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Encyclopedia > License
Property law
Part of the common law series
Acquisition of property
Gift  · Adverse possession  · Deed
Lost, mislaid, and abandoned property
Alienation  · Bailment  · License
Estates in land
Allodial title  · Fee simple  · Fee tail
Life estate  · Defeasible estate
Future interest  · Concurrent estate
Leasehold estate  · Condominiums
Conveyancing of interests in land
Bona fide purchaser  · Torrens title
Estoppel by deed  · Quitclaim deed
Mortgage  · Equitable conversion
Action to quiet title
Limiting control over future use
Restraint on alienation
Rule against perpetuities
Rule in Shelley's Case
Doctrine of worthier title
Nonpossessory interest in land
Easement  · Profit
Covenant running with the land
Equitable servitude
Related topics
Fixtures  · Waste  · Partition
Riparian water rights
Lateral and subjacent support
Assignment  · Nemo dat
Other areas of the common law
Contract law  · Tort law
Wills and trusts
Criminal Law  · Evidence

To licence or grant licence is to give permission. A license (also spelled licence which is deemed to be more correct in the majority of English speaking countries, particularly in the Commonwealth[citation needed]) is the document demonstrating that permission. License may be granted by a party ("licensor") to another party ("licensee") as an element of an agreement between those parties. A shorthand definition of a license is "a promise (by the licensor) not to sue (the licensee)." Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... A gift, in the law of property, has a very specific meaning. ... In common law, adverse possession is the name given to the process by which title to anothers real property is acquired without compensation, by, as the name suggests, holding the property in a manner that conflicts with the true owners rights for a specified period of time. ... An English deed written on fine parchment or vellum with seal tag dated 1638. ... {{PropertyLaw}} In the [[common law]] of [[property]], personal belongings that have left the possession of their rightful owners without having directly entered the possession of another person are deemed to be lost, mislaid, or abandoned, depending on the circumstances under which they were found by the next party to come... Alienation, in property law, is the capacity for a piece of property or a property right to be sold or otherwise transferred from one party to another. ... Bailment describes a legal relationship where physical possession of personal property (chattels) is transferred from one person (the bailor) to another person (the bailee) who subsequently holds possession of the property. ... Estate is a term used in the common law. ... Allodial title is a concept in some systems of property law. ... Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A life estate, is a term used in common law to describe the ownership of land for the duration of a persons life. ... A defeasible estate is created when a grantor transfers land conditionally. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest - is an interest that accompanies a defeasible estate. ... A concurrent estate or co-tenancy is a concept in property law, particularly derived from the common law of real property, which describes the various ways in which property can be owned by more than one person at a given time. ... A leasehold estate is an ownership interest in land in which a lessee or a tenant holds real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord. ... This article refers to a form of housing. ... Conveyancing is the act of transferring the legal title in a property from one person to another. ... A bona fide purchaser (BFP)—or bona fide purchaser for value without notice (BFPFVWN)—in the law of real property, is an innocent party who purchases property for value, without notice of any other partys claim to the title of that property. ... Torrens title is a system of land title where a register of land holdings maintained by the state guarantees indefeasible title to those included in the register. ... Estoppel by deed is a doctrine in the law of real property that arises where a party conveys title to land that he does not own to a bona fide purchaser, and then acquires title to that land. ... A quitclaim deed is a term used in property law to describe a document by which a person disclaims any interest the grantor might have in a piece of real property, and passes that claim to another person (the grantee). ... The legal mechanism used to secure property in favor of a creditor|loans secured by mortgages, such as residential housing loans. ... Equitable conversion is a doctrine of the law of real property under which a purchaser of real property becomes the equitable owner of title to the property at the time he/she signs a contract binding him/her to purchase the land at a later date. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... In property law and real estate, a future interest - is an interest that accompanies a defeasible estate. ... A restraint on alienation, in the law of real property, is a clause used in the conveyance of real property that seeks to prohibit the recipient from selling or otherwise transferring his interest in the property. ... The rule against perpetuities is a rule in property law which prohibits a contingent grant or will from vesting outside a certain period of time. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the common law of England, the doctrine of worthier title was a legal doctrine that preferred taking title to real estate by descent over taking title by devise or by purchase. ... A nonpossessory interest in land is a term of the law of property to describe any of a category of rights held by one person to use land that is in the possession of another. ... An easement is the right to do something or the right to prevent something over the real property of another. ... A profit, in the law of real estate, is a nonpossessory interest in land similar to the better-known easement, which gives the holder the right to take natural resources such as petroleum, minerals, timber, and wild game from the land of another. ... A covenant running with the land, is a real covenant, in the law of real property. ... An equitable servitude is a term used in the law of real property to describe a nonpossessory interest in land that operates much like a covenant running with the land, requiring the landowner to maintain certain practices with respect to the land (e. ... In the law of real property, fixtures are anything that would otherwise be a chattel that have, by reason of incorporation or affixation, become permanently attached to the real property. ... Waste is a term used in the law of real property to describe a cause of action that can be brought in court to address a change in condition of real property brought about by a current tenant that damages or destroys the value of that property. ... A partition is a term used in the law of real property to describe the court-ordered division of a concurrent estate into separate portions representing the proportionate interests of the tenants. ... Riparian water rights (or simply riparian rights) is a system of allocating water among those who possess land about its source. ... Lateral and subjacent support, in the law of property, describes the right a landowner has to have that land physically supported in its natural state by both adjoining land and underground structures. ... An assignment is a term used with similar meanings in the law of contracts and in the law of real estate. ... Nemo dat quod non habet, literally meaning no one [can] give what they dont have is a legal rule, sometimes called the nemo dat rule that states that the purchase of a possession from someone who has no ownership right to it also denies the purchaser any ownership title. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The law of trusts and estates is generally considered the body of law which governs the management of personal affairs and the disposition of property of an individual in anticipation and the event of such persons incapacity or death, also known as the law of successions in civil law. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... American and British English spelling differences are one aspect of American and British English differences. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Contents

Occupational

Main article: Licensure

Obtaining a licence is required of a number of occupations and professions where maintenance of standards is required to protect public safety, for example physicians, psychologists, and electricians are often licensed by the government or professional societies. Licensure refers to the granting of a license (in the US, whilst, elsewhere the term registration is used), usually to work in a particular profession. ... The Doctor by Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... A psychologist is a scientist and/or clinician who studies psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior and cognition. ... TVA electricians, Tennessee, 1942. ...


