FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Lille" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lille

Coordinates: 50°37′57″N, 03°03′30″E Lille is a city in France: Lille Lille is also a municipality in Belgium: Lille, Belgium See also: Alain de Lille, Ecole Centrale de Lille This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Ville de Lille
Flag of Lille
New city flag Traditional coat of arms
Motto: –
Location
Map highlighting the commune of Lille
Coordinates 50°37′57″N, 03°03′30″E
Time Zone CET (GMT +1)
Administration
Country Flag of France France
Region Nord-Pas de Calais
Department Nord (59)
Intercommunality Urban Community of
Lille Métropole
Mayor Martine Aubry  (PS)
(since 2001)
City Statistics
Land area¹ 39.51 [1] km²
Population² 10th in France
 - 2004 estimate 226.800 [1]
 - Density 5.740/km² (2004[1])
Urban Spread
Urban Area 450 km² (1999[2])
 - Population 1.000.900 (1999[3])
Metro Area 975 km² (1999[2])
 - Population 1.143.125 (1999[4])
¹ French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
² Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Lille (Dutch: Rijsel) is the main city of France's fourth largest metropolitan area (consisting of Lille, Roubaix, Tourcoing and their suburbs). It is located to the country's north, on the Deûle River, near the border with Belgium. It is the capital of the Nord-Pas de Calais region and the préfecture (capital) of the Nord department. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Paris_plan_pointer_b_jms. ... Image File history File links France_jms. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Nord Pas-de-Calais Arrondissements 13 Cantons 156 Communes 1,546 Statistics Land area1 12,414 km² Population (Ranked 4th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Extent of Flemish in the Arrondissement of Dunkirk, 1874 and 1972 Nord (French: North) is a département in the north of France. ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... Founded December 22, 1967 President Pierre Mauroy (PS) (since 1989) Communes 85 Area 611. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Martine Aubry (maiden name Delors), born on August 8th, 1950 in Paris is a French politician. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is one of the largest political parties in France. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... In France an unité urbaine (literally: urban unit) is a statistical area defined by INSEE, the French national statistics office, for the measurement of contiguously built-up areas. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... In France an aire urbaine (literally: urban area) is roughly the equivalent of a US Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location within France Roubaix is a city of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Tourcoing and the Belgian border. ... Tourcoing (Dutch: ) is a city and commune of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Roubaix and the Belgian border. ... Deûle is a river of northern France which is currently channeled for the main part of its course (from Lens to Lille ). The upstream part is still partly free-flowing and is known as the Souchez. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Nord Pas-de-Calais Arrondissements 13 Cantons 156 Communes 1,546 Statistics Land area1 12,414 km² Population (Ranked 4th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... Extent of Flemish in the Arrondissement of Dunkirk, 1874 and 1972 Nord (French: North) is a département in the north of France. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ...


The city of Lille absorbed Lomme on February 27, 2000. Their combined population at the 2005 census was 226,800 inhabitants. The whole metropolitan area of Lille, both on French and Belgian territory (Kortrijk, Tournai) was estimated in 2007 at around 1,885,000 inhabitants, ranking as one of the major metropolitan areas of Europe. Overview Lomme is a city in northern France, which was absorbed by Lille in 2000. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Kortrijk Coordinates , , Area 80. ... Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik in Latin: Tornacum) is a municipality located 85 kilometres southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt (in French: Escaut, in Dutch: Schelde), in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ...

Contents

History

Origin of the city

The legend of "Lyderic and Phinaert" puts the foundation of the city of "L'Isle" at 640. Although the first mention of the town appears in archives from the year 1066, some archeological digs seem to show the area as inhabited by as early as 2000 BC, most notably in the modern-day quartiers of Fives, Wazemmes, and Old Lille. The legend of Lyderic and Phinaert is tied to the foundation of the French city of Lille. ...


The name Lille comes from insula or l'Isla, since the area was at one time marshy. This name was used for the Count of Flanders' castle (Château du Buc), built on dry land in the middle of the marsh. The Count of Flanders controlled a number of old Roman cities (Boulogne, Arras, Cambrai) as well as some founded by the Carolingians (Valenciennes, Saint-Omer, Ghent, Bruges, Antwerp). The County of Flanders thus extended to the left bank of the Scheldt, one of the richest and most properous regions of Europe. The original inhabitants of this region were the Celts, who were followed by the Menapians, the Morins, the Atrébates, and the Vervians, Germanic tribes. From 830 until around 910, the Vikings invaded Flanders. After the destruction caused by Norman and Hungarian invasion, the eastern part of the region fell under the eyes of the area princes. It is in this context that the city was created. The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Cambrai (Dutch: Kamerijk) is a French city and commune, in the Nord département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Valenciennes (Dutch: Valencijn, Latin: Valentianae) is a town and commune in northern France in the Nord département on the Escaut river. ... Saint-Omer, a town and commune of Artois in northern France, sous-préfecture of the Pas-de-Calais département, 42 miles west-north-west of Lille on the railway to Calais. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province East Flanders Arrondissement Ghent Coordinates , , Area 156. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Flanders (or a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules). ... The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut) is a 350 km[1] long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), refers primarily to the members of any of a number of peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages, a branch of Indo-European languages, or descended from those who did. ... The Atrebates (meaning settlers) were an Iron Age tribe of Gaul and Britain before the Roman conquests. ... The term Germanic tribes (or Teutonic tribes) applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Norman conquests in red. ...


