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Encyclopedia > Life (magazine)
Philippe Halsman's famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe
Philippe Halsman's famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe

Life generally refers to two American magazines: Image File history File linksMetadata PhilippeHalsmanLife11061959. ... Image File history File linksMetadata PhilippeHalsmanLife11061959. ... Philippe Halsman (1906 - 1979) was a Latvian-born American photographer. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ...

  • A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936;
  • A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life appeared as a weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978; a monthly from 1978 to 2000; and a weekly newspaper supplement from 2004 to 2007 [1].

The Life founded in 1883 was similar to Puck, and published for 53 years as a general-interest light entertainment magazine, heavy on illustrations, jokes, and social commentary, and featured some of the greatest writers, editors and cartoonists of its era, including Charles Dana Gibson, Norman Rockwell, and Harry Oliver. (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Puck was a U.S. periodical published in New York from 1876 to 1918, originally in German and from 1877 in English as well. ... Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 _ December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, noted for his creation of one of the first pin-up girls, the Gibson Girl. Woman Jurors by Charles Dana Gibson, 1902 He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... Harry Oliver (April 4, 1888 — July 4, 1973) was an American humorist, artist, and Academy Award -nominated art director of films from the 1920s and 1930s. ...


The Luce Life was the first all-photography U.S. news magazine and dominated the market for more than forty years. The magazine sold more than 13.5 million copies a week at one point and was so popular that President Harry S. Truman, Sir Winston Churchill, and Gen. Douglas MacArthur all serialized their memoirs in its pages. Perhaps one of the best-known pictures printed in the magazine was Alfred Eisenstaedt’s shot of a nurse in a sailor’s arms, snapped on August 27, 1945, as they celebrated Victory Over Japan Day in New York City. The magazine's place in the history of photojournalism is considered its most important contribution to publishing. Luce purchased the rights to the name from the publishers of the first Life but sold its subscription list and features to another magazine; there was no editorial continuity between the two publications. Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was an English politician, soldier in the British Army, orator, and strategist, and is studied as part of the modern British and world history. ... Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 - April 5, 1964), was an American Field Marshal (only in the Philippines) and general who played a prominent role in the Pacific theater of World War II. He was poised to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945 but was instead instructed to accept... Eisenstaedts magnum opus, the V-J Day kiss. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 15 August 1945 marked Victory over Japan or VJ Day, taking a name similar to Victory in Europe Day, which was generally known as VE Day. ... “New York, NY” redirects here. ... Assault landing One of the first waves at Omaha Beach as photographed by Robert F. Sargent. ...


Life was wildly successful for two generations before its prestige was diminished by economics and changing tastes. Since 1972, Life has ceased publication twice, only to be brought back to readers in different incarnations.


Time Inc. announced March 26, 2007, that it will cease publishing of Life April 20, 2007, the last day for Life's print issue. The brand name will continue on the Internet, Time Inc., a unit of Time Warner said in a statement. [2] , [3]

Contents

Early history

A cover of the earlier Life Magazine from 1911
A cover of the earlier Life Magazine from 1911

Life was born January 4, 1883, in a New York City artist's studio at 1155 Broadway. The founding publisher was John Ames Mitchell, a 37-year old illustrator, who used a $10,000 inheritance to launch the weekly magazine. Mitchell created the first Life nameplate with cupids as mascots; he later drew its masthead of a knight leveling his lance at the posterior of a fleeing devil. Mitchell took advantage of a revolutionary new printing process using zinc-coated plates, which improved the reproduction of his illustrations and artwork. This edge helped because Life faced stiff competition from the bestselling humor magazines The Judge and Puck, which were already established and successful. Edward Sandford Martin was brought on as Life’s first literary editor; the recent Harvard graduate was a founder of the Harvard Lampoon. Download high resolution version (600x744, 73 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (600x744, 73 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “New York, NY” redirects here. ... An illustration by A.I. Keller from the 1901 edition of Amos Judd by John Ames Mitchell Publisher, architect, artist, novelist, mystic, mystery: John Ames Mitchell (1844-1918) was a Renaissance man who kept to himself but influenced many. ... The Judge was a magazine published in the United States of America around the turn of the century. ... Puck was a U.S. periodical published in New York from 1876 to 1918, originally in German and from 1877 in English as well. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The motto of the first issue of Life was “While there’s Life, there’s hope.” The new magazine set forth its principles and policies to its readers: “We wish to have some fun in this paper... We shall try to domesticate as much as possible of the casual cheerfulness that is drifting about in an unfriendly world... We shall have something to say about religion, about politics, fashion, society, literature, the stage, the stock exchange, and the police station, and we will speak out what is in our mind as fairly, as truthfully, and as decently as we know how.”[1]


