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Encyclopedia > Life Magazine
A cover of Life Magazine from 1911

Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. Download high resolution version (600x744, 73 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (600x744, 73 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A database query syntax error has occurred. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...

Contents

LIFE, the photojournalism magazine

The best known is LIFE, the photojournalism magazine founded by Henry Luce in 1936 and owned by Time Warner. Its first issue was dated November 23. Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (i. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Time Warner Inc. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ...


LIFE was published weekly until dwindling circulations for magazines as a whole, coupled with rising advertising rates, caused the magazine to print its final weekly issue in December 1972 (its annual "Year in Review" edition). From there, LIFE was published fortnightly from 1974 to 1978, and was restarted as a monthly magazine in October, 1978. A weekly Life in Time of War was published for a month or two during the first Gulf War. Monthly publication ceased in 2000. December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Events January January 1 - The Copyright Act of 1976 takes effect, making sweeping changes to United States copyright law. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Events January January 1 - The Copyright Act of 1976 takes effect, making sweeping changes to United States copyright law. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


LIFE's original mission was "to see life; see the world." The magazine has published some of the most iconic images of events in the United States and the world.


LIFE 2004

Starting in October 2004, LIFE resumed weekly publication, this time as a supplement to U.S. newspapers. At its launch, it was distributed with over seventy newspapers; these had a combined circulation of over 12 million: 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A part indentified as separate from the newspaper itself, maybe fronting such interests: Gardening, Cooking, Property. ... This is a list of newspapers made and distributed within the United States. ...

Alaska

Arizona The Anchorage Daily News is a daily newspaper in Anchorage, Alaska. ...

California

Colorado The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The Mercs sections vary by day of the week, but Business, Sports, and The Valley are standard daily fare. ... The Fresno Bee is the newspaper serving Fresno, California, in the states Central Valley. ... The Sacramento Bee is a daily newspaper published in Sacramento, California. ...

Connecticut The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ...

Florida The Hartford Courant is Connecticuts largest daily newspaper, and the only morning newspaper for most of the state north of New Haven and east of Waterbury. ...

Georgia The Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel is the main daily newspaper of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and all of Broward County. ... The St. ... The Miami Herald is a daily newspaper owned by Knight Ridder. ...

  • Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
  • Macon Telegraph

Illinois

Indiana Front page of the Tribune incorrectly reporting that Dewey won the 1948 presidential election The Chicago Tribune, formerly self-styled as the Worlds Greatest Newspaper, remains the leading newspaper of the Midwest of the United States. ...

  • Fort Wayne Journal Gazette
  • Fort Wayne News-Sentinel

Kansas

Kentucky The Wichita Eagle is the primary newspaper for the city of Wichita, Kansas and the surrounding area. ...

Massachusetts The Lexington Herald-Leader is a Lexington, Kentucky-based newspaper. ...

Maryland The Boston Herald is a tabloid newspaper, the smaller of the two big dailies in Boston, Massachusetts, with a daily circulation of 242,957 in September 2002. ...

Michigan The Baltimore Sun is the major newspaper in Baltimore, Maryland, with a daily press run of about 430,000 copies, and a Sunday run of 540,000 copies. ...

  • Morning Sun
  • Daily Tribune
  • Macomb Daily
  • Oakland Press
Enlarge
LIFE magazine was honored on a stamp. This image, taken by Margaret Bourke-White, is from the cover of the first issue, November 23, 1936, of the Fort Peck Dam under construction in Montana

Minnesota File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Missouri The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-St. ... The St. ...

Mississippi The Saint Louis Post-Dispatch is the only major city-wide newspaper in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... The Kansas City Star is a newspaper in Kansas City, Missouri. ...

  • Biloxi Sun Herald

North Carolina

North Dakota The News & Observer logo The front page of The News & Observer from January 26, 2005 The News & Observer is the regional daily newspaper of the Research Triangle area of North Carolina. ...

New Jersey The Grand Forks Herald is a newspaper printed in Grand Forks, North Dakota. ...

New York Passaic County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Bergen County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ...

Ohio New York Daily News Building, Raymond Hood, architct, rendering by Hugh Ferriss The New York Daily News is one of the largest newspapers in the United States with a circulation well over 700,000. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid newspaper which primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the greater New York City metropolitan area. ...