Middle ages

A local notable in this period was Evrard, who lived in the 9th century and participated in many of the day's political and military affairs. Saint Evrard was a soldier in the court of Charlemagne--he also served as a diplomat to the Turks. ...


From the 12th century, the fame of the Lille cloth fair began to grow. In 1144 Saint Sauveur parish was formed, which would give its name to the modern-day quartier Saint-Sauveur.


The counts of Flanders, Boulogne, and Hainaut came together with England and the Holy Roman Empire of Germany and declared war on France and King Philippe Auguste, a war that ended with the French victory at Bouvines in 1214. Count Ferrand of Portugal was imprisoned and the county fell into dispute: it would be his wife, Jeanne, Countess of Flanders and Constantinople, who ruled the city. They say she was well-loved by the residents of Lille, who by that time numbered 10,000. The virtually independent county of Hainaut emerged from chaotic conditions at the end of the 9th century as a semi-independent state, at first a vassal of the crown of Lotharingia. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Bouvines is a commune of the Nord département, in northern France. ... Ferdinand, prince of Portugal (Port. ... Jeanne of Flanders (1199/1200 - 1244) was countess of Flanders and Hainaut. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ...


In 1224, the monk Bertrand of Rains, doubtlessly encouraged by local lords, tried to pass himself off as Baldwin I of Constantinople (the father of Jeanne of Flanders), who had disappeared at the battle of Adrianople. He pushed the kingdoms of Flanders and Hainaut towards sedition against Jeanne in order to recover his land. She called her cousin, Louis VIII ("The Lion"). He unmasked the imposter, whom Countess Jeanne quickly had hanged. In 1226 the King agreed to free Ferrand of Portugal. Count Ferrand died in 1233, and his daughter Marie soon after. In 1235, Jeanne granted a city charter by which city governors would be chosen each All Saint's Day by four commissioners chosen by the ruler. On February 6th, 1236, she founded the Countess's Hospital (L'hospice de la comtesse), which remains one of the most beautiful buildings in Old Lille. It was in her honor that the hospital of the Regional Medical University of Lille was named "Jeanne of Flanders Hospital" in the 20th century. Baldwin I (July 1172 – 1205, Bulgaria), the first emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople, as Baldwin IX Count of Flanders and as Baldwin VI Count of Hainaut, was one of the most prominent leaders of the Fourth Crusade, which resulted in the capture of Constantinople, the conquest of the... This Battle of Adrianople occurred on April 14, 1205 between Bulgarians under Tsar Kaloyan of Bulgaria, and Crusaders under Baldwin I. It was won by the Bulgarians after a skillful ambush. ... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Ferdinand, prince of Portugal (Port. ...


The Countess died in 1244 in the Abbey of Marquette, leaving no heirs. The rule of Flanders and Hainaut thus fell to her sister, Marguerite of Flanders, then to Marguerite's brother, Guy de Dampierre. Lille fell under the rule of France from 1304 to 1369, after the battle of Mons-en-Pévèle. Margaret II of Flanders (1202-1278) was countess of Flanders from 1244 to 1278 and countess of Hainaut from 1244 to 1246. ... Guy of Dampierre (Dutch: Gwijde van Dampierre) was the count of Flanders during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. ... The Battle of Mons-en-Pévèle was fought on August 17, 1304 between the French and the Flemish. ...


The county of Flanders fell to the Duchy of Burgundy next, after the 1369 marriage of Marguerite de Male, Countess of Flanders, and Philippe II le Hardi, Duke of Burgundy. Lille thus became one of the three capitals of said Duchy, along with Brussels and Dijon. By 1445, Lille counted some 25,000 residents. Philippe le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, was even more powerful than the King of France, and made Lille an administrative and financial capital. The following is a list of the Dukes of Burgundy Richard of Autun, the Justicier (880–921) Rudolph of Burgundy (king of France from 923) (921–923) Hugh the Black (923–952) Gilbert of Chalon (952–956) Odo of Paris (956-965) Otto-Henry the Great... Margaret of Dampierre (1350–1405) was Countess of Flanders and twice Duchess of Burgundy. ... Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, known as the Bold (Philippe II de Bourgogne, le Hardi in French) (January 15, 1342 – April 27, 1404), was the fourth son of King John II of France and his wife, Bonne of Luxembourg. ... Cross of Burgundy Flag The Duchy of Burgundy, today Bourgogne, has its origin in the small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians west of river Saône which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Balds kingdom of West Franks. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Dijon ( , IPA: ) is a city in eastern France, the préfecture (administrative capital) of the Côte-dOr département and of the Bourgogne région. ... Philip III, Duke of Burgundy (Philip the Good or Philippe le Bon) (July 31, 1396 – June 15, 1467) was Duke of Burgundy from 1419 until his death. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ...