The magazine was a success and soon attracted the industry’s leading contributors. Among the most important was Charles Dana Gibson. Three years after the magazine was founded, the Massachusetts native sold Life his first contribution for $4: a dog outside his kennel howling at the moon. Encouraged by a publisher who was also an artist, Gibson was joined in Life’s early days by such well-known illustrators as Palmer Cox (creator of the Brownie (elf), A. B. Frost, Oliver Herford, and E. W. Kemble. Life attracted an impressive literary roster too: John Kendrick Bangs, James Whitcomb Riley, and Brander Matthews all wrote for the magazine at the turn of the Century. Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 _ December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, noted for his creation of one of the first pin-up girls, the Gibson Girl. Woman Jurors by Charles Dana Gibson, 1902 He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Palmer Cox Palmer Cox (April 28, 1840-July 24, 1924) was a Canadian born artist, best known for his series of humorous verse cartoons about the mischievous but kind-hearted Brownies. ... A signature Cox Brownie A brownie, brounie/Urisk (Lowland Scots) or ùruisg/brùnaidh (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary kind of elf popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north). ... Arthur Burdett Frost (January 17, 1851 - June 22, 1928) was an early American illustrator, graphic artist, and comics writer. ... Oliver Herford (1863 - 1935) was a British born American writer, artist and illustrator who has been called The American Oscar Wilde. As a frequent contributor to The Mentor, Life, and Ladies Home Journal, he sometimes signed his artwork as O Herford. In 1906 he wrote and illustrated the Little Book... Edward Winsor Kemble (January 18, 1861–September 19, 1933) was an American cartoonist and illustrator. ... John Kendrick Bangs John Kendrick Bangs (May 27, 1862 - January 21, 1922) was an American author and satirist, and the creator of modern Bangsian fantasy, the school of fantasy writing that sets the plot wholly or partially in the afterlife. ... Honorary statue of James Whitcomb Riley on courthouse lawn in Greenfield, Indiana James Whitcomb Riley (Greenfield, Indiana October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916), American writer and poet called the Hoosier poet and Americas Childrens Poet made a start writing newspaper verse in Hoosier dialect for the Indianapolis Journal... James Brander Matthews (born February 21, 1852 in New Orleans; died March 31, 1929 in New York City), was a U.S. writer and educator. ...


However, Life also had its dark side. Mitchell was sometimes accused of outright anti-Semitism. When the magazine blamed the theatrical team of Klaw & Erlanger for Chicago’s grisly Iroquois Theater Fire in 1903, a national uproar ensued. Life’s drama critic, the rascal James Stetson Metcalfe, was barred from the 47 Manhattan theatres controlled by the so-called Theatrical Syndicate. His magazine hit back with terrible cartoons of grotesque Jews with enormous noses. The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Klaw & Erlanger was the New York City based theatrical production partnership of entrepreneur A.L. Erlanger and lawyer Marcus Klaw. ... The Iroquois Theater Fire in Chicago, Illinois, claimed 602 lives on December 30, 1903. ... The Theatrical Syndicate was established in New York City, New York in 1896 by producers and investors Charles Frohman, Al Hayman, Abe Erlanger, Mark Klaw, Samuel F. Nixon, and Fred Zimmerman. ...


Life became a place that discovered new talent; this was particularly true among illustrators. In 1908 Robert Ripley published his first cartoon in Life, 20 years before his Believe It or Not! fame. Norman Rockwell’s first cover for Life, "Tain’t You", was published May 10, 1917. Rockwell's paintings were featured on Life’s cover 28 times between 1917 and 1924. Rea Irvin, the first art director of The New Yorker and creator of Eustace Tilley, got his start drawing covers for Life. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the TV series, see Ripleys Believe It or Not (TV series). ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ...


Just as pictures would later become Life’s most compelling feature, Charles Dana Gibson dreamed up its most celebrated figure. His creation, the Gibson Girl, was a tall, regal beauty. After her early Life appearances in the 1890s, the Gibson Girl became the nation’s feminine ideal. The Gibson Girl was a publishing sensation and earned a place in fashion history. Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 _ December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, noted for his creation of one of the first pin-up girls, the Gibson Girl. Woman Jurors by Charles Dana Gibson, 1902 He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... A USPS stamp depicting a Gibson girl. ...


This version of Life took sides in politics and international affairs, and published fiery pro-American editorials. Mitchell and Gibson were incensed when Germany attacked Belgium; in 1914 they undertook a campaign to push America into the war. Mitchell’s seven years spent at Paris art schools made him partial to the French; there wasn’t a shred of unbiased coverage of the war. Gibson drew the Kaiser as a bloody madman, insulting Uncle Sam, sneering at crippled soldiers, and even shooting Red Cross nurses. Mitchell lived just long enough to see Life’s crusade result in the U. S. declaration of war in 1917. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... J. M. Flaggs 1917 , based on the original British Lord Kitchener poster of three years earlier, was used to recruit soldiers for both World War I and World War II. Flagg used a modified version of his own face for Uncle Sam, and veteran Walter Botts provided the pose. ...