Pennsylvania

South Carolina The Philadelphia Inquirer is the major daily newspaper for the Philadelphia area. ...

South Dakota This article is about the South Carolina newspaper; The State is also the name of a 1990s television series. ...

Tennessee

Texas The Commercial Appeal is the predominant daily newspaper of Memphis, Tennessee. ...

Virginia The Fort Worth Star-Telegram is the major daily newspaper serving Fort Worth and the western half of the North Texas area known as the Metroplex. ...

  • Daily Press (Newport News)

Washington

Wisconsin The Tacoma News Tribune is a newspaper in Tacoma, Washington. ... Kennewick is a city located in Benton County in south east Washington State. ...



LIFE's ten most important events of the second millennium

The magazine ranked its top ten events of the millennium: (1st millennium – 2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – other millennia) Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European colonization and decolonization...

  1. Bookprint (Johann Gutenberg, 1455)
  2. Discovery of New World (Christopher Columbus, 1492)
  3. A new major religion (Martin Luther, 1527)
  4. Steam engine starts industrial revolution (James Watt, 1769)
  5. Earth revolves around sun (Galileo Galilei, 1610)
  6. Germ theory of disease (Louis Pasteur, 1864; Robert Koch,1876)
  7. Gunpowder weapons (China, 1100)
  8. Declaration of independence (US, 1776)
  9. Adolf Hitler comes to power (1933)
  10. Compass goes to sea (China, 1117)

This list has been criticised for being overly focused on Western achievements. For example, the Chinese also invented a variant of book print long before Gutenberg, and until the mid 18th century the bulk of the world's printed material was Chinese. A book is a collection of leaves of paper, parchment or other material, bound together along one edge within covers. ... Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (circa 1398 – February 3, 1468), a German metal-worker and inventor, achieved fame for his contributions to the technology of printing during about the 1450s, including a type metal alloy and oil-based inks, a mold for casting type accurately, and a new kind... The New World is one of the names used for the continents of North and South America and adjacent islands collectively, in use since the 16th century. ... No authentic contemporary portrait of Columbus has been found; this late 19th-century engraving is one of many conjectural images For information about the director, see the article on Chris Columbus. ... Religion, a term sometimes used interchangeably with faith, is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine, and the moral codes, practices and institutions associated with such belief. ... Martin Luther (originally Martin Luder or Martinus Luther) (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German theologian and an Augustinian monk whose teachings inspired the Protestant Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ... A steam engine is a heat engine that makes use of the potential energy that exists as pressure in steam, converting it to mechanical work. ... The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the massive social, economic and technological change in 18th century and 19th century Great Britain. ... This article is about the Scottish engineer and inventor. ... Earth, also known as the Earth or Terra, is the third planet outward from the Sun. ... A Sun is the star at the centre of a solar system. ... Galileo Galilei (Pisa, February 15, 1564 – Arcetri, January 8, 1642), was a Tuscan astronomer, philosopher, and physicist who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... This article is about disease-causing organisms. ... A disease is any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist. ... Heinrich Hermann Robert Koch (December 11, 1843 - May 27, 1910) was a German physician. ... This article is about firearms and similar devices. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of a newly formed or reformed independent state from a part or the whole of the territory of another, or a document containing such a declaration. ... Adolf Hitler (20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945), a German politician who was the founder of the Third Reich (1933-1945), is widely regarded as one of the most significant and reviled leaders in world history. ... This article is about the navigational instrument. ...


LIFE's 100 most important people of the second millennium

The magazine also published a list of the "100 Most Important People in the Last 1000 Years": (1st millennium – 2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – other millennia) Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European colonization and decolonization...

