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Encyclopedia > Limited series

The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. A limited series differs from an ongoing series in that the number of intended issues is determined before production of the series, and differs from a one shot in that it is comprised of multiple issues. It is still different from a finite series in that the number of issues is pre-determined while the latter has no definite number of issues set which could run for a number of years before it ends. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The term is often used interchangeably with “miniseries (mini-series)” and “maxiseries (maxi-series)”, often depending on the length and number of issues. In Dark Horse Comics’ definition of a limited series, “This term primarily applies to a connected series of individual comic books. A limited series refers to a comic book series with a clear beginning, middle and end. Limited series may also be referred to as mini-series (less than twelve individual issues) or maxi-series (twelve or more individual issues).” [1] DC Comics refers to limited series of two to eight issues long as miniseries while nine to twelve issues or longer as maxiseries while Marvel Comics originated the term limited series itself. Other publishers alternate terms calling such works as either limited series or miniseries while others still choose not to label at all. A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Dark Horse Comics is an American comic book publisher, one of the largest independent publishers behind dominant publishers Marvel Comics and DC Comics. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents


Characteristics

The limited series has a single specific story to tell. They follow the standard plot set up of beginning, middle and resolution. Usually, all plot points are covered by the end of the series. There have been limited series done in an anthology format but there have been only a few of these produced.


Limited series are often done by a single creative team but in cases where there are changes, it is usually the writer who remains constant throughout the run while the artist may change hands. The number of issues is usually determined by the writer’s plotting and also by editorial mandate.


History

The genesis of the limited series may be traced to anthology series and back up stories in series featuring the title character. Publishers would often experiment with new characters and stories. If proven popular, these characters were quickly spun off to their own titles. This was particular of comics during the 1960s and through the 1970s which saw a boom in sales of comics. This was often done despite uncertainty whether a character or team could carry on a series more than a few issues. An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


Nowhere is this more seen than in DC Comics which released continuously released a slew of titles between 1975 and 1978, reaching close to 60 monthly ongoing titles. Eventually, DC was forced to scale back and cancel more than one half of its titles. (see DC Implosion) Aside from suffering financially, DC Comics was also criticized for straining itself creatively and editorially, affecting the quality of their comics. The DC Implosion is the informal yet established name by which fans and other observers refer to the dramatic number of sudden cancellations among DC Comics publications in 1978. ...

After recovering from the implosion of its titles, DC Comics decided to experiment with a new format to tell stories. The result was the 1979 World of Krypton miniseries, as DC Comics calls such short run works. The new format allowed them to tell stories that may not fit in to an ongoing series and to showcase characters into a short story without the risk and obligations of an ongoing monthly. It also freed creators to tell a longer story without the confines characteristic of a backup story. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (400x620, 107 KB) Summary Author: DC Comics Licensing This image is of the cover of a single issue of a comic book, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the comic book or the...

With the success of the miniseries format, DC Comics followed by experimenting with longer stories and concepts that are outside of their universe of superheroes. First began in 1982, Camelot 3000 was the first limited series to run to twelve issues and be dubbed as a maxiseries. It was printed on Baxter paper stock and sold through direct market stores. DC Comics followed it with another important contribution to the concept with a new book format. Ronin was printed on glossy paper stock and introduced the Prestige Format. The Prestige Format (or bookshelf format as called by other publishers) is packaged within a cardstock cover and square bound with more pages than the conventional magazine pamphlet and no advertisements. [2] Without the advertisements, it resulted in a different pacing in comic storytelling. The Prestige Format is not favored by other publishers and DC Comics is the only one that almost exclusively continues to use it. Image File history File links Secretwars1. ... Camelot 3000 is a comic book maxi-series written by Mike Barr and penciled by Brian Bolland and published by DC Comics from 1982-1985 as one of its first Direct Market projects. ... Ronin Book One Ronin is a graphic novel by Frank Miller in which a ronin is re-incarnated in a dystopic near-future New York. ...


It did not take long for other publishers to follow the limited series form. Marvel Comics used it to feature popular characters from team titles and put them in a lengthy solo adventure. Wolverine’s earliest solo adventures were told in limited series. Crossovers between two characters or teams presented as major storylines were also in limited series form before the concept of crossover stories jumping from one title to another was conceived. Contest of Champions brought forth the idea of a major event affecting the Marvel Universe, this would be taken further with the twelve-issue Secret Wars saga in 1984 and by DC Comics’ Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985. Wolverine (born James Howlett, aka Logan) is a Marvel Comics superhero and member of the X-Men. ... Contest of Champions is a 1982 mini-series by Marvel Comics. ... Secret Wars (full title Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars) is the name of a twelve-issue Marvel Comics comic book limited series produced between 1984 and 1985, and a Mattel toy line that reflected the series. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a twelve-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


Majority of Dark Horse’s comics are released in limited series form. Their contribution would be the idea of a series of limited series. Each limited series told a complete story to be followed by another one that builds its story from the previous one. This provided an avenue for creator-owned works where the uncertainty of investing the creator’s property in an ongoing series is lifted from the creator’s concern. The owning creator could complete a limited series installment and follow it with another when they can. This is a model other publishers would use.