Following Mitchell’s death in 1918, Gibson bought the magazine for $1 million. But the world was a different place for Gibson’s publication. It was not the Gay Nineties where family-style humor prevailed and the chaste Gibson Girls wore floor-length dresses. World War I had spurred changing tastes among the magazine-reading public. Life’s brand of fun, clean, cultivated, humor began to pale before the new variety: crude, sexy, and cynical. Life struggled to compete on newsstands with such risqué rivals. Gay Nineties is a term that refers to the decade of the 1890s in the United States. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

1922 cover, "The Flapper" by F. X. Leyendecker

In 1920 Gibson tapped former Vanity Fair staffer Robert E. Sherwood to be editor. A World War I veteran and member of the Algonquin Round Table, Sherwood tried to inject sophisticated humor onto the pages. Life published Ivy League jokes, cartoons, flapper sayings, and all-burlesque issues. Beginning in 1920 Life undertook a crusade against Prohibition. It also tapped the humorous writings of Frank Sullivan, Robert Benchley, Dorothy Parker, Franklin P. Adams, and Corey Ford. Among the illustrators and cartoonists were Ralph Barton, Percy Crosby, Don Herold, Ellison Hoover, H. T. Webster, Art Young, and John Held Jr. Life Magazine cover The Flapper by F. A. Leyendecker, 2 February, 1922. ... Life Magazine cover The Flapper by F. A. Leyendecker, 2 February, 1922. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... Robert Emmet Sherwood (4 April 1896–14 November 1955) American playwright, editor, and screenwriter. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ... For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Frank Sullivan can refer to different people: Frank Sullivan: a writer Frank Sullivan: a film editor Frank Sullivan: a MLB player Frank Sullivan: a NHL player Frank Sullivan: a Winter Olympics ice hockey player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist, newspaper columnist, film actor, and drama literary editor. ... Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ... Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881 - March 23, 1960), was an American columnist (under the pen name F.P.A.), writer, and wit, part of the famous Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Art Young (1866-1943) was an American cartoonist and writer. ... John Held Jr. ...


Despite such all-star talents on staff, Life had passed its prime, and was sliding toward financial ruin. The New Yorker, debuting in February 1925, copied many of the features and styles of Life; it even raided its editorial and art departments. Another blow to Life’s circulation came from raunchy humor periodicals such as Ballyhoo and Hooey, which ran what can be termed outhouse gags. Esquire joined Life’s competitors in 1933. A little more than three years after purchasing Life, Gibson quit and turned the decaying property over to Publisher Clair Maxwell and Treasurer Henry Richter. Gibson retired to Maine to paint and lost active interest in the magazine, which he left deeply in the red. The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... George Lois cover design for Esquire (May 1969) Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... This article is about the American magazine publisher, for a series of mystery novels, see: Clair Maxwell mysteries Clair Maxwell was a twentieth century American magazine publisher. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...


Life had 250,000 readers in 1920. But as the Jazz Age rolled into the Great Depression, the magazine lost money and subscribers. By the time Maxwell and Editor George Eggleston took over, Life had switched from publishing weekly to monthly. The two men went to work revamping its editorial style to meet the times, and in the process it did win new readers. Life struggled to make a profit in the 1930s when Henry Luce pursued purchasing it. The Jazz Age, describes the period from 1918-1929, the years between the end of World War I and the start of the Great Depression, particularly in North America and (in the eras literature) specifically in Miami, largely coinciding with the Roaring Twenties; ending with the rise of the... George Cary Eggleston (1839 - 1911) was a U.S. author and writer. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ...


Announcing the death of Life, Maxwell declared: “We cannot claim, like Mr. Gene Tunney, that we resigned our championship undefeated in our prime. But at least we hope to retire gracefully from a world still friendly.” James Joseph Gene Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was the heavyweight boxing champion from 1926-28 who defeated Jack Dempsey in 1926 and 1927 in what became known as The Long Count Fight and retired undefeated after winning against Tom Heeney in 1928. ...


For Life’s final issue in its original format, 80 year-old Edward Sandford Martin was recalled from editorial retirement to compose its obituary. He wrote, “That Life should be passing into the hands of new owners and directors is of the liveliest interest to the sole survivor of the little group that saw it born in January 1883. ... As for me, I wish it all good fortune; grace, mercy and peace and usefulness to a distracted world that does not know which way to turn nor what will happen to it next. A wonderful time for a new voice to make a noise that needs to be heard!”[2]


The photojournalism magazine

Life (International Edition), January 19, 1948. Pictured is Muhammad Ali Jinnah of Pakistan.
Life (International Edition), January 19, 1948. Pictured is Muhammad Ali Jinnah of Pakistan.

In 1936 publisher Henry Luce paid $92,000 to the owners of Life magazine because he sought the name for Time Inc. Wanting only the old Life’s name in the sale, Time Inc. sold Life’s subscription list, features, and goodwill to The Judge. Convinced that pictures could tell a story instead of just illustrating text, Luce launched Life on November 23, 1936. The third magazine published by Luce, after Time in 1923 and Fortune in 1930, Life gave birth to the photo magazine in the U.S., giving as much space and importance to pictures as to words. The first issue of Life, which sold for 10 cents, featured five pages of Alfred Eisenstaedt’s pictures. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 150 KB) Summary AuthorScanner/uploader: wikipedist Faigl. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 150 KB) Summary AuthorScanner/uploader: wikipedist Faigl. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Muhammad Ali Jinnah (Urdu:  ) (December 25, 1876 – September 11, 1948) was an Indian Muslim politician and leader of the All India Muslim League who founded Pakistan and served as its first Governor-General. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Time Inc. ... The Judge was a magazine published in the United States of America around the turn of the century. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Eisenstaedts magnum opus, the V-J Day kiss. ...