  1. Thomas Edison
  2. Christopher Columbus
  3. Martin Luther
  4. Galileo Galilei
  5. Leonardo Da Vinci
  6. Isaac Newton
  7. Ferdinand Magellan
  8. Louis Pasteur
  9. Charles Darwin
  10. Thomas Jefferson
  11. William Shakespeare
  12. Napoleon Bonaparte
  13. Adolf Hitler
  14. Zheng He
  15. Henry Ford
  16. Sigmund Freud
  17. Richard Arkwright
  18. Karl Marx
  19. Nicolaus Copernicus
  20. Orville and Wilbur Wright
  21. Albert Einstein
  22. Mohandas Gandhi
  23. Kublai Khan
  24. James Madison
  25. Simón Bolívar
  26. Mary Wollstonecraft
  27. Guglielmo Marconi
  28. Mao Zedong
  29. Vladimir Lenin
  30. Martin Luther King Jr.
  31. Alexander Graham Bell
  32. René Descartes
  33. Ludwig Van Beethoven
  34. Thomas Aquinas
  35. Abraham Lincoln
  36. Michelangelo
  37. Vasco Da Gama
  38. Suleyman the Magnificent
  39. Samuel F. B. Morse
  40. John Calvin
  41. Florence Nightingale
  42. Hernán Cortés
  43. Joseph Lister
  44. Ibn Battuta
  45. Zhu Xi
  46. Gregor Mendel
  47. John Locke
  48. Akbar
  49. Marco Polo
  50. Dante Alighieri
  1. John D. Rockefeller
  2. Jean Jacques Rousseau
  3. Niels Bohr
  4. Joan of Arc
  5. Frederick Douglass
  6. Louis XIV of France
  7. Nikola Tesla
  8. Immanuel Kant
  9. Fan Kuan
  10. Otto von Bismarck
  11. William the Conqueror
  12. Guido of Arezzo
  13. John Harrison
  14. Pope Innocent III
  15. Hiram Maxim
  16. Jane Addams
  17. Cao Xueqin
  18. Matteo Ricci
  19. Louis Armstrong
  20. Michael Faraday
  21. Ibn Sina
  22. Simone de Beauvoir
  23. Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi
  24. Adam Smith
  25. Marie Curie
  26. Andrea Palladio
  27. Peter the Great
  28. Pablo Picasso
  29. Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre
  30. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier
  31. Phineas Taylor Barnum
  32. Edwin Hubble
  33. Susan B. Anthony
  34. Raphael
  35. Helen Keller
  36. Hokusai
  37. Theodor Herzl
  38. Elizabeth I of England
  39. Claudio Monteverdi
  40. Walt Disney
  41. Nelson Mandela
  42. Roger Bannister
  43. Leo Tolstoy
  44. John Von Neumann
  45. Santiago Ramon y Cajal
  46. Jacques Cousteau
  47. Catherine de Medici
  48. Ibn Khaldun
  49. Kwame Nkrumah
  50. Carolus Linnaeus
1922 cover, "The Flapper" by F. X. Leyendecker