On February 17, 1454, one year after the taking of Constantinople by the Turks, Philippe le Bon organised a Patagruelian banquet at his Lille palace, the still-celebrated "Feast of the Pheasant". There the Duke and his court undertook an oath to Christianity. is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 4 - In the Thirteen Years War, the Secret Council of the Prussian Confederacy sends a formal act of disobedience to the Grand Master. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †,[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 7,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] 10,000 civilian dead[5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of... Philip III, Duke of Burgundy (Philip the Good or Philippe le Bon) (July 31, 1396 – June 15, 1467) was Duke of Burgundy from 1419 until his death. ... Pantagruel is an international Early Music ensemble specialising in semi-staged performances of Renaissance music. ... The Feast of the Pheasant (Banquet du Voeu) was a banquet given by Philip the Good of Burgundy in 1454 in Lille. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


In 1477, at the death of the last duke of Burgundy, Charles the Bold, Mary of Burgundy married a Hapsburg, Maximilian of Austria, who thus became Count of Flanders. At the end of the reign of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, Spanish Flanders fell to his eldest son, and thus under the rule of Philip II of Spain, King of Spain. The city remained under Spanish rule until the reign of Philip IV of Spain. Charles the Bold Charles, called the Bold (French: Charles le Téméraire) (November 10, 1433 – 1477) was Duke of Burgundy from 1467 to 1477. ... Mary of Burgundy. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Maximilian I of Habsburg (March 22, 1459 – January 12, 1519) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Philip II (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord... Philip IV (), (April 8, 1605 – September 17, 1665) was King of Spain from 1621 to 1665 and also King of Portugal until 1640. ...


The modern era

The façade of the 'Vieille Bourse' on the 'Grand Place'
The façade of the 'Vieille Bourse' on the 'Grand Place'
Place du Général de Gaulle, also known as 'Grand Place'
Place du Général de Gaulle, also known as 'Grand Place'

The 16th century was marked, above all, by the outbreak of the Plague, a boom in the regional textile industry, and the Protestant revolts. Download high resolution version (480x640, 92 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 92 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2771 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2771 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


The first Calvinists appeared in the area in 1542; by 1555 there was anti-Protestant repression taking place. In 1578, the Hurlus, a group of Protestant rebels, stormed the castle of the Counts of Mouscron. They were removed four months later by a Catholic Wallon regiment, after which they tried several times between 1581 and 1582 to take the city of Lille, all in vain. The Hurlus were notably held back by the legendary Jeanne Maillotte. At the same time (1581), at the call of England's Queen Elizabeth I , the north of the Spanish Netherlands, having gained a Protestant majority, successfully revolted and formed the United Provinces. In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Hainaut Arrondissement Mouscron Coordinates , , Area 40. ... The term Walloon may refer to either the Walloon language, or to the ethnic people of the same name. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ... This article or section should be merged with Seventeen Provinces The Spanish Netherlands was a portion of the Low Countries controlled by Spain from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. ... Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ...


In 1667, King Louis XIV (the Sun-King) successfully laid siege to Lille, resulting in it becoming French in 1668 under the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, provoking discontent among the citizens of the prosperous city. A number of important public works undertaken between 1667 and 1670, such as the Citadel (erected by Vauban), or the creation of the quartiers of Saint-André and la Madeleine, enabled the King to gain the confidence of his Flemish subjects. Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Combatants France Spain Commanders Louis XIV Vauban unknown The Siege of Lille was a siege of the city of Lille during the War of Devolution. ... There were two Treaties of Aix-la-Chapelle. ... Sébastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban and later Marquis de Vauban (May 15, 1633 - March 30, 1707), commonly referred to as Vauban, was a Marshal of France and the foremost military engineer of his age, famed for his skill in both designing fortifications and in breaking through them. ...

Entrance to the 'Vauban Citadel' (17th century)
Entrance to the 'Vauban Citadel' (17th century)

During five years, from 1708 to 1713, the city was occupied by the Dutch, during the War of the Spanish Succession. Throughout the 18th century, Lille remained profoundly Catholic, which explains why the city did not really take part in the French Revolution, though there were riots and the destruction of churches. In 1790, the city held their first municipal elections. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2900 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2900 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


After the French Revolution

In 1792, in the aftermath of the French Revolution, the Austrians, then in the United Provinces, laid siege to Lille. The "Column of the Goddess", erected in 1842 in the "Grand-Place" (officially named La Place du Général de Gaulle), is a tribute to the city's resistance, led by Mayor François André. Although Austrian artillery destroyed many houses and the main church of the city, the city did not surrender and the Austrian army left after eight days. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... The Column of the Goddess is the popular name given by the citizens of Lille (France) to the Memorial of the siege of 1792. ...

