FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Lieutenant" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lieutenant
Common Military Ranks
Navies
(English-speaking
world)
Armies and
some Air Forces
Air Forces
(Commonwealth)
Admiral of the Fleet Field Marshal Marshal of the Air Force
Admiral General Air Chief Marshal
Vice Admiral Lieutenant General Air Marshal
Rear Admiral Major General Air Vice Marshal
Commodore Brigadier Air Commodore
Captain Colonel Group Captain
Commander Lieutenant Colonel Wing Commander
Lieutenant Commander Major Squadron Leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight Lieutenant
Sub-Lieutenant Lieutenant Flying Officer
Warrant Officer Warrant Officer Warrant Officer
Petty Officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading Rate Corporal Corporal
Seaman Private Aircraftman

Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. This article is about the use of the term rank. ... Admiral of the Fleet is a supreme naval position that has existed in historical navies and still exists in several modern-day navies. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Marshal of the Air Force is both a generic term for the most senior rank in an air force, equivalent to Field Marshal or Fleet Admiral and, in some air forces, a rank title. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom as well as in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and in the air forces... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... An air marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Marshal (Air Mshl or AM) is a rank in the Royal Air Force. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... An Air Vice Marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia An Air Vice Marshals command flag Air Vice Marshal is the third most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the inactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts... Commodore is a military rank used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a Flag Officer. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... . Captain, is the name most often given in naval circles to the NATO rank code of OF-5. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... A Captain in armies, air forces and marine forces, is a rank an army or air force rank with a NATO rank code of OF-2. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Leading Seaman (or Leading Rate) is the most senior of the junior rates in the British Royal Navy. ... This article is about the military rank. ... This article is about the military rank. ... This article is about a military rank. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Aircraftman (AC) (or Aircraftwoman (ACW)) is the lowest rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking below Leading Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-1. ... Navy is also:- shorthand for Navy Blue the nickname of the United States Naval Academy A navy is the branch of the armed forces of a nation that operates primarily on water. ... Paramilitary designates forces whose function and organization are similar to those of a professional military force, but which are not regarded as having the same status. ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ... This article is about the use of the term rank. ...


Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organizations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command," and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "Lieutenant Master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "Master" in an organization utilizing both such ranks. Notable uses include Lieutenant Governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... For information on the representative of the Queen in Right of Quebec, see Lieutenant Governor of Quebec. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word lieutenant derives from French; the lieu meaning "place" as in a position; and tenant meaning "holding" as in "holding a position"; thus a "lieutenant" is somebody who holds a position in the absence of his or her superior (compare the cognate Latin locum tenens). The Arabic word for lieutenant, mulāzim (Arabic: ملازم), also means "holding a place". Locum tenens is a Latin phrase literally meaning holding place. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ...


The British monarch's representatives in the counties of the United Kingdom are called Lords Lieutenant. The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland performed the function of viceroy in Ireland. In French history, "lieutenant du roi" was a title borne by the officer sent with military powers to represent the king in certain provinces. It is in the sense of a deputy that it has entered into the titles of more senior officers, Lieutenant General and Lieutenant Colonel. The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ...


In the nineteenth century those British writers who either considered this word an imposition on the English language or difficult for common soldiers and sailors argued for it to be replaced by the calque "steadholder" but failed and the French word is still used as well as its Lieutenant-Colonel variation in both the Old and the New World. // In linguistics, a calque (pronounced ) or loan translation is a word or phrase borrowed from another language by literal, word-for-word (Latin: verbum pro verbo) or root-for-root translation. ... Lieutenant Colonel (Lieutenant-Colonel in English from the French grades spelling) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies and most marine corps and air forces of the world, typically ranking above a Major and below a Colonel. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ...