This list, too, was sometimes criticized. Edison's number one ranking was challenged since there were others whose inventions (combustion engine, car, electricity-making machines, for example) which had greater impact than Edison's. The top 100 list was further criticised for mixing world-famous people of humankind, such as Newton and Einstein and Luther and da Vinci, with numerous Americans largely unknown outside of the United States. Thomas Alva Edison Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many important devices. ... No authentic contemporary portrait of Columbus has been found; this late 19th-century engraving is one of many conjectural images For information about the director, see the article on Chris Columbus. ... Martin Luther (originally Martin Luder or Martinus Luther) (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German theologian and an Augustinian monk whose teachings inspired the Protestant Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ... Galileo Galilei (Pisa, February 15, 1564 – Arcetri, January 8, 1642), was a Tuscan astronomer, philosopher, and physicist who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... Leonardo da Vinci Leonardo da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian Renaissance architect, musician, anatomist, inventor, engineer, sculptor, geometer, and painter. ... Sir Isaac Newton in Knellers 1689 portrait Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727 by the Julian calendar in use in England at the time; or 4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727 by the Gregorian calendar) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and alchemist who wrote... Ferdinand Magellan (Spring 1480 – April 27, 1521; Portuguese: Fernão de Magalhães; Spanish: Fernando de Magallanes) was a Portuguese sea explorer who sailed for Spain. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist. ... Charles Darwin, about the same time as the publication of The Origin of Species. ... Order: 3rd President Vice President: Aaron Burr; George Clinton Term of office: March 4, 1801 – March 3, 1809 Preceded by: John Adams Succeeded by: James Madison Date of birth: April 13, 1743 Place of birth: Shadwell, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1826 Place of death: Charlottesville, Virginia First Lady... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... Adolf Hitler (20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945), a German politician who was the founder of the Third Reich (1933-1945), is widely regarded as one of the most significant and reviled leaders in world history. ... Zheng He (Traditional Chinese:鄭和, Simplified Chinese: 郑和 , Hanyu Pinyin: Zhèng Hé, Wade-Giles: Cheng Ho) (1371 - 1435), a famous Chinese mariner and explorer, made the voyages collectively referred to as the Eunuch Sanbao to the Western Ocean (三保太監下西洋) or Zheng He to the Western Ocean, from 1405 to 1433. ... Time Magazine, January 14, 1935 Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and is credited with contributing to the creation of a middle class in American society. ... Sigmund Freud Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Richard Arkwright Sir Richard Arkwright ( the last of 13 children December 23, 1732, August 3, 1792) was an Englishman credited with the spinning frame — later renamed the water frame following the transition to water power. ... Karl Marx Karl Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was an influential German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary organizer of the International Workingmens Association. ... Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus; February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed the heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ... Orville Wright (August 19, 1871 - January 30, 1948), the younger of the Wright brothers, seen as one of the fathers of heavier-than-air flight. ... Wilbur Wright (April 16, 1867 - May 30, 1912), the elder of the Wright brothers, seen as one of the fathers of heavier-than-air flight. ... Portrait of Albert Einstein taken by Yousuf Karsh on February 11, 1948 Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a theoretical physicist who is widely regarded as the greatest scientist of the 20th century. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to world attention. ... Kublai Khan or Khubilai Khan (1215 - 1294), Mongol military leader, was Khan (1260-1294) of the Mongol Empire and founder and first Emperor (1279-1294) of the Yuan Dynasty. ... Order: 4th President Vice President: George Clinton; Elbridge Gerry Term of office: March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1817 Preceded by: Thomas Jefferson Succeeded by: James Monroe Date of birth: March 16, 1751 Place of birth: Port Conway, Virginia Date of death: June 28, 1836 Place of death: Montpelier, Virginia First... Simón Bolívar Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar y Palacios (July 24, 1783 – December 17, 1830) was a South American revolutionary leader. ... Mary Wollstonecraft; stipple engraving by James Heath, ca. ... Guglielmo Marconi (25 April 1874 – 20 July 1937) was an Italian electrical engineer and Nobel laureate, known for the development of a practical wireless telegraphy system commonly known as the radio. Marconi was President of the Accademia dItalia and a member of the Fascist Grand Council of Italy. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Mao. ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) (April 22 (April 10 (O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a Russian revolutionary, the leader of the Bolshevik party, the first Premier of the Soviet Union, and the founder of the ideology of Leninism. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Alexander Graham Bell ( March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922) was a scientist, inventor, and founder of the Bell Telephone Company. ... René Descartes René Descartes (IPA: , March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, worked as a philosopher and mathematician. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 - March 7, 1274) was a Catholic philosopher and theologian in the scholastic tradition, who gave birth to the Thomistic school of philosophy, which was long the primary philosophical approach of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... This page is about the artist. ... See Clube de Regatas Vasco da Gama for the football club. ... Suleiman the Magnificent Suleiman I (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566); in Turkish Süleyman , (nicknamed the Magnificent in Europe and the Lawgiver in the Islamic World, in Turkish Kanuni) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1520 to 1566 and successor to Selim I. He was born at... Portrait of Samuel F. B. Morse by Mathew Brady, between 1855 and 1865 Morse in earlier years Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872) was an American inventor, and painter of portraits and historic scenes; he is most famous for inventing the electric telegraph and Morse code. ... John Calvin John Calvin (July 10, 1509–May 27, 1564) founded Calvinism, a form of Protestant Christianity, during the Protestant Reformation. ... A young Florence Nightingale Florence Nightingale (May 12, 1820 - August 13, 1910), who came to be known as The Lady With the Lamp, was the pioneer of modern nursing. ... -1... Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister (April 5, 1827-February 10, 1912) was a famous British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Infirmary. ... Abu Abdullah Muhammad ibn Battuta (Tangier, Morocco, February 24, 1304 - 1377) was a Moroccan Berber traveller and explorer. ... Zhu Xi (朱熹, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhū Xī, Wade-Giles: Chu Hsi) (1130 - 1200) was a Song Dynasty (960-1279) Confucian scholar who became one of most significant Neo-Confucians in China. ... Gregor Johann Mendel (July 22, 1822 – January 6, 1884) was an Austrian monk who is often called the father of genetics for his study of the inheritance of traits in pea plants. ... John Locke John Locke (August 29, 1632–October 28, 1704) was a 17th century philosopher concerned primarily with society and epistemology. ... Jalauddin Akbar Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbár, (alternative spellings include Jellaladin) also known as Akbar the Great (Akbar_e_Azam) (October 15, 1542 – 1605) was the ruler of the Mughal Empire from the time of his accession in 1556 until 1605. ... Marco Polo, after a painting in Badia, Rome Marco Polo (September 15, 1254 – January 8, 1324) was a Venetian trader and explorer who, together with his father and uncle, was one of the first Westerners to travel the Silk Road to China (which he called Cathay) and visited the Great... Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... 1917 painting by John Singer Sargent. ... Jean-Jacques Rousseau Jean Jacques Rousseau (June 28, 1712 - July 2, 1778) was a Swiss-French philosopher, writer, political theorist, and self-taught composer of The Age of Enlightenment Biography of Rousseau The tomb of Rousseau in the crypt of the Panthéon, Paris Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland... Niels Bohr Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made essential contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics. ... Image of Joan of Arc, painted between 1450 and 1500 (Centre Historique des Archives Nationales, Paris, AE II 2490). ... Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass (born: Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey -- c. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Nikola Tesla (July 9/July 10, 1856 - January 7, 1943) was a physicist, inventor, and electrical engineer of unusual intellectual brilliance and practical achievement. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... Fan Kuan (范寬 ca. ... Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck-Schönhausen, Duke of Lauenburg (April 1, 1815 – July 30, 1898) was one of the most prominent European aristocrats and statesmen of the nineteenth century. ... King William I of England William I ( 1027–September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Guido of Arezzo or Guido Monaco (995-1050) is regarded as the inventor of modern musical notation (staff notation) that replaced neumatic notation. ... For the recipients of the Victoria Cross, see either John Harrison (VC 1857) or John Harrison (VC 1917) See also the author M. John Harrison John Harrison. ... Innocent III, né Lotario de Conti ( 1161–June 16, 1216), was Pope from January 8, 1198 until his death. ... Hiram S. Maxim Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim (February 4, 1840 - November 24, 1916) was the inventor of the Maxim Gun in 1884, the first portable, fully automatic machine gun. ... Jane Addams Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 - May 21, 1935) was an American social worker and reformer. ... C o Xuěq n (Pinyin) (Chinese: 曹雪芹, WG:Tsao Hs eh-chin) (? 1715 - c. ... Matteo Ricci (October 6, 1552 - May 11, 1610) was an Italian Jesuit priest whose missionary activity in China during the Ming Dynasty marked the beginning of modern Chinese Christianity. ... Louis Armstrongs stage personality matched his flashy trumpet as captured in this photo by William P. Gottlieb. ... Michael Faraday Michael Faraday (September 22, 1791 - August 25, 1867) was a British scientist (a physicist and chemist) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Simone de Beauvoir Simone de Beauvoir (January 9, 1908 - April 14, 1986) was a French author, philosopher, and feminist. ... Rumi Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi or Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Balkhi (also known as Mawlawi or Mawlana, meaning our guide or our lord in Arabic and Farsi, or Mevlana meaning our guide in Turkey) (September 30, 1207 - December 17, 1273 CE) was a Persian poet and Sufi mystic, who... Adam Smith Adam Smith (June 5, 1723 – July 17, 1790) was a Scottish political economist and moral philosopher. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Illustration from a 1736 English edition of I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura. ... Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... Louis Daguerre Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (1787 - 1851) was the Basque artist and chemist who is recognized for his invention of the Daguerreotype process of photography. ... Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (August 26, 1743 _ May 8, 1794) was a French nobleman prominent in the histories of chemistry, finance, biology, and economics. ... Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891), American showman who is best remembered for his entertaining hoaxes and for founding the circus that eventually became Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. ... Edwin Powell Hubble (November 20, 1889 – September 28, 1953) was a noted American astronomer, generally credited for discovering1 and proving redshift and that the universe is expanding. ... Susan Brownell Anthony Susan Brownell Anthony, (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was an American civil rights leader who, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led the effort to grant women the right to vote in the United States. ... This page is about the artist. ... Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deaf and blind American author, activist, and lecturer. ... The Great Wave Off Kanagawa. ... Theodor Herzl Theodor Herzl (or Tivadar Herzl) (May 2, 1860 – July 3, 1904) was an Austrian Jewish journalist who became the founder of modern political Zionism. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Portrait of Claudio Monteverdi in Venice, 1640, by Bernardo Strozzi Claudio Monteverdi ( May 15, 1567 (baptised) – November 29, 1643) was an Italian composer, violinist and singer. ... Walt Disney - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Nelson Mandela Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, (born 18 July 1918) a former President of South Africa, was one of its chief anti-apartheid activists, and was also an anti-apartheid saboteur. ... Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister KBE (born March 23, 1929) is a former British athlete best known as the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes. ... Leo Nikolayevitch Tolstoy (Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й) (September 9 (August 28, O.S.), 1828 - November 20 (November 7, O.S.), 1910) was a Russian novelist, reformer, and moral thinker, notable for his influence on Russian literature and politics. ... A separate article covers Saint John Neumann, the American priest. ... Santiago Ramon y Cajal Santiago Ramón y Cajal (May 1, 1852 - October 17/18, 1934) was a famous Spanish histologist and father of neuroscience. ... Jacques-Yves Cousteau (June 11, 1910 - June 25, 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519–January 5, 1589), born in Italy as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici, and later queen of France under the French name Catherine de M dicis, was the wife of King Henry II of France, of the Valois branch of the kings of... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Kwame Nkrumah Kwame Nkrumah (September 21, 1909 - April 27, 1972) was a Ghanaian politician and one of the most influential founders of Pan-Africanism. ... A painting of Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné  listen, and who wrote under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish scientist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... Life Magazine cover The Flapper by F. A. Leyendecker, 2 February, 1922. ... Life Magazine cover The Flapper by F. A. Leyendecker, 2 February, 1922. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The term flapper, which became common slang in the 1920s, referred to a new breed of young women who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered decent behavior. ...


