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Encyclopedia > Licinius
Licinius
Augustus in the East
Coin featuring Licinius
Reign 11 November 308 - 311 (as Augustus in the west, with Galerius in the east);
311 - 313 (joint Augustus with Maximinus)
313 - 324 (Augustus in the east, with Constantine in the west - in 314 and 324 in competition with him);
Full name Flavius Galerius Valerius
Licinianus Licinius
Born c. 250
Moesia Superior
Died 325
Thessalonica
Predecessor Severus
Successor Constantine I
Wife/wives Flavia Julia Constantia
Issue Licinius
Aureus of Licinius, celebrating his tenth year of reign and the fifth year of his son Licinius (on the obverse).
Aureus of Licinius, celebrating his tenth year of reign and the fifth year of his son Licinius (on the obverse).
For other Romans of this name, see Licinius (gens).

Flavius Galerius Valerius Licinianus Licinius (c. 250 - 325) was Roman emperor from 308 to 324. Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ... Events By Place Roman Empire May 5 - Galerius issues his Edict of Toleration, ending persecution of Christians in his part of the Roman Empire. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... Galerius Maximianus (c. ... Events By Place Roman Empire May 5 - Galerius issues his Edict of Toleration, ending persecution of Christians in his part of the Roman Empire. ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... This article deals with 4th century Roman Emperor. ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February ca. ... Events August 30 - Council of Arles, which confirmed the pronouncement of Donatism as a schism, and passed other canons. ... Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Events Diophantus writes Arithmetica the first systematic treatise on algebra. ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Events May 20 - First Council of Nicaea - first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church: The Nicene Creed is formulated, the date of Easter is discussed. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... Flavius Valerius Severus as caesar. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February ca. ... Flavia Julia Constantia, also Constantia, (after AD 293 – about 330), was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and his second wife, Flavia Maximiana Theodora. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aureus-Licinius-nicomedia_RIC_vII_021. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aureus-Licinius-nicomedia_RIC_vII_021. ... Aureus minted in 193 by Septimius Severus to celebrate XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion that proclamed him emperor. ... Licinius was the nomen of the gens Licinia of ancient Rome. ... Flavius was the name of a gens in ancient Rome, meaning blonde. The feminine form was Flavia. ... Valerius was a Roman nomen of the gens Valerii, one of the oldest families of the city. ... Events Diophantus writes Arithmetica the first systematic treatise on algebra. ... Events May 20 - First Council of Nicaea - first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church: The Nicene Creed is formulated, the date of Easter is discussed. ... This is a list of Roman Emperors with the dates they controlled the Roman Empire. ... Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ...


Of Dacian peasant origin, born in Moesia Superior, Licinius accompanied his close friend the Emperor Galerius on the Persian expedition in 297. After the death of Flavius Valerius Severus, Galerius elevated Licinius to the rank of Augustus in the West on November 11, 308. He received as his immediate command the provinces of Illyricum, Thrace and Pannonia. Dacia, in ancient geography the land of the Daci, named by the ancient Greeks Getae, was a large district of Southeastern Europe, bounded on the north by the Carpathians, on the south by the Danube, on the west by the Tisa, on the east by the Tyras or Nistru, now... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Galerius Maximianus (c. ... Flavius Valerius Severus as caesar. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic, the increaser, or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ...


On the death of Galerius, in May 311, Licinius shared the entire empire with Maximinus Daia, the Hellespont and the Bosporus being the dividing line. Events By Place Roman Empire May 5 - Galerius issues his Edict of Toleration, ending persecution of Christians in his part of the Roman Empire. ... This article deals with 4th century Roman Emperor. ... The Helespont/Dardanelles, a long narrow strait dividing the Balkans (Europe) along the Gallipoli peninsula from Asia Anatolia (Asia Minor). ... Satellite image of the Bosporus, taken from the International Space Station in April 2004 Bosphorus Bridge Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge The Bosporus or Bosphorus, also known as the Istanbul Strait, (Turkish: İstanbul Boğazı or, for İstanbuls inhabitants, simply Boğaz; while the term Boğaziçi denotes those...