Pronunciation

In contemporary English, the word is usually pronounced /lɛf'tɛnənt/(Audio ) in most dialects except American English, where it is pronounced /lu'tɛnənt/(Audio ).[1][2]. In 1791, English lexicographer John Walker lamented that the "regular sound" – /lju'tɛnənt/ – was not in general employ, giving the pronunciation current at the time as /lɛv'tɛnənt/ or /lɪv'tɛnənt/.[1] Walker's prescriptive pronunciation – which represents the regular English naturalization of the modern French word – took hold in the United States over the course of the nineteenth century; while an American dictionary of 1813 gives /lɛv'tɛnənt/[3] and New Yorker Richard Grant White, born in 1822, claimed never to have heard the /lju-/ form in his youth,[4] the /lɛv-/ or /lɛf-/ form was by 1893 considered old-fashioned.[1] The great influence exercised on American English by Noah Webster, who insisted (but inconsistently) on the congruence of orthography and pronunciation, may be partly responsible for the eventual triumph of the "regular" pronunciation in the United States.[5] In the rest of the English-speaking world, however, the Commonwealth form remains. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Leftenent. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Ltent. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A lexicographer is a person devoted to the study of lexicography, especially an author of a dictionary. ... John Walker (born 18 March, 1732 in Colney Hatch, Middlesex; died 1 August, 1807 in London) was an English lexicographer best known for his Rhyming Dictionary (1775) and Critical Pronouncing Dictionary (1791). ... In linguistics, prescription can refer both to the codification and the enforcement of rules governing how a language is to be used. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Dictionary (disambiguation). ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Richard Grant White (1822 - 1885), shakespearian scholar, born in New York State, was long Chief of the Revenue Marine Bureau, and was one of the most acute students and critics of Shakespeare, of whose works he published two editions, the first in 1865, and the second (the Riverside) in 1883. ... Noah Webster Noah Webster (October 16, 1758 – April 28, 1843) was an American lexicographer, textbook author, spelling reformer, political writer, word enthusiast, and editor. ...


The earlier history of the pronunciation is unclear; Middle English spellings included both forms like lutenand and lyeutenaunt suggesting the /lju-/ pronunciation and those like leeftenant and luftenand suggesting /lɛf-/.[1] The hypothesis that the labial-terminated initial syllable arose as a spelling pronunciation conflating vocalic and consonantal v (the letters u and v were not distinguished before the eighteenth century) is rejected by the Oxford English Dictionary as "not [in] accord with the facts".[1] The rare Old French variant spelling luef for Modern French lieu "place", on the other hand, supports the suggestion that the final /w/ of the Old French word was in certain environments apprehended as a /f/ /v/.[1] The development of the αυ and ευ diphthongs in the Greek language, pronounced /av/ and /ɛv/, respectively, in Modern Greek, may lend plausibility to this explanation. Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... Labials are consonants articulated either with both lips (bilabial articulation) or with the lower lip and the upper teeth (labiodental articulation). ... A spelling pronunciation is a pronunciation that, instead of reflecting the way the word was pronounced by previous generations of speakers, is a rendering in sound of the words spelling. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Look up V, v in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... French (français, spelled françois until 1835, both pronounced in standard French, but often heard pronounced ), or French language (langue française, formerly langue françoise, both pronounced ), is the third of the Romance languages in terms of number of speakers, after Spanish and Portuguese. ... In phonetics, a diphthong (also gliding vowel) (Greek δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally with two sounds, or with two tones) is a monosyllabic vowel combination involving a quick but smooth movement from one vowel to another, often interpreted by listeners as a single vowel sound or phoneme. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ...


British naval tradition preserved an intermediate pronunciation: /lə'tɛnənt/. This is not recognized as current by the OED, however, and by 1954 the Royal Canadian Navy, at least, regarded it as "obsolescent" even while regarding "the army's 'LEF-tenant'" to be "a corruption of the worst sort".[6] This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ...


Folk-etymological interpretations: "left-tenant"

In the past, folk etymology has associated the /lɛv/-/lɛf/ syllable with the verb 'to leave', drolly emphasizing that a lieutenant only took up his duties once his superior officer had 'left'.[citation needed] Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ...


Another folk etymology attributed the syllable to the fact that in typical propriety the person or persons standing to the rear-left of a gentleman held power and were typically those directly second to him. The person or persons standing to the rear-right were considered to have no or less standing than those to the rear-left, such as aides, bodyguards, wives, etc., often holding this position for simple facility rather than societal importance. This tradition remains in military parades, with lieutenants standing to the rear-left of the commanding officer (when facing the advance).[citation needed] It has been suggested that Drill (military) be merged into this article or section. ...


