the administrative capital of the Limousin région.
Limoges is known worldwide for its medieval enamels ('Limoges enamels') on copper, for its 19th century porcelain ('Limoges porcelain') and for its oak barrels (Limousin oak), which are used for Cognac production.
Limoges was a center of the maquis resistance to the Vichy puppet government of the Nazis.
Limoges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1228 words)
Limoges (Lemòtges / Limòtges in Occitan) is a city and commune in France, the préfecture of the Haute-Vienne département, and the administrative capital of the Limousin région.
Limoges is known worldwide for its medieval enamels ('Limoges enamels') on copper, for its 19th century porcelain ('Limoges porcelain') and for its oak barrels (Limousin oak), which are used for Cognac production.
The unsafe conditions of the poorer population is highlighted by the outbreak of several riots, including that of July-November 1830, of the April 1848 and the early 1905.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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