The black dots around the windows (not the decorative cartouches) are Austrian cannonballs lodged in the façade.
The black dots around the windows (not the decorative cartouches) are Austrian cannonballs lodged in the façade.

The city continued to grow, and by 1800 held some 53,000 residents, leading to Lille becoming the county seat of the Nord départment in 1804. In 1846, a rail line connecting Paris and Lille was built. Cannonballs appapently lodged in the façade of a building in Lille, France, are actually decorative cartouches. ... Cannonballs appapently lodged in the façade of a building in Lille, France, are actually decorative cartouches. ... Ancient egyptian cartouche of Thutmose III, Karnak, Egypt. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Extent of Flemish in the Arrondissement of Dunkirk, 1874 and 1972 Nord (French: North) is a département in the north of France. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to British counties. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


At the beginning of the 19th century, Napoleon I's continental blockade against the United Kingdom led to Lille's textile industry developing itself even more fully. The city was known for its cotton, and the nearby towns of Roubaix and Tourcoing worked wool. Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The Continental System was a foreign-policy cornerstone of Napoleon I of France in his struggle against the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland during the Napoleonic Wars. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Location within France Roubaix is a city of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Tourcoing and the Belgian border. ... Tourcoing (Dutch: ) is a city and commune of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Roubaix and the Belgian border. ... Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, Arizona Wool is the fiber derived from the fur of animals and people of the Caprinae family, principally sheep, but the hair of certain species of other mammals such as goats and rabbits and oxes...


In 1853, Alexandre Desrousseaux composed his famous lullaby Dors mon p'tit quinquin. In 1858, an imperial decree led to the annexation of the adjacent towns of Fives, Wazemmes, and Moulins. Lille's population was 158,000 in 1872, growing to over 200,000 by 1891. In 1896 Lille became the first city in France to be led by a socialist, Gustave Delory. Fives is a British sport believed to derive from the same origins as many racket sports. ... Moulins or Moulin (French for mill) is the name or part of the name of several communes in France. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ...


By 1912, Lille's population was at 217,000: the city profited from the Industrial Revolution, particularly via coal and the steam engine. The entire region had grown wealthy thanks to the mines and to the textile industry. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ...


World War I

From October 4th to 13th, 1914, the troops in Lille were able to trick the enemy by convincing them that Lille possessed more artillery than was the case; in reality, the city had only a single cannon. Despite the deception, the German bombardments destroyed over 2,200 buildings and homes. When the Germans realized they had been tricked, they burned down an entire section of town, subsequently occupying the city. Lille was liberated by the British on October 17th 1918, when General Sir William Birdwood and his troops were welcomed by joyous crowds. The general was made an honorary citizen of Lille on October 28th of that year. Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... Field Marshal William Riddell Birdwood, 1st Baron Birdwood GCB GCSI GCMG GCVO GBE CIE DSO (13 September 1865 – 17 May 1951) was a First World War general who is best known as the commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Battle of Gallipoli in 1915. ...


The Années Folles, the Great Depression, and the Popular Front

In July 1921, at the Pasteur Institute in Lille, Albert Calmette and Camille Guérin discovered the first antituberculosis vaccine, known as BCG ("Bacille de Calmette et Guérin"). The Pasteur Institute (French: Institut Pasteur) is a French non-profit private foundation dedicated to the study of biology, microorganisms, diseases and vaccines. ... Léon Charles Albert Calmette (July 12, 1863 – October 29, 1933) was a French physician, bacteriologist and immunologist, and an important officer of the Pasteur Institute. ... Jean-Marie Camille Guérin (b. ... Tuberculous lungs show up on an X-ray image Tuberculosis is an infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system (meningitis), lymphatic system, circulatory system (miliary TB), genitourinary system, bones and joints. ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to establish immunity to a disease. ...


From 1931 Lille felt the repercussions of the Great Depression, and by 1935 a third of the city's population lived in poverty. In 1936, the city's mayor, Roger Salengro, became Minister of the Interior of the Popular Front, eventually killing himself after right-wing groups led a slanderous campaign against him.


World War II

Lille was taken by the Germans in May 1940, after brief resistance by a Moroccan Infantry division. When Belgium was invaded, the citizens of Lille, still marked by the events of World War I, began to flee the city in large numbers. Although Lille was part of the zone under control of the German commander in Brussels, the city was never controlled by the Vichy government. The départments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais (with the exception of the coast, notably Dunkerque) were, for the most part, liberated in five days, from the 1st to 5th September 1944 by British, American, Canadian, and Polish troops. On September 3rd, the German troops began to leave Lille, fearing the British, who were on their way from Brussels. Following this, the Lille resistance managed to retake part of the city before the British tanks arrived. Rationing came to an end in 1947, and by 1948, some normality had returned to Lille. Vichy (Occitan: Vichèi) is a French commune, situated in the département of Allier and the région of Auvergne. ... Pas-de-Calais is a département in northern France named after the strait which it borders. ... Location within France Dunkirk ( French: Dunkerque; Dutch: Duinkerke) is a harbour city and a commune in the northernmost part of France, in the département of Nord, 10 km from the Belgian border. ...