When the first issue of Life magazine appeared on the newsstands, the U.S. was in the midst of the Great Depression and the world was headed toward war. Adolf Hitler was firmly in power in Germany. In Spain, Gen. Francisco Franco’s rebel army was at the gates of Madrid; German Luftwaffe pilots and bomber crews, calling themselves the Condor Legion, were honing their skills as Franco’s air arm. Italy’s Benito Mussolini annexed Ethiopia. Luce ignored tense world affairs when the new Life was unveiled: the first issue depicted the Fort Peck Dam in Montana photographed by Margaret Bourke-White. Hitler redirects here. ... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco Bahamonde (4 December 1892–20 November[1] 1975), commonly abbreviated to Francisco Franco (pron. ... Motto: De Madrid al Cielo (From Madrid to Heaven) Location Coordinates: Country Spain Autonomous Community Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid Province Madrid Administrative Divisions 21 Neighborhoods 127 Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón (PP) Area  - Land 607 km² (234. ... This or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hermann Göring delivering an honour (likely to be the Spanienkreuz, Spanish Cross) to a member of the Legion Condor (April 1939) The Condor Legion was a unit of Nazi Germanys air force which was sent as volunteers to support the right wing Nationalists (i. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister and dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ... The Fort Peck Dam is the highest of six major dams along the Missouri River, located in northeastern Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) USPS stamp depicting LIFE magazine cover bearing Fort Peck Dam photograph Margaret Bourke-White (June 14, 1904 – August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and photojournalist. ...


The format of Life in 1936 was an instant classic: the text was condensed into captions for fifty pages of pictures. The magazine was printed on heavily coated paper that cost readers only a dime. The magazine’s circulation skyrocketed beyond the company’s predictions, going from 380,000 copies of the first issue to more than one million a week four months later.[3] It spawned many imitators, such as Look, which folded in 1971. Look was a weekly, general-interest magazine published in the United States from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles. ...


Life got its own building at 19 West 31st Street, a Beaux-Arts architecture jewel built in 1894 and considered of "outstanding significance" by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Later it moved editorial offices to 9 Rockefeller Plaza. Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ...


Success

Luce pulled a stringer for Time, Edward K. Thompson, to become assistant picture editor in 1937. From 1949–1961 he was the managing editor and editor in chief, until his retirement in 1970. His influence was significant during the magazine’s heyday - roughly from 1936 until the mid-1960s. Thompson was known for the free reign he gave his editors, particularly a “trio of formidable and colorful women: Sally Kirkland, fashion editor; Mary Letherbee, movie editor; and Mary Hamman, modern living editor.”[4] Edward K. Thompson (1907 – October 1996) American writer and editor. ... For Sally Kirkland the Vogue & Life editor, see, see Sally Kirkland (editor). ... Mary Hamman (2 August 1907 – 18 November 1984) was and American writer and editor. ...

The magazine became archly conservative, and attacked organized labor and trade unions. In August 1942, writing of labor unrest, Life concluded: “The morale situation is perhaps the worst in the U.S. …It is time for the rest of the country to sit up and take notice. For Detroit can either blow up Hitler or it can blow up the U.S.” Detroit’s Mayor Edward J. Jeffries was outraged: “I’ll match Detroit’s patriotism against any other city’s in the country. The whole story in Life is scurrilous. …I’d just call it a yellow magazine and let it go at that.”[5] Martin R. Bradley, a U.S. Collector of Customs, was ordered to tear out of the August 17 issue five pages containing an article captioned “Detroit is Dynamite” before permitting copies of the magazine to cross the international border to Canada. Image File history File linksMetadata EdwardSteichenLife01101955. ... Image File history File linksMetadata EdwardSteichenLife01101955. ... Edward Steichen (March 27, 1879-March 25, 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator, born in Luxembourg. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a group of workers who act collectively to address common issues. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


When the U.S. entered the war in 1941, so did Life. By 1944 not all of Time and Life’s forty war correspondents were men; six were newswomen: Mary Welsh, Margaret Bourke-White, Lael Tucker, Peggy Durdin, Shelley Smith Mydans, Annalee Jacoby and Jacqueline Saix, an Englishwoman,whose name is usually omitted (she and Welsh are the only women listed Time's publisher's letter, May 8, 1944, as being part of the magazine's team) reported on the war for the company. Mary Welsh Hemingway (April 5, 1908 – November 26, 1986) was an American journalist and the wife of Ernest Hemingway. ... Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) USPS stamp depicting LIFE magazine cover bearing Fort Peck Dam photograph Margaret Bourke-White (June 14, 1904 – August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and photojournalist. ...


Life was pro-American and backed the war effort each week. In July 1942, Life launched its first art contest for soldiers and drew more than 1,500 entries, submitted by all ranks. Judges sorted out the best and awarded $1,000 in prizes. Life picked sixteen for reproduction in the magazine. Washington’s National Gallery agreed to put 117 on exhibition that summer. The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for...