In March 313 he married Flavia Julia Constantia, half-sister of Constantine, at Mediolanum (now Milan), the occasion for the jointly-issued "Edict of Milan" that restored confiscated properties to Christian congregations and allowed Christianity to be professed in the empire. February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... Flavia Julia Constantia, also Constantia, (after AD 293 – about 330), was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Constantius Chlorus and his second wife, Flavia Maximiana Theodora. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February ca. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... The Edict of Milan (313) was a letter that Said religious toleration in the Roman Empire. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch...


In the following month, on April 30, Licinius inflicted a decisive defeat on Maximinus at the Battle of Tzirallum, after Maximinus had tried attacking him. Then, Licinius established himself master of the East, while his brother-in-law, Constantine, was supreme in the West. is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Tzirallum was fought in 313 between the armies of Licinius and Maximinus. ...


In 314, a civil war erupted between Licinius and Constantine, in which Constantine prevailed at the Battle of Cibalae in Pannonia (October 8, 314) and again two years later (after naming Valerius Valens co-emperor) in the plain of Mardia (also known as Campus Ardiensis) in Thrace. The emperors were reconciled after these two battles and Licinius had his co-emperor Valens killed. Events August 30 - Council of Arles, which confirmed the pronouncement of Donatism as a schism, and passed other canons. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aurelius Valerius Valens (? - 317) was Roman emperor from December 316 to March 1, 317. ... The Battle of Mardia was fought in 316 between the forces of Constantine I and Licinius. ... Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak  Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Attic Greek: ThrāíkÄ“ or ThrēíkÄ“, Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ...


In 324, Constantine, tempted by the "advanced age and unpopular vices" of his colleague, again declared war against him, and, having defeated his army at the Battle of Adrianople (July 3, 324), succeeded in shutting him up within the walls of Byzantium. The defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius in the Battle of the Hellespont by Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son and Caesar, compelled his withdrawal to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the Battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon (September 18), resulted in Licinius' final submission. While Licinius' co-emperor Sextus Martinianus was killed, Licinius himself was spared due to the pleas of his wife, Constantine's sister, and interned at Thessalonica. The next year, Constantine had him killed, accusing him of conspiring to raise troops among the barbarians. Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ... The Battle of Adrianople was fought on July 3, 324 between the armies of Constantine and Licinius. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... The Battle of the Hellespont was fought in 324 between a Constantinian fleet led by Flavius Julius Crispus and a larger fleet loyal to Licinius. ... Crispus on a coin issued to celebrate Constantine I victory over Goths in 323. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... Bithynia was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine (today Black Sea). ... After the defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius by Flavius Julius Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son, he withdrew to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the Battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon, resulted in his final submission. ... Chalcedon (Χαλκηδών, sometimes transliterated as Chalkedon; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient maritime town of Bithynia, in Asia Minor, almost directly opposite Byzantium, south of Scutari (modern Ãœsküdar). ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... Follis of Martinianus. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

  • Media related to Licinius from Wikimedia Commons.
  • De Imperatoribus Romanis website: Licinius
  • Socrates Scholasticus account of Licinius' end
Preceded by
Flavius Valerius Severus
Roman Emperor
308-324
with Galerius, Constantine I, Maximinus Daia, Valerius Valens and Martinianus
Succeeded by
Constantine I

  Results from FactBites:
 
Emperor Licinius (1445 words)
While Licinius was continuing his shrewd policy of alliance with Constantine, by marrying his sister Constantia at Mediolanum (Milan) in January AD 313 and confirming Constantine's famous Edict of Milan (toleration of Christians and Constantine's status as senior Augustus), Maximinus II's forces were gathering in the east, preparing to launch an attack.
Licinius' wife Constantia, who was the sister of Constantine, pleaded with the victor to spare both her husband and the puppet emperor Martianus.
And Licinius' illegitimate second son was reduced to the status of a slave labouring at a weaving mill at Carthage.
Licinius (247 words)
Flavius Galerius Valerius Licinianus Licinius, Roman emperor, from 307 to 324, of Illyrian peasant origin, was born probably about 250.
After the death of Flavius Valerius Severus he was elevated to the rank of Augustus by Galerius, his former friend and companion in arms, on November 11, 307, receiving as his immediate command the provinces of Illyricum.
The defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius by Flavius Julius Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son, compelled his withdrawal to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon (September 18), resulted in his final submission.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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