Post-war to the present

In 1967, the Chambers of Commerce of Lille, Roubaix, and Tourcoing were joined, and in 1969, the Communauté urbaine de Lille (Lille urban community) was created, linking 87 communes with Lille. The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ...


Throughout the 1960s and 70s, the region was faced with some problems after the decline of the coal, mining and textile industries. From the start of the 1980s, the city began to turn itself more towards the service sector. The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ...


In 1983, the VAL, the world's first automated rapid transit underground network, was opened. In 1993, a high-speed TGV train line was opened, connecting Paris with Lille in one hour. This, followed by the opening of the Channel Tunnel in 1994 and the arrival of the Eurostar train, puts Lille in the centre of a triangle connecting Paris, London, and Brussels. One of the earliest examples of ATO was on the Victoria line of the London Underground, opened in 1968. The ATO system performs all functions of the driver except for the closing of the doors. The driver only needs to press two buttons to close the doors and if the way is clear, then the train will automatically proceed to the next station. Many newer systems are now computer-controlled, including London's Docklands Light Railway, the Central Line, Line 14 of the Paris Métro, Line 2 and 5 of the Barcelona's Underground, Hong Kong MTR, West Rail, Ma On Shan Rail and a number of ART- and VAL-based systems. Noooooo! Val may refer to: Aichi D3A dive bomber, known by Allied codename Val during World War II Valine, amino acid, abbreviation VAL, a type of unmanned light rubber-tired metro valley girl, short form A first name, on its own or short for Valerie, Valmond, etc. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... For the group of heart conditions referred to as TGV, see transposition of the great vessels. ... Map of the Channel Tunnel. ... A Eurostar on the CTRL going through the Medway Towns Eurostar is a train service connecting the UK with Paris (Gare du Nord), Lille and Brussels (Brussels South). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Work on Euralille, an urban remodelling project, began in 1991. The Euralille Centre was opened in 1994, and the remodeled district is now full of parks and modern buildings containing offices, shops, and apartments. In 1994 the "Grand Palais" was also opened.


Lille tried an unsuccessful bid for the organization of the Games of the XXVIIIth Olympiad in 2004. The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Economy

A former major textile manufacturing centre, Lille forms the heart of a larger conurbation, regrouping Lille, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Villeneuve d'Ascq, which is France's 4th-largest urban conglomeration with a 1999 population of over 1.1 million. For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Location within France Roubaix is a city of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Tourcoing and the Belgian border. ... Tourcoing (Dutch: ) is a city and commune of northern France, in the Nord département, located near the cities of Lille and Roubaix and the Belgian border. ... Saint-Pierre dAscq church Located between Lille and Roubaix, at the crossroads of the principal freeways towards Paris, Ghent, Antwerp and Brussels, Villeneuve dAscq (which means New city of Ascq in French) is one of the principal cities of the communauté urbaine Lille Métropole. ... This article is about the year. ...


Transport

Lille is an important crossroads in the European high-speed rail network: it lies on the Eurostar line to London and the French TGV network to Paris, Brussels and other major centres in France such as Marseille, Lyon, and Toulouse. It has two train stations, which stand next door to one another: Lille-Europe station (Gare Lille-Europe), which primarily serves high-speed trains and international services (Eurostar), and Lille-Flandres station (Gare Lille-Flandres), which primarily serves lower speed trains. French-designed Eurostar and Thalys TGVs side-by-side in the Paris-Gare du Nord. ... A Eurostar on the CTRL going through the Medway Towns Eurostar is a train service connecting the UK with Paris (Gare du Nord), Lille and Brussels (Brussels South). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the group of heart conditions referred to as TGV, see transposition of the great vessels. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


The Lille Metro's VAL system (véhicule automatique léger = light automated vehicle) is a driverless metro. It opened on May 16, 1983, becoming the first automatic metro line in the world. Line 2 is 32 km long with 43 stations. It was the longest in the world until August 31, 2002, when it was surpassed by the Vancouver SkyTrain. Trains are only 26 m long (two linked cars) and are rubber-tired. There are 60 stations which go as far as the Belgian border. Interior of a metro train in Lille Line map The Lille Metro (fr. ... Noooooo! Val may refer to: Aichi D3A dive bomber, known by Allied codename Val during World War II Valine, amino acid, abbreviation VAL, a type of unmanned light rubber-tired metro valley girl, short form A first name, on its own or short for Valerie, Valmond, etc. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The platform at Metrotown Station in Burnaby is one of the busiest in the SkyTrain system. ... Rubber-tyred metro is an intermediate form between rail and road transport: the vehicles have wheels with rubber tyres like a bus, but using a set of two parallel concrete (e. ...


Highways

Lille: motorway network.
Lille: motorway network.