Army, marines and air forces

Conventionally, armies and other services or branches which use army-style rank titles (e.g. air forces, marine corps etc.) have two grades of Lieutenant. Some countries, however, use three. The Royal Air Force and some other Commonwealth air forces use a different rank system. Some Marine Corps use naval ranks. For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... For a particular Air Force, see List of air forces. ... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ... RAF redirects here. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


Lieutenant/First Lieutenant

Main article: First Lieutenant

The senior grade of Lieutenant is known as First Lieutenant in the United States, and as Lieutenant in the United Kingdom and the rest of the English-speaking world. In countries which do not speak English, the rank title usually translates as "Lieutenant", but may also translate as "First Lieutenant" or "Senior Lieutenant". First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


The Lieutenant was once the second officer in an infantry company or cavalry troop. The Captain was the company or troop commander and the third officer had a variety of titles, hence the difference in modern day rank titles. Some countries used First Lieutenant and Second Lieutenant for the two junior officers; some used Lieutenant and Senior Lieutenant; some used Lieutenant and Sub-Lieutenant; some (such as Britain) used Lieutenant and Ensign (infantry) or Cornet (cavalry). When the latter ranks were changed to Second Lieutenant, the senior rank remained as Lieutenant. Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company. ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... For the TV show, see F Troop. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... Cornet was the third and lowest grade of commissioned officer in a British cavalry troop, after the Captain and Lieutenant. ...


Some parts of the British Army, including the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers, and fusilier regiments, used First Lieutenant as well as Second Lieutenant until the end of the 19th century. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... Fusilier was originally the name of a soldier armed with a light flintlock musket called the fusil. ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ...


A Lieutenant usually commands a platoon or similar unit. Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ...


In the Royal Air Force and some other Commonwealth air forces, the equivalent rank is Flying Officer. From 1 April 1918 to 31 July 1919, the Royal Air Force maintained the rank of lieutenant. It was superseded by the rank of flying officer on the following day. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


In the East-European countries the equivalent is Senior Lieutenant. Modern Russian military ranks trace their roots to Table of Ranks established by Peter the Great. ...


Second Lieutenant

Main article: Second Lieutenant

Second Lieutenant is usually the most junior grade of commissioned officer. In most cases, newly commissioned officers do not remain at the rank for long before being promoted. Officers commissioned from the ranks may miss out the rank altogether. The rank is used throughout the English-speaking world. In non-English-speaking countries, the equivalent rank title may translate as "Second Lieutenant", "Lieutenant", "Sub-Lieutenant", "Junior Lieutenant", "Alférez" (Spanish Army and Air Force), "Alférez de Fragata" (Spanish Armada), "Fenrik" (Norwegian Army), or "Ensign". Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ...


A Second Lieutenant usually also commands a platoon.


In the Royal Air Force and some other Commonwealth air forces, the equivalent rank is Pilot Officer. A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting...


Third Lieutenant

Most countries do not maintain a third rank of Lieutenant. Those that do are all non-English-speaking, so the term "Third Lieutenant" is not actually used. The rank title may actually translate as "Second Lieutenant", "Junior Lieutenant", "Sub-Lieutenant" or "Ensign".


The Soviet Union used three ranks of Lieutenant, and so all Warsaw Pact countries also standardised their ranking system with three ranks. Some of the former Soviet and Warsaw Pact nations have now discarded the third rank, however. Not to be confused with the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ...


Countries with Third Lieutenant equivalent ranks include:

Throughout the 19th Century, the United States Army sometimes referred to Brevet Second Lieutenants as "Third Lieutenants." These were typically newly commissioned officers for which no authorized Second Lieutenant position existed. Additionally, the Confederate States Army also used Third Lieutenants, typically as the lowest ranking commissioned officer in an infantry company. “East Germany” redirects here. ... Hussarian Chorąży. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The word brevet has several meanings: In the military, brevet refers to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to temporarily hold a higher rank, without a corresponding pay increase. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ...


Circa 1981, United States Army ROTC cadets (officers in training) were, and may still be, considered as "Third Lieutenants" when visiting or training at a regular Army post. This rank being signified by a circle on the uniform and the cadets are treated as officers when on the post.


The designation 'third lieutenant' was used in the fictional armed forces in the novel Starship Troopers. This designation was given to officers in training at a certain stage. Third officers were officers, but they were the very bottom of the chain of command and did not carry any real authority. This status allows the officers-in-training to follow and study 'real' officers while maintaining the military staff structure.[7] For other uses, see Starship Troopers (disambiguation). ... For the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, see Chain of Command (Star Trek: The Next Generation). ...


Sub-Lieutenant

Main article: Sub-Lieutenant

A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ...

Police Lieutenant

Used in some police forces in the United States. It is normally roughly equivalent to the British Police Inspector. Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ...


Rank insignia

A Royal Navy Lieutenant's sleeve/shoulder insignia
A Royal Navy Lieutenant's sleeve/shoulder insignia
A US Navy Lieutenant's sleeve/shoulder insignia
A US Navy Lieutenant's sleeve/shoulder insignia

The insignia of a Lieutenant in many navies, including the Royal Navy, consists of two medium gold braid stripes (top stripe with loop) on a 'navy blue'/black background. This pattern was copied by the United States Navy and various Air Forces for their equivalent ranks grades (see Flight Lieutenant). Image File history File links UK-Navy-OF2. ... Image File history File links UK-Navy-OF2. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USN redirects here. ... A braid Step by step creation of a basic braid using three strings To braid is to interweave or twine three or more separate strands of one or more materials in a diagonally overlapping pattern. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ...


