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Encyclopedia > Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Logo

Seal
Location Washington, D.C.
Established 1800
Number of branches n/a
Collection size 30,011,749 Books (130,000,000 Total Items)
Annual circulation library does not publicly circulate
Population served 535 members of the United States Congress, their staff, and members of the public
Budget $603,623,000[1]
Director James H. Billington (Librarian of Congress)
Employees 3,783 [2]
Website http://www.loc.gov
Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894.
Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894.

The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. Located in Washington, D.C., it is the largest by shelf space and one of the most important libraries in the world. Its collections include more than 30 million catalogued books and other print materials in 470 languages; more than 58 million manuscripts; the largest rare book collection in North America, including a Gutenberg Bible (one of only four perfect vellum copies known to exist); over 1 million US Government publications; 1 million issues of world newspapers spanning the past three centuries; 33,000 bound newspaper volumes; 500,000 microfilm reels; over 6,000 comic book[3] titles; the world's largest collection of legal materials; films; 4.8 million maps; sheet music; and 2.7 million sound recordings. The head of the Library is the Librarian of Congress. Image File history File links US-LibraryOfCongress-Logo. ... Image File history File links US-LibraryOfCongress-Seal. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... James H. Billington James Hadley Billington (born June 1, 1929) is the current Librarian of Congress. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (406x1050, 512 KB) Summary Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the US Library of Congress from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (406x1050, 512 KB) Summary Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the US Library of Congress from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a country to serve as the preeminent repository of information for that country. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... A copy of the Gutenberg Bible owned by the U.S. Library of Congress The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible or the Mazarin Bible) is a printed version of the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible that was printed by Johannes Gutenberg, in Mainz, Germany in... Vellum (from the Old French Vélin, for calfskin[1]) is a sort of parchment, a material for the pages of a book or codex, characterized by its thin, smooth, durable properties. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Map (disambiguation). ... Sheet music is written representation of music. ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ...

Contents

History

Main Library of Congress Building at the start of the 20th century.
Main Library of Congress Building at the start of the 20th century.

The Library of Congress was established on April 24, 1800, when President John Adams signed an act of Congress providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington. Library of Congress Building, Washington DC. From postcard 1910 or before. ... Library of Congress Building, Washington DC. From postcard 1910 or before. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


The legislation appropriated $5,000 "for the purchase of such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress ..., and for fitting up a suitable apartment for containing them...." The original library was housed in the new Capitol until August 1814, when invading British troops set fire to the Capitol building, destroying the contents of the small library (3,000 volumes). The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders Robert Ross George Cockburn Unknown Strength 4,250 Unknown The Burning of Washington is the name given to the burning of Washington, D.C., by British forces in 1814, during the War of 1812. ...


Within a month, former President Thomas Jefferson offered his personal library as a replacement. Jefferson had spent 50 years accumulating books, "putting by everything which related to America, and indeed whatever was rare and valuable in every science"; his library was considered to be one of the finest in the United States. Jefferson, who was heavily indebted, sought to use the proceeds of the sale of his books to satisfy his creditors. He anticipated controversy over the nature of his collection, which included books in foreign languages and volumes of philosophy, science, literature, and other topics not normally viewed as part of a legislative library, such as cookbooks. To satisfy any objections as to the suitability of his collection for Congress' use, he wrote, "I do not know that it contains any branch of science which Congress would wish to exclude from their collection; there is, in fact, no subject to which a Member of Congress may not have occasion to refer." Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ...


In January 1815, Congress accepted Jefferson's offer, appropriating $23,950 for his 6,487 books, and the foundation was laid for a great national library. The Jeffersonian concept of universality, the belief that all subjects are important to the library of the American legislature, is the philosophy and rationale behind the comprehensive collecting policies of today's Library of Congress.


On December 24, 1851, a fire destroyed 35,000 books, an original portrait of Christopher Columbus, portraits of the first five US Presidents by Gilbert Stuart, and statues of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Marquis de Lafayette. is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... Self portrait, 1778 Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ...


Buildings of the library

The Library is now spread over three buildings in Washington, D.C.: For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

(Note: Between April 13, 1976 and June 13, 1980, the John Adams Building was known as the Thomas Jefferson Building.) The Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress The oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building opened in 1897. ... In Washington, D.C., Independence Avenue is a major east-west street running just south of the United States Capitol in the citys Southwest and Southeast quadrants. ... The John Adams Building of the Library of Congress The John Adams Building is one of three library buildings of the Library of Congress in the United States. ... The James Madison Memorial Building The James Madison Memorial Building is one of three buildings that make up the Library of Congress and is part of the United States Capitol Complex. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


In late-November 2005, the Library announced intentions to launch the World Digital Library, digitally preserving books and other objects from all world cultures. The World Digital Library (WDL) is a project by the Library of Congress to digitally preserve books and other objects from all world cultures. ...


Holdings

Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building.
Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building.

The Library developed a system of book classification called Library of Congress Classification (LCC) which is used by most US research and university libraries, although most public libraries continue to use the Dewey decimal system. Picture of the Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, August 12, 2002 File links The following pages link to this file: Library of Congress National library User:Raul654/favpics/2002 DC trip Categories: GFDL images ... Picture of the Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, August 12, 2002 File links The following pages link to this file: Library of Congress National library User:Raul654/favpics/2002 DC trip Categories: GFDL images ... The Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress The oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building opened in 1897. ... Library of Congress reading room The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. ... This is a list of libraries at universities. ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ... The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a proprietary system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876, and has since then been greatly modified and expanded through twenty-two major revisions, the most recent in 2004. ...


The Library serves as a legal repository for copyright protection and copyright registration, and as the base for the United