Robert Capa's photo of a Chinese soldier

The magazine employed the distinguished war photographer Robert Capa. A veteran of Collier's magazine, Capa was the sole photographer among the first wave of the D-Day invasion in Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944. A notorious controversy at the Life photography darkroom ensued after a mishap ruined dozens of Capa’s photos that were taken during the beach landing; the magazine claimed in its captions that the photos were fuzzy because Capa’s hands were shaking. He denied it; he later poked fun at Life by titling his memoir Slightly Out of Focus. In 1954, Capa was killed while working for the magazine while covering the First Indochina War after stepping on a landmine. Image File history File linksMetadata RobertCapaLife05161938. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RobertCapaLife05161938. ... Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... November 24, 1917 cover Colliers Weekly was an American magazine that was published between 1888 and 1957. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Combatants French Union France State of Vietnam Viet Minh Commanders Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque (1945-46) Jean-Étienne Valluy (1946-8) Roger Blaizot (1948-9) Marcel-Maurice Carpentier (1949-50) Jean de Lattre de Tassigny (1950-51) Raoul Salan (1952-3) Henri Navarre (1953-4) Ho Chi Minh Vo Nguyen... U.S. Army soldier removes fuse from a Russian-made mine to clear a minefield outside of Fallujah, Iraq. ...


Each week during World War II the magazine brought the war home to Americans; it had photographers in all theaters of war, from the Pacific to Europe. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In May 1950 the council of ministers in Cairo banned Life from Egypt, forever. All issues on sale were confiscated. No reason was given, but Egyptian officials expressed indignation over the April 10, 1950, story about King Farouk of Egypt, entitled the “Problem King of Egypt.” The government considered it insulting to the country. Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


Life in the 1950s earned a measure of respect by commissioning work from top authors. After Life’s publication in 1952 of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, the magazine contracted with the author for a 4,000-word piece on bullfighting. Hemingway sent the editors a 10,000-word article, following his last visit to Spain in 1959 to cover a series of contests between two top matadors. The article was republished in 1985 as the novella The Dangerous Summer.[6] Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Matador Antonio Barrera (matador) in the capote de paseo (dress cape) before a bullfight during the 2003 Aste Nagusia festival in Bilbao, Spain For other uses, see Matador (disambiguation). ...


In February 1953, just a few weeks after leaving office, President Harry S. Truman announced that Life magazine would handle all rights to his memoirs. Truman said it was his belief that by 1954 he would be able to speak more fully on subjects pertaining to the role his administration played in world affairs. Truman observed that Life editors had presented other memoirs with great dignity; he added that Life also made the best offer. Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ...


Dorothy Dandridge was the first African American woman to appear on the cover of the magazine in November 1954. Dorothy Jean Dandridge (November 9, 1922–September 8, 1965) was an American actress. ...


Life's motto became, "To see Life; see the world." In the post-war years it published some of the most memorable images of events in the United States and the world. It also produced many popular science serials such as The World We Live In and The Epic of Man in the early 1950s. The magazine continued to showcase the work of notable illustrators, including Alton S. Tobey, whose many contributions included the cover for a 1958 series of articles on the history of the Russian Revolution. The World We live In appeared in the pages of LIFE magazine from December 8, 1952, to December 20, 1954. ... An example of Alton S. Tobeys semi-abstract curvilinear style: Sailboats (title on verso), acrylic on canvas, 24x20, date unknown (probably 1960s). ...


The magazine was losing readers as the 1950s drew to a close. In May 1959 it announced plans to reduce its regular newsstand price to 19 cents a copy from 25 cents. With the increase in television sales and viewership, interest in news magazines was waning. Life would need to reinvent itself.


The Sixties and the end of an era

Henri Huet's photograph of Thomas Cole featured on the cover of Life.
Henri Huet's photograph of Thomas Cole featured on the cover of Life.

In the 1960s the magazine was filled with color photos of movie stars, President John F. Kennedy and his family, the war in Vietnam, and the moon landing. Typical of the magazine’s editorial focus was a long 1964 feature on actress Elizabeth Taylor and her relationship to actor Richard Burton. Reporter Richard Meryman Jr. traveled with Taylor to New York, California, and Paris. Life ran a 6,000-word first-person article on the screen star. “I’m not a ‘sex queen’ or a ‘sex symbol,’ “ Taylor said. “I don’t think I want to be one. Sex symbol kind of suggests bathrooms in hotels or something. I do know I’m a movie star and I like being a woman, and I think sex is absolutely gorgeous. But as far as a sex goddess, I don’t worry myself that way... Richard is a very sexy man. He’s got that sort of jungle essence that one can sense... When we look at each other, it’s like our eyes have fingers and they grab ahold... I think I ended up being the scarlet woman because of my rather puritanical up bringing and beliefs. I couldn’t just have a romance. It had to be a marriage.”[7] Image File history File links Henri_Huet,_LIFE_cover,_110266. ... Image File history File links Henri_Huet,_LIFE_cover,_110266. ... Henri Huet covering the Vietnam War. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The historical plaque on the Apollo 11 lunar module Eagle, still remaining on the Moon4. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Richard Burton CBE (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984) was a Welsh actor. ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


In the 1960s, the magazine’s photographs featured those by Gordon Parks. “The camera is my weapon against the things I dislike about the universe and how I show the beautiful things about the universe,” Parks recalled in 2000. “I didn’t care about Life magazine. I cared about the people,” he said.[8] Gordon Parks at Civil Rights March on Washington, 1963. ...