No less than five autoroutes pass by Lille, the densest confluence of highways in France after Paris: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

  • Autoroute A27 : Lille - Tournai - Brussels / Liège - Germany
  • Autoroute A23 : Lille - Valenciennes
  • Autoroute A1  : Lille - Arras - Paris / Reims - Lyon / Orléans / Le Havre
  • Autoroute A25 : Lille - Dunkirk - Calais - England / North Belgium
  • Autoroute A22 : Lille - Antwerp - Netherlands

A sixth one — the proposed A24 — will link Amiens to Lille if built, but there is opposition to its route.


Air traffic

Lille Lesquin (http://www.lille.aeroport.fr/) International Airport is 15 minutes from the city centre. It is the 12th most frequented French airport in number of passengers:

  • around 970,000 passengers in 2001
  • almost 873,000 passengers in 2003

In terms of shipping, it ranks fourth, with almost 38,000 tonnes of freight which pass through each year.


Waterways

Lille is the 3rd largest French river port after Paris and Strasbourg. The river Deûle is connected to regional waterways with over 680 km of navigatable waters. The Deûle connects to Northern Europe via the River Scarpe and the River Escaut (towards Belgium and the Netherlands), and internationally via the Lys (to Dunkerque and Calais). For other uses, see Strasburg. ... Deûle is a river of northern France which is currently channeled for the main part of its course (from Lens to Lille ). The upstream part is still partly free-flowing and is known as the Souchez. ... The Scarpe is a river in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France. ... The Scheldt in Antwerp Length 350 km Elevation of the source 95 m Average discharge 120 m³/s Area watershed 21860 km² Origin France Mouth Westerschelde Basin countries France, Belgium, Netherlands The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French lEscaut) is a 350 km[1] (217 mile) long river that finds its... Lys, the French word for lily, could be any of the following: Geographical The Lys or Leie is a river originating in France, entering Belgium and flowing into the river Scheldt in Ghent. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


Shipping statistics

Year 1997 2000 2003
Millions of tonnes 5.56 6.68 7.30
By River or Sea 8.00% 8.25% 13.33%
By Rail 6.28% 4.13% 2.89%
By Road 85.72% 87.62% 83.78%

For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Education

With over 97 000 students, the metropolitan area of Lille is one of the first student cities in France. The Catholic University was founded in 1875. Today it has law, economics, medicine, physics faculties and schools. Among the most famous is HEI (Hautes Etudes d'Ingenieurs) founded in 1885, ranked 20th among engineering schools, with the specificity of graduating polyvalent engineers,EDHEC Business School founded in 1906, the ESC Lille Graduate School of Business founded in 1892, the IESEG currently ranked within the top 5, 10 and 15 business schools in France, respectively. In 1924 ESJ - a leading journalism school - was established, in 1970 three public universities (Lille I, II and III) were created, and in 1992 the Institut d'études politiques de Lille. Also, in Lille is located the Ecole Centrale de Lille, one of the five great schools of engineering in France. Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; pinyin: Hēilóngjiāng; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ... EDHEC (Ecole Des Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord) is a French business school founded in 1906. ... IESEG is a French business school located in Lille, in the north of France. ... The Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille (USTL) or Université de Lille I is a French university with 20,000 students, plus 14500 students in continuing education (2004). ... The Université du droit et de la santé de Lille or Université de Lille II is a French university. ... The Institut détudes politiques de Lille or Sciences Po Lille or IEP Lille is an IEP based in Lille. ... The École Centrale de Lille, located in Villeneuve dAscq, near Lille, France, is one of the French Grandes écoles of engineering. ...


Miscellaneous

 The urban area is one of the biggest in France with more than 1 million inhabitants. 

The Euralille urban development project, centred around the new TGV station has fostered a long debate among Lille's citizens. The project has finally been completed with modern architecture and disruption to the ancient city centre. Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... This article is about building architecture. ...


Lille was elected European Capital of Culture in 2004, along with the Italian city of Genoa The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ...

Old house in Lille's historical centre
Old house in Lille's historical centre

Lille is part of the Lille Métropole Communauté urbaine (formerly also known as C.U.D.L.). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 2624 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 2624 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lille Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Founded December 22, 1967 President Pierre Mauroy (PS) (since 1989) Communes 85 Area 611. ... The Lille Métropole Communauté urbaine was created in 1966, it is a group of 87 communes around Lille, in northern France, with almost 1. ...


Lille's football club the Lille Olympique Sporting Club is one of the major teams in the French football league, has won 8 major national trophies and now reagularly features in the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. Lille Olympique Sporting Club is a French football club, based in the northern city of Lille founded in 1944 from the merger of the Olympique Lillois (founded in 1902) and the SC Fives (founded in 1901). ... The UEFA Champions League (also known as the European Cup, UCL, CE1, C1[1] or CL) is a seasonal club football competition organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) since 1955 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ...


Lille's Fine Arts Museum (Musée des beaux-arts) is the second largest in France, after the Louvre.