Since then, the limited series made it possible for creators to tell graphic novel length stories. Releasing the story in monthly installments enabled them to immediately receive returns on investment. Further returns are possible with trade paperback collections of the series. A graphic novel (GN) is a long-form comic book, usually with lengthy and complex storylines, and often aimed at more mature audiences. ...


Lengths of limited series

Four to six issues is still the norm for most limited series and presents as the most reasonable investment for comic publishers though there are series that run for as short as two or three issues. Twelve-issue maxiseries form was popular in the 1980s. Many memorable series ran in this length such as Secret Wars, Crisis on Infinite Earths, Watchmen, and Squadron Supreme. This form almost faded out in the 1990s. One point that went against it was the greater financial risk in investing in a lengthy limited series. The popularity of the maxiseries length was resurrected by DC Comics with the success of Batman: The Long Halloween and followed by The Kents. Watchmen is a twelve-issue comic book written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... The Kents is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics. ...


Stories of greater length, those running to more than twelve chapters, were often done in multi-title crossovers. But the 1995 Marvel Comics event, Age of Apocalypse, involved several limited series that replaced the ongoing X-Men related titles for four months and bookended by two one-shot specials. This idea is revisited by Grant Morrison in 2005 with the Seven Soldiers of Victory project and which he dubbed as a “mega-series”. [3] Marking the difference between the two, Age of Apocalypse was produced by several writers while Seven Soldiers is the most ambitious undertaking so far by a single writer. The Age of Apocalypse was a comic book storyline. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a comic book writer and artist. ... The Seven Soldiers of Victory (also known as Laws Legionaires) is a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ...


The current DC Comics project, 52, is set to be the longest run limited series. It will compose of 52 issues. Interestingly, DC has not labeled it as either maxiseries or miniseries, preferring to call it simply a series. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series to be published by DC Comics, to debut May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


As a rule, the number of issues a limited series will run is determined from the outset. However, there are cases where this rule is changed. Two reasons stands for this, one is often commercial while the second is, to a rarer extent, creative. Dark Horse’s 1993 Aliens: Colonial Marines was originally to have a run of twelve issues. When the sales of Colonial Marines faltered midway through the run, the series was shortened to ten issues. Marvel’s Fantastic Four: Big Town was set to run six issues only to be set back to four issues. Number changing does not always result in reduction of issues. The first Gen 13 was to run four issues with the fourth a double-sized finale. Instead, the final issue was split to two in order to meet publishing schedule. Brian Michael Bendis found difficulty in resolving the finale of Ultimate Six and Marvel granted his request of extending the series from six to seven issues. The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Gen 13 #6 cover by Jim Lee Gen 13 is a comic book originally written by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi and illustrated by J. Scott Campbell. ... Brian Michael Bendis. ... Ultimate Six is a seven-issue miniseries and fictional crossover between Spider-Man and the Ultimates. ...


Notable limited series

Camelot 3000 is a comic book maxi-series written by Mike Barr and penciled by Brian Bolland and published by DC Comics from 1982-1985 as one of its first Direct Market projects. ... Ronin Book One Ronin is a graphic novel by Frank Miller in which a ronin is re-incarnated in a dystopic near-future New York. ... Contest of Champions is a 1982 mini-series by Marvel Comics. ... Secret Wars (full title Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars) is the name of a twelve-issue Marvel Comics comic book limited series produced between 1984 and 1985, and a Mattel toy line that reflected the series. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a twelve-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Watchmen is a twelve-issue comic book written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series to be published by DC Comics, to debut May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...

References

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
limited series: Information from Answers.com (1493 words)
A limited series differs from an ongoing series in that the number of intended issues is determined before production of the series, and differs from a one shot in that it is comprised of multiple issues.
Limited series may also be referred to as mini-series (less than twelve individual issues) or maxi-series (twelve or more individual issues)." [1] DC Comics refers to limited series of two to eight issues long as miniseries while nine to twelve issues or longer as maxiseries while Marvel Comics originated the term limited series itself.
Limited series are often done by a single creative team but in cases where there are changes, it is usually the writer who remains constant throughout the run while the artist may change hands.
Delaware Series LLC Provisions (859 words)
The termination of a series established in accordance with subsection (b) of this section shall not affect the limitation on liabilities of such series provided by subsection (b) of this section.
The persons winding up the affairs of a series may, in the name of the limited liability company and for and on behalf of the limited liability company and such series, take all actions with respect to the series as are permitted under § 18-803(b) of this title.
The persons winding up the affairs of a series shall provide for the claims and obligations of the series and distribute the assets of the series as provided in § 18-804 of this title, which section shall apply to the winding up and distribution of assets of a series.
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