Unlike the United States Navy, which uses different insignia to distinguish specialists, the Royal Navy and other Commonwealth navies differentiated between line and specialist officers by placing coloured bands (known as 'lights') between the braids. These were abolished in the RN in 1955 (with other navies following suit), except for scarlet for medical officers (introduced in 1863) and orange for dental officers (introduced in 1924), which are still used. The former colours were: light blue for navigating officers (1863–1867 only), and in the 20th century for instructor officers; white for paymaster officers (from 1863); purple for engineer officers (from 1863); silver grey for shipwright officers (from 1918); dark green for electrical officers (from 1918); maroon, later replaced by salmon pink, for wardmaster officers (commissioned medical assistants) (from 1918); and dark blue for ordnance officers (from 1918). Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


Rarely seen these days is the rank insignia worn on formal tail-coats, which comprises a silver anchor and a star on a shoulder-board covered with gold lace.


In armies, marines and other services, there is much greater variation. In most English-speaking and Arabic-speaking countries, as well as a number of European and South American nations, full lieutenants (and equivalents) usually wear two stars and second lieutenants (and equivalents) one. The United States Army, Air Force and Marine Corps are notable exceptions. These services distinguish their lieutenant ranks with one silver bar for First Lieutenant and one gold (brass) bar for Second Lieutenant. Naval lieutenants also wear bars in the same configuration as their equivalents in the other services. In the United States services stars are used for flag- and general-rank insignia. In the British Army and Royal Marines a Lieutenant is distinguished by two diamond-shaped "pips" on the rank slide. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...


Prior to the 1968 unification of the Canadian Forces, the Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Navy followed the British pattern for second lieutenants and lieutenants. After unification, a second lieutenant wore a single gold ring around the cuff of the "CF Green" uniform and on shirt-sleeve epaulettes. A Lieutenant wore a single gold ring with a thinner one above it. On paper, these ranks applied to "army", "navy" and "air force" personnel, but in practise, aboard ship "naval" personnel (the former RCN was a very strong opponent of unification) continued to use the "acting sublieutenant", "sublieutenant" and "lieutenant" titles, until these were recognised by the Canadian Department of National Defence for Canadian Forces Maritime Command personnel. In the mid-1980s, the "naval" and "air" components reverted to uniforms similar to the former RCN and RCAF. Maritime Command kept their naval ranks but Air Command continued to use "second lieutenant" and "lieutenant" rather than reverting to pre-1968 RCAF ranks. The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... HMCS Bastion, flagship of the Canadian Navy. ...