Since 2006, Lille is home to the Lille Comics Festival, the main british and american comic books convention in the north of France, held in november, on the first week end. (http://www.lillecomicsfestival.com) Since 2006, the Lille Comics Festival is the main british and american comic books convention in the north of France, held in november, on the first week end. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...


The European Railway Agency (http://www.era.eu.int/) has offices in Lille and Valenciennes.


Émile Zola's novel Germinal is set near Lille, in Marchiennes. Émile Zola (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French novelist, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Germinal (1885) is the thirteenth novel in Emile Zolas twenty-volume series Les Rougon-Macquart. ... Marchiennes is a French town situated in the Nord (department) in the région of Nord-Pas de Calais. ...


Famous people from Lille

Scientists and industrialists

Charles-Joseph Panckoucke (26 November 1736 - 19 December 1798) was a French writer and publisher, notable for the Encyclopédie méthodique, a successor to the Encyclopédie of Diderot. ... The Mercure de France was a French gazette and literary magazine first published from 1672 to 1724 (with an interruption in 1674-1677) under the title Mercure galant (sometimes spelled Mercure gallant) (1672-1674) and Nouveau Mercure galant (1677-1724). ... Auguste (left) and Louis Lumière. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Léon Charles Albert Calmette (July 12, 1863 – October 29, 1933) was a French physician, bacteriologist and immunologist, and an important officer of the Pasteur Institute. ... Jean-Marie Camille Guérin (b. ... Jean Baptiste Perrin, generally known as Jean Perrin (Lille, September 30, 1870 – April 17, New York, 1942), was a French physicist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... The Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) is the largest and most prominent public research organization in France. ... Jean-Alexandre-Eugène Dieudonné (July 1, 1906 - November 29, 1992) was a French mathematician, known for research in abstract algebra and functional analysis, for close involvement with the Nicolas Bourbaki pseudonymous group and the Éléments de géométrie algébrique project of Alexander Grothendieck, and as a...

Artists

  • Renée Adorée (1898–1933), actress.
  • Alfred-Pierre Agache (1843–1915), academic painter
  • Robert Arnoux (1899–1964), actor.
  • Gilles Béhat (1949-), actor and director.
  • Émile Bernard (1868–1941), neoimpressionist painter and friend of Paul Gauguin
  • Line Dariel (1886–1956), comedian.
  • Alain Decaux (1925-), television presenter, minister, writer, and member of the Académie Française.
  • Raoul de Godewaersvelde (1928–1977), singer.
  • Carolus-Duran (1837–1917), painter.
  • Julien Duvivier (1896–1967), director.
  • Pierre Degeyter (1848–1932), worker and composer of the music of the Internationale.
  • Alexandre Desrousseaux (1820–1892), songwriter.
  • Yvonne Furneaux (1928-), actress.
  • Kamini (1980- ), rap singer, hits success in 2006 in France with the funny "rural-rap" Marly-Gomont
  • Édouard Lalo (1823–1892), composer.
  • Antoine Renard (1825–1872), composer (Temps des cerises).
  • Paul Gachet (1828-1909), Doctor most famous for treating the painter Vincent van Gogh
  • Albert Samain (1858–1900), poet.
  • Léopold Simons (1901–1979), poet, caricaturist, painter, sculptor.
  • Philippe Noiret (1930–2006), actor.
  • Serge Lutens (born 1942) photographer, make-up artist, interior and set designer, creator of perfumes and fashion designer.

Renée Adorée Renée Adorée (September 30, 1898–October 5, 1933) was a French actress. ... Alfred-Pierre Joseph Agache (b. ... Birth of Venus, Alexandre Cabanel, 1863 Academic art is a style of painting and sculpture produced under the influence of European academies or universities. ... Émile Bernard (April 28, 1868 – April 16, 1941), born in Lille, France, was a Post-Impressionist painter. ... Neoimpressionism was a late-19th century art movement led by Georges Seurat and Paul Signac, who exhibited their early work in 1884 at the exhibition of the Societé des Artistes Indépendents in Paris. ... Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Alain Decaux was born July 23, 1925 in Lille, France. ... The Académie française In the French educational system an académie LAcadémie française, or the French Academy, is the pre-eminent French learned body on matters pertaining to the French language. ... Raoul de Godewaersvelde (real name was Francis Albert Victor Delbarre), was a French singer born in 1928 in Lille and who died on April 14, 1977. ... Carolus-Duran, the name adopted by the French painter Charles Auguste Emile Durand (July 4, 1837 - 1917), who was born at Lille. ... Julien Duvivier (October 8, 1896 in Lille - October 30, 1967 in Paris) was a French film director. ... Pierre Chretien Degeyter (Ghent, 8 October 1848–1932) was a Belgian-born communist, songwriter, and woodcarver. ... The Internationale (LInternationale in French) is the most famous socialist song and one of the most widely recognized songs in the world. ... Édouard (Victor Antoine) Lalo (January 27, 1823 - April 22, 1892) was a French composer of Spanish descent. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... “van Gogh” redirects here. ... Albert Samain (1858-1900) was a French poet and writer of the Symbolist school. ... Philippe Noiret (October 1, 1930 - November 23, 2006) was a French film actor. ... {{}}Serge Lutens (born 14 March 1942) is a French photographer, filmmaker, perfumer and fashion designer. ...