Well-known employees

Alfred Eisenstaedt (December 6, 1898 _ August 24, 1995) was a photographer. ... Margaret Bourke-White (June 14, 1906 - August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and photo journalist. ... Robert Capa Robert Capa (1913 - May 25, 1954) born Ernest Andrei Friedmann in Budapest. ... Gordon Parks (born 1912) is an African American photographer, musician, poet, novelist, journalist, activist, and film director. ... Lee Miller is also the name of an Association football (soccer) player. ...

Life 1880s-1920s

The first "Life Magazine" was a weekly publication put out by the Life Publishing Company of Manhattan, New York City. It was known for its cartoons, pin up girl art, humorous pieces, and reviews of theater and cinema. For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... A cartoon is a form of art with diverse origins and even more diverse modern meanings. ... A pin-up girl is a woman whose physical attractiveness would entice one to place a picture of her on a wall. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of the entertainment industry. ...


In 1908 Robert Ripley publishes his first cartoon in Life, Ripley in turn becomes first publisher of Charles Schulz, of Peanuts fame. Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a comic strip featuring unusual, hard-to-believe facts from around the world. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ...


In 1918 Charles Dana Gibson became the magazine's president. 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 _ December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, noted for his creation of one of the first pin-up girls, the Gibson Girl. Woman Jurors by Charles Dana Gibson, 1902 He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ...




External links

  • Life magazine website (http://www.life.com/Life/)
  • Life's Millennium list I (http://www.life.com/Life/millennium/events/01.html)
  • Life's Millennium list II (http://www.life.com/Life/millennium/people/01.html)
  • LIFE to Return as Weekend Magazine (http://www.timewarner.com/corp/newsroom/pr/0,20812,670450,00.html)

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