In March 1967 Life won the 1967 National Magazine Award, chosen by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. The prestigious award paid tribute to the stunning photos coming out of the war in Southeast Asia, such as Henri Huet’s riveting series of a wounded medic that were published in January 1966. Increasingly, the photos that Life was printing of the war in Vietnam were searing images of death and loss. The National Magazine Award is a prestigious American award that honors excellence in the magazine industry. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious schools of journalism in the United States. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Henri Huet covering the Vietnam War. ...


However, despite the accolades the magazine continued to win, and publishing American’s mission to the moon in 1969, circulation was lagging. It was announced in January 1971 that Life would reduce its circulation from 8.5 million to 7 million in an effort to offset shrinking advertising revenues. Exactly one year later, Life cut its circulation from 7 million to 5.5 million beginning with the January 14, 1972, issue, publisher Gary Valk announced. Life was reportedly not losing money, but its costs were rising faster than its profits. January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Industry figures showed some 96 percent of its circulation went to mail subscribers and only 4 percent to newsstands. Valk was at the helm as publisher when hundreds lost their jobs. The end came when the weekly Life magazine shut down on December 8, 1972. December 8 is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


From 1972 to 1978, Time Inc. published ten Life Special Reports on such themes as “The Spirit of Israel”, “Remarkable American Women” and “The Year in Pictures”. With a minimum of promotion, those issues sold between 500,000 and 1 million copies at cover prices of up to $2.


Life as a monthly, 1978-2000

American comedian Woody Allen on the cover of LIFE

In 1978, Life reemerged as a monthly, and with this resurrection came a new, modified logo. Although still the familiar red rectangle with the white type, the new version was larger, and the lettering was closer together and the box surrounding it was smaller. (This "new" larger logo would be used on every issue until July 1993.) Image File history File linksMetadata PhilippeHalsmanLife03211969. ... Image File history File linksMetadata PhilippeHalsmanLife03211969. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ...


Life continued for the next 22 years as a moderately successful general interest news features magazine. In 1986, it decided to mark its 50th anniversary under the Time Inc. umbrella with a special issue showing every Life cover starting from 1936, which of course included the issues that were published during the six-year hiatus in the 1970s. The circulation in this era hovered around the 1.5 million-circulation mark. The cover price in 1986 was $2.25. The publisher at the time was Charles Whittingham. Life also got to go back to war in 1991, and it did so just like in the 1940s. Four issues of this weekly Life in Time of War were published during the first Gulf War. Charles Whittingham (16 June 1767-5 January 1840), English printer, was born at Caludon or Calledon, Warwickshire, the son of a farmer, and was apprenticed to a Coventry printer and bookseller. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded see section below The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War (16 January 1991...


Hard times came to the magazine once again, and in February 1993 Life announced the magazine would be printed on smaller pages starting with its July issue. This issue would also mark the return of the original Life logo.


Also at this time, Life slashed advertising prices 35 percent in a bid to make the monthly publication more appealing to advertisers. The magazine reduced its circulation guarantee for advertisers by 12 percent in July 1993 to 1.5 million copies from the current 1.7 million. The publisher in this era was Nora McAniff; Life for the first time was the same format size as its longtime Time Inc. sister publication, Fortune. Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ...


The magazine was back in the national consciousness upon the death in August 1995 of Alfred Eisenstaedt, the Life photographer whose pictures constitute some of the most enduring images of the 20th century. Eisenstaedt’s photographs of the famous and infamous — Hitler and Mussolini, Marilyn Monroe, Ernest Hemingway, the Kennedys, Sophia Loren — won him worldwide renown and 87 Life covers. Eisenstaedts magnum opus, the V-J Day kiss. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Sophia Loren (born September 20, 1934) is a motion picture and stage, Academy Award-winning actress, widely considered to be the most popular Italian performer. ...

American conjoined twins Abigail and Brittany Hensel on the cover of LIFE.