See also

Look up Lieutenant in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Comparative military ranks are a means of comparing military rank systems of different nations as a means of categorizing the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. ... This article is about the use of the term rank. ... This chart represents the U.S. Navy officer rank insignia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... USN Officer Candidate insignia Officer Candidate is a rank in some militaries of the world that is an appointed position while a person is in training to become an officer. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... A General is a high rank in the United States military. ... This article is about the United States Army rank General of the Army. ... General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... A General is a high rank in the United States military. ... USN redirects here. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... USN Officer Candidate insignia Officer Candidate is a rank in some militaries of the world that is an appointed position while a person is in training to become an officer. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... LTJG insignia. ... The rank of Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) is used in the Navy, the Coast Guard, the NOAA Corps and the PHSCC with the pay grade of O-4. ... In the United States, Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the branch of service. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fleet Admiral Collar Device Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board Fleet Admiral Sleeve Insignia A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an admiral considered to be the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ... Insignia for Admiral of the Navy, worn by Admiral George Dewey Admiral of the Navy has only been held by one person in US Navy history: George Dewey. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... USN Officer Candidate insignia Officer Candidate is a rank in some militaries of the world that is an appointed position while a person is in training to become an officer. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... A General is a high rank in the United States military. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... LTJG insignia. ... The rank of Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) is used in the Navy, the Coast Guard, the NOAA Corps and the PHSCC with the pay grade of O-4. ... In the United States, Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the branch of service. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... PHS Cap Device The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC), also known as the Meditary, is the uniformed division of the United States Public Health Service (PHS) and one of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... LTJG insignia. ... The rank of Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) is used in the Navy, the Coast Guard, the NOAA Corps and the PHSCC with the pay grade of O-4. ... In the United States, Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the branch of service. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Seal of the NOAA Commissioned Corps The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps (NOAA Corps) is the smallest of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States, having only approximately 300 commissioned officers. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... LTJG insignia. ... The rank of Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) is used in the Navy, the Coast Guard, the NOAA Corps and the PHSCC with the pay grade of O-4. ... In the United States, Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the branch of service. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, and sometimes legally the Armed Forces of the Crown[1], encompasses a navy, army, and an air force. ... A brigadier generals rank insignia An officer of 1 star rank is a senior commander in any of the armed services holding a rank described by the NATO code of OF-6. ... An officer of 2 star rank is a senior commander in any of the armed services holding a rank described by the NATO code of OF-7. ... An officer of 3 star rank is a very senior commander in any of the armed services holding a rank described by the NATO code of OF-8. ... An officer of 4 star rank is a very senior commander in any of the armed services holding a rank described by the NATO code of OF-9. ... An officer of 5 star rank is a very senior commander in any of the armed services holding a rank described by the NATO code of OF-10. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... A Royal Navy captains rank insignia. ... Commodore Insignia Rank Pennant Commodore is a rank of the Royal Navy above Captain and below Rear-Admiral. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Admiral is a senior rank of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, outranked only by the rank Admiral of the Fleet. ... Royal Navy Insignia Shoulder board The flag of an Admiral of the Fleet is the Union Flag, and is in 1:2 rather than the 2:3 of other admirals flags. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Please see Captain for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the British armed forces that is used in the Army, Royal Navy, and the Royal Marines. ... Major is a military rank of the British Army which is used by both the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Insignia of a British Army Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant-Colonel is a British rank used in several Commonwealth countries superior to Major and subordinate to Colonel. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Colonel is a rank of the British forces, ranking just below Brigadier. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Please see Lieutenant General for other countries which use this rank Lieutenant-General (Lt Gen) is a senior rank in the British Army and the Royal Marines. ... UK insignia for a full General General is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Please see Captain for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the British armed forces that is used in the Army, Royal Navy, and the Royal Marines. ... Major is a military rank of the British Army which is used by both the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Insignia of a British Army Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant-Colonel is a British rank used in several Commonwealth countries superior to Major and subordinate to Colonel. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Colonel is a rank of the British forces, ranking just below Brigadier. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Please see Lieutenant General for other countries which use this rank Lieutenant-General (Lt Gen) is a senior rank in the British Army and the Royal Marines. ... UK insignia for a full General General is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Field Marshal Viscount Slim in his Field Marshals uniform, holding a marshals baton. ... RAF redirects here. ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer is the lowest commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting Pilot Officer (or APO) and Officer Cadet. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... An Air Vice Marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Vice Marshal is the third most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the inactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... An air marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Marshal (Air Mshl or AM) is a rank in the Royal Air Force. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom as well as in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and in the air forces... Marshal of the RAF sleeve/shoulder insignia Marshal of the Royal Air Force was the highest rank in the Royal Air Force. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Oxford English Dictionary.
  2. ^ American Heritage Dictionary, s.v. "Lieutenant".
  3. ^ J. R. Clemens, American Speech 7 (1932), 438.
  4. ^ H. L. Mencken, The American Language, 1921; 4th edition (1936), p. 345.
  5. ^ The Maven's Word of the Day, 7 January 2000.
  6. ^ A. D. Taylor, Customs of the Navy, 1954.
  7. ^ Starship Troopers, Robert Anson Heinlein.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lieutenant - LoveToKnow 1911 (1079 words)
Originally the lieutenant was a soldier who aided, and in case of need replaced, the captain, who, until the latter half of the 17th century, was not necessarily a seaman in any navy.
A "captain lieutenant" in the British army was formerly the senior subaltern who virtually commanded the colonel's company or troop, and ranked as junior captain, or "puny captain," as he was called by Cromwell's soldiers.
The lord lieutenant of a county, in England and Wales and in Ireland, is the principal officer of a county.
Lieutenant Governor Jari Askins (505 words)
Born and reared in Duncan, Oklahoma, Jari Askins was sworn in as Oklahoma’s 15th Lieutenant Governor in 2007, giving her the rare distinction of being involved in public service in all three branches of government.
Lieutenant Governor Askins received her BA in Journalism from the University of Oklahoma and earned a Juris Doctorate from the OU College of Law.
The Lieutenant Governor is an advocate for children and for greater efficiency in government.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m