Politicians and military

  • Lydéric, (620-?) legendary founder of the city.
  • Jeanne de Flandre, (1188/1200? -1244), Countess.
  • Jeanne Maillotte, (circa 1580), resistance fighter during the Hurlus attacks.
  • Louis Faidherbe (1818–1889), general, founder of the city of Dakar and senator.
  • Achille Liénart (1884–1973), « cardinal des ouvriers ».
  • Charles de Gaulle (1890–1970), general, resistance fighter, President of France.
  • Roger Salengro (1890–1936), minister, deputy, and Mayor of Lille.
  • Augustin Laurent (1896–1990), minister, deputy, resistance fighter, and Mayor of Lille.
  • Madeleine Damerment (1917–1944), French Resistance fighter - Legion of Honor, Croix de Guerre, Médaille combattant volontaire de la Résistance
  • Pierre Mauroy (1928-), deputy, senator, Prime Minister of France, and Mayor of Lille.
  • Martine Aubry (1950-), deputy, minister, and Mayor of Lille.

Jeanne, called of Constantinople (1199/1200 – 1244) was countess of Flanders and Hainaut. ... Louis Léon César Faidherbe (June 3, 1818 - September 29, 1889), French general and colonial administrator, was born at Lille. ... (City of Dakar, divided into 19 communes darrondissement) City proper (commune) Région Dakar Département Dakar Mayor Pape Diop (PDS) (since 2002) Area 82. ... Cardinal Achille Liénart was the Archbishop of Lille and later a cardinal involved in the Second Vatican Council. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Madeleine Zoe Damerment (November 11, 1917 - September 11, 1944) is a heroine of World War II. Madeleine Damerment was born in the city Lille in the Nord département of France. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Lionel Jospin and Pierre Mauroy, October 17, 2000. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Martine Aubry (maiden name Delors), born on August 8th, 1950 in Paris is a French politician. ...

Sports

Didier Six (born August 21st, 1954 in Lille) is a French former footballer. ... The 1984 European Football Championship (Euro 84) final tournament was held in France. ...

Twin cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... The cathedral Mariendom at night. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... District Luxembourg Canton Esch-sur-Alzette Geography Area Area rank 14. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kharkiv highlighted. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Liège Arrondissement Liège Coordinates , , Area 69. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - City 319 km²  (123. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Safed (Hebrew: צְפַת, Tiberian: , Israeli: Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas; Arabic: صفد ; KJV English: Zephath) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... Saint-Louis or Saint-Louis du Sénégal (locally called Ndar in the Wolof language) is a city in the northwest of Senegal near the mouth of the Senegal River (, ). It is the capital of the Saint-Louis Region and has a population of 154,555 (2002 census). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... “Torino” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... See Buffalo for other places with this name. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... Nickname: Motto: Maju dan makmur (Malay: Progress and Prosper) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: , Country State Establishment 1857 Granted city status 1974 Government  - Mayor (Datuk Bandar) Datuk Abdul Hakim Borhan From 14 December 2006 Area  - City 243. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Including the annexed communes of Hellemmes and Lomme
  2. ^ a b Only the part of the metropolitan area on French territory.
  3. ^ Only the part of the urban area on French territory.
  4. ^ French territories only. Population 1.885.000 Including the part of the metropolitan area on Belgian territory (Mouscron, Kortrijk, etc.)

Overview Lomme is a city in northern France, which was absorbed by Lille in 2000. ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Hainaut Arrondissement Mouscron Coordinates , , Area 40. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Kortrijk Coordinates , , Area 80. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Lille

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lille - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2766 words)
The whole metropolitan area of Lille, both on French and Belgian territory (Kortrijk) was estimated in 2000 at around 1,730,000 inhabitants, ranking as one of the major metropolitan areas of Europe.
Lille is an important crossroads in the European TGV network: it lies on the Eurostar line to London and the Thalys network to Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam and Cologne.
Lille is part of the Lille Métropole Communauté urbaine (formerly also known as C.U.D.L. Lille's Soccer club the Lille Olympique Sporting Club is one of the major teams in the French Soccer league, has won 8 major national trophies and now reagularly features in the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup.
Lille - definition of Lille in Encyclopedia (496 words)
Lille is a city in northern France on the Deûle River.
Including those parts of the Lille metropolitan area which are on Belgian territory (such as Kortrijk), the overall population of the Lille-Kortrijk metropolitan area was estimated in 2000 at around 1,700,000, ranking as one of the major metropolitan areas of Europe.
Lille is an important crossroads in the European TGV network: it lies on the Eurostar line to London and the Thalys network to Brussels, Amsterdam and Cologne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m