In 1999 the magazine was suffering financially, but still made news by compiling lists to round out the 20th Century. Life editors ranked its 100 Most Important Events of the Millennium. This list has been criticized for being overly focused on Western achievements. The Chinese, for example, had invented movable type four centuries before Gutenberg, but with thousands of ideograms, found its use impractical. Life also published a list of the 100 Most Important People of the Millennium. This list, too, was criticized for focusing on the West. Also, Thomas Edison's number one ranking was challenged since there were others whose inventions (the combustion engine, the automobile, electricity-making machines, for example), which had greater impact than Edison's. The top 100 most important people list was further criticized for mixing world-famous names, such as Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, and Leonardo da Vinci, with numerous Americans largely unknown outside of the United States (18 Americans compared to 13 Italians and French, 12 English). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 432 pixelsFull resolution (360 × 432 pixel, file size: 19 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the magazine or the individual... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 432 pixelsFull resolution (360 × 432 pixel, file size: 19 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the magazine or the individual... Abigail Hensel (left) and Brittany Hensel (right) Abigail Loraine Hensel and Brittany Lee Hensel (born 7 March 1990, Minnesota, United States) are dicephalic conjoined twins. ... A case of cast metal type pieces and typeset matter in a composing stick Movable type is the system of printing and typography using movable pieces of metal type, made by casting from matrices struck by letterpunches. ... Movable metal type, and composing stick, descended from Gutenbergs invention Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (c. ... A Chinese character. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. ... A colorized automobile engine The internal combustion engine is a heat engine in which the burning of a fuel occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ... Sir Isaac Newton, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist, regarded by many as the greatest figure in the history of science. ... Albert Einstein ( ) (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass-energy equivalence, . He was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French chemist best known for his remarkable breakthroughs in microbiology. ... The Mona Lisa Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath: scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, and writer. ...


It appeared that the money-losing magazine was just hanging on to make it into the 21st Century, and it did, but barely. In March 2000, Time Inc. announced it would cease regular publication of Life with the May issue. “It’s a sad day for us here,” Don Logan, chairman and chief executive of Time Inc., told CNNfn.com. “It was still in the black,” he said, noting that Life was increasingly spending more to maintain its monthly circulation level of approximately 1.5 million. “Life was a general interest magazine and since its reincarnation, it had always struggled to find its identity, to find its position in the marketplace,” Logan said.[9]


For Life subscribers, remaining subscriptions were honored with other Time Inc. magazines, such as Time. And in January 2001, these subscribers received a special, Life-sized format of "The Year in Pictures" edition of Time magazine, which was in reality a Life issue disguised under a Time logo on the front. (Newstand copies of this edition were actually published under the Life imprint.)


While citing poor advertising sales and a rough climate for selling magazine subscriptions, Time Inc. executives said a key reason for closing the title in 2000 was to divert resources to the company’s other magazine launches that year, such as Real Simple. Later that year, its parent company, Time Warner, struck a deal with the Tribune Company for Times Mirror magazines that included Golf, Ski, Skiing, Field & Stream, and Yachting. Life was not around when AOL and Time Warner announced their $183 billion merger, the largest corporate merger in history, which was finalized in January 2001.[10] An Issue of Real Simple Real Simple is a monthly womens interest magazine published by Time Publishing Ventures. ... Time Warner Inc. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... It has been suggested that AOL search data scandal be merged into this article or section. ... Time Warner Inc. ...


2004 and the return in Friday newspapers

Sarah Jessica Parker on the first weekly issue since 1972 dated October 1, 2004.

Life was absent from the U.S. market for only a few months, when it began publishing special newsstand "megazine" issues on topics such as 9/11 and the Holy Land in 2001. These issues, which were printed on thicker paper, were more like softcover books than magazines. Image File history File linksMetadata Hollywood_sjp_330x400. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hollywood_sjp_330x400. ... Sarah Jessica Parker (born March 25, 1965), is a Golden Globe and Emmy-winning American actress and an Emmy-winning producer, with a portfolio of television, movie, and theatre performances. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Beginning in October 2004, it was revived for a second time. Life resumed weekly publication as a free supplement to U.S. newspapers. Life went into competition for the first time with the two industry heavyweights, Parade and USA Weekend. At its launch, it was distributed with more than 60 newspapers with a combined circulation of approximately 12 million. Among the newspapers to carry Life: the Washington Post, New York Daily News, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Denver Post, and St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Time Inc. made deals with several major newspaper publishers to carry the Life supplement, including Knight Ridder and the McClatchy Company. PARADE is a magazine, distributed as a Sunday supplement in hundreds of newspapers in the United States. ... An Issue of USA WEEKEND USA WEEKEND Magazine is a national publication distributed through more than 600 quality newspapers in the United States. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ... The St. ... Partial list of newspapers The following is a partial list of newspapers owned by Knight Ridder: Contra Costa Times Detroit Free Press Kansas City Star The Miami Herald Philadelphia Inquirer Saint Paul Pioneer Press San Jose Mercury News The State External link Knight Ridder corporate website Categories: Companies traded on... The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI) is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California that operates a number of newspapers and websites. ...


This current version of Life retains its trademark logo, but sports a new cover motto, “America’s Weekend Magazine.” It measures 9½ x 11½ inches and is printed on glossy paper in full-color. On September 15, 2006, Life was just 20 pages. The editorial content contained one full-page photo, of actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and one three-page, seven-photo essay, of Kaiju Big Battel. September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Julia Elizabeth Scarlett Louis-Dreyfus (born January 13, 1961) is an Emmy, Golden Globe, and SAG Award-winning American actress and comedian who gained popularity while playing the role of Elaine Benes on the NBC sitcom Seinfeld in the 1990s. ... Kaiju Big Battel is an American performance entertainment troupe based in Boston, Massachusetts and created by Rand Borden, whose performances are parodies of both professional wrestling and the tokusatsu kaiju movies of Japan. ...