Intellectual property

A licensor may grant license under "intellectual property" to do something (such as copy software or use a patented invention) without fear of a claim of intellectual property infringement brought by the licensor. For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ...


A license under intellectual property commonly has several component parts, including a term, territory, renewal, as well as other limitations deemed vital to the licensor.


Term: many licenses are valid for a particular length of time. This protects the licensor should the value of the license increase, or market conditions change.


Territory: a license may stipulate what territory the rights pertain to. For example, a license with a territory limited to "North America" (United States/Canada) would not permit a licensee any protection for actions in Japan.


Mass licensing of software

Mass distributed software is used by individuals on personal computers under license from the developer of that software. Such license is typically included in a more extensive end-user license agreement (EULA) entered into upon the installation of that software on a computer. A software license agreement is a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software which grants the user a software license. ...


Under a typical end-user license agreement, the user may install the software on a limited number of computers.


The enforceability of end-user license agreements is sometimes questioned. A software license agreement is a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software which grants the user a software license. ...


Trademark and brand licensing


A licensor may grant permission to a licensee to distribute products under a trademark. With such a license, the licensee may use the trademark without fear of a claim of trademark infringement by the licensor. “(TM)” redirects here. ...


Artwork and character licensing

A licensor may grant a permission to a licensee to copy and distribute copyrighted works such as "art" (e.g., Thomas Kincaid's painting "Dawn in Los Gatos") and characters (e.g., Mickey Mouse). With such license, a licensee need not fear a claim of copyright infringement brought by the licensor. Copyright symbol Copyright is a set of exclusive rights regulating the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. ... Kinkade with copy of his painting Heading Home presented to USO in October 2005. ... Mickey Mouse headshot The image above is proposed for deletion. ...


Academia

A book published in the U.S. and its licensed Chinese reprint (for sale in Mainland China only)
A book published in the U.S. and its licensed Chinese reprint (for sale in Mainland China only)
National examples of the License are listed at Licentiate

A licence is an academic degree. Originally, in order to teach at a university, one needed this degree which, according to its title, gave the bearer a license to teach. The name survived despite the fact that nowadays doctorate is typically needed in order to teach at a university. A person who holds a licence is called a licentiate. A U.S. book and its licensed Chinese copy. ... A U.S. book and its licensed Chinese copy. ... ... licentiate- noun Someone who holds a certificate of competence to practise a profession. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... licentiate- noun Someone who holds a certificate of competence to practise a profession. ...


In Sweden and some European universities it is approximately equivalent to an MPhil or MRes. In those countries, a licence is a middle-level degree between a master's degree and a doctorate, taken by doctoral canidates, and is a popular choice in those countries where a "true" Phd would take five or more years to achieve. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... In the U.K., the Master of Research degree is an advanced postgraduate degree available in a range of academic diciplines. ...


In other countries, i.e. Poland or France, a licence is achieved before the master's degree (it takes 3 years of studies to become licentiate and 2 additional years to become Master). In Portugal, before the Bologna Process, students would become licentiates after 5 years of studies (4 years in particular cases like Marketing, Management, etc; and 6 years for Medicine). However, since the adoption of the Bologna Process engineering degrees in Portugal were changed from a 5 year licence to a 3 year licence followed by 2 years for the MSc: Not having the MSc doesn't confer accreditation by the Ordem dos Engenheiros) licentiate- noun Someone who holds a certificate of competence to practise a profession. ... The purpose of the Bologna process is to create the European higher education area by making academic degree standards and quality assurance standards more comparable and compatible throughout Europe. ... The purpose of the Bologna process is to create the European higher education area by making academic degree standards and quality assurance standards more comparable and compatible throughout Europe. ... The Ordem dos Engenheiros (OE - Order of Engineers) is the regulatory and licensing body for the engineer profession in Portugal. ...


See also

A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Founded in 1985, the Licensing Industry Merchandisers Association (LIMA) is the industry trade group of the $80 billion licensing industry. ... In patent law, a cross-licensing agreement is an agreement according to which two parties grant a license to each other for the exploitation of the subject-matter claimed in patents. ... A statutory license or compulsory license is a copyright license to use content under reasonable and non-discriminatory terms. ... A compulsory license is a license to use a patent, copyright, or other exclusive right that a government forces the holder to grant to others. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... A Private Pilot Licence (or, in the United States, a certificate) permits the holder to operate an aircraft under visual flight rules. ... An amateur radio license is a legal document or permit giving official permission to the license holder to operate an amateur radio station. ... The FCCs official seal. ... Music licensing is the licensed use of copyrighted music. ... Dog licences (dog license in American English) are required in some jurisdictions to be the keeper of a dog. ... Current EU driving licence, German version - front 1. ... A television licence (or more correctly broadcast receiver licence, as it usually also pays for public radio) is an official licence required in many countries for all owners of television (and sometimes also radio) receivers. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... “Hunter” redirects here. ...

References

External links

Look up license in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...

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