On March 26, 2007, Time Inc. announced that it would fold the magazine as of April 20, 2007, although it would keep the Web site.[4][5]


In popular culture

  • “There are events which arouse such simple and obvious emotions that an AP cable or a photograph in Life magazine are enough and poetic comment is impossible,” -- W. H. Auden, Poets at Work, Harcourt, Brace, 1948.
  • In 1937, Life commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house for a typical middle-income family. In 1993 the magazine revived the idea, launching a series of affordable houses designed by major American architects. Hugh Newell Jacobsen designed the “1998 Life Dream House”.
  • In 1955, one year after his death, the Overseas Press Club created the Robert Capa Gold Medal. It is given annually to the photographer who provides the "best published photographic reporting from abroad, requiring exceptional courage and enterprise". Life contributors have won seven times, the last being Larry Burrows posthumously in 1971. Like Capa, Burrows also died while working for Life, in a helicopter crash in Vietnam with his friend and fellow Life photographer, Henri Huet. It was Huet who had won the same award in 1967 for Life.[11]
  • In June 2004 it was revealed that former U.S. Army paratrooper Kelso Horne Sr.’s deathbed wish was for his ashes to be spread on the beach of Normandy, France. Horne was made world famous when Life featured his picture on its cover on August 14, 1944, two months after he jumped with 13,000 other men into northern France on D-Day. The 82nd Airborne Division soldier became a symbol of the American fighting man. When he died sixty years later, his ashes were taken to France.[12]
  • On Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, an oversized picture of the Life Magazine cover featuring Woody Allen can be seen on the office wall of Executive Producer and Head Writer Matthew Albie (portrayed by Matthew Perry).

Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) (IPA: ; first syllable of Auden rhymes with law), who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the worlds most prominent and influential architects. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rear Window (1954) is a motion picture directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on Cornell Woolrichs short story It Had to Be Murder (1942). ... James Stewart is the name of: // Actors James Stewart (actor) (1908–1997), Hollywood movie star, widely known as Jimmy Stewart. ... -1... Larry Burrows (May 29, 1926 to February 10, 1971) was a photographer best known for his pictures of the American involvement in the Vietnam War. ... Henri Huet covering the Vietnam War. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was formed originally as the 82nd Infantry Division on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ...

Contributors

Well-known contributors since 1936 have included:

Larry Burrows (May 29, 1926 to February 10, 1971) was a photographer best known for his pictures of the American involvement in the Vietnam War. ... Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) USPS stamp depicting LIFE magazine cover bearing Fort Peck Dam photograph Margaret Bourke-White (June 14, 1904 – August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and photojournalist. ... Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... Eisenstaedts magnum opus, the V-J Day kiss. ... Clay Felker is a magazine editor and journalist who founded New York Magazine in 1968. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Dirck Halstead (b. ... Mary Hamman (2 August 1907 – 18 November 1984) was and American writer and editor. ... Henri Huet covering the Vietnam War. ... Sally Kirkland (1 July 1912 – 1 May 1989) was a manager at Lord & Taylor, a fashion editor at Vogue and the only fashion editor at LIFE for 25 years. ... Will Lang Jr. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Hansel Mieth (Born Johanna Mieth 1909 Oppelsbohm, Germany - Santa Rosa 1998) was a documentary photographer and photojournalist. ... Lee Miller Elizabeth Lee Miller (23 April 1907 - 21 July 1977) was an American photographer. ... Born in Albania, Mili came to the United States in 1923. ... Gordon Parks at Civil Rights March on Washington, 1963. ... Art Shay is an American photographer and writer. ... An Australian soldier, Private George Dick Whittington, is aided by Papuan orderly Raphael Oimbari, near Buna on December 25, 1942. ... Edward Steichen (March 27, 1879-March 25, 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator, born in Luxembourg. ... Edward K. Thompson (1907 – October 1996) American writer and editor. ... Tony Zappone (born Anthony N. Zappone, October 9, 1947 in Tampa, Florida) began his career in journalism at age 14 as a freelance photographer with The Tampa Tribune, paid at the rate of three dollars per published news photo. ...

References

  1. ^ “Life: Dead & Alive”, Time, October 19, 1936.
  2. ^ “Life: Dead & Alive” Time,, October 19, 1936.
  3. ^ “Pictorial to Sleep”, Time, March 8, 1937.
  4. ^ Dora Jane Hamblin, That Was the "Life" (W.W. Norton & Company, 1977), p.161.
  5. ^ Mansfield (Ohio) News Journal, August 17, 1942.
  6. ^ Michael Palin “Michael Palin’s Hemingway Adventure”, PBS, 1999.
  7. ^ “Our Eyes Have Fingers”, Time, December 25, 1964.
  8. ^ The Rocky Mountain News, November 29, 2000, page 1.
  9. ^ “Time Inc. to cease publication of Life magazine”, CNNMoney.com, March 17, 2000.
  10. ^ Columbia Journalism Review
  11. ^ Overseas Press Club Robert Capa Gold Medal
  12. ^ Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 6, 2004, page MS1.

October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Life official website
  • Life's Millennium list I
  • Life's Millennium list II
  • Le magazine "Life", la chronique de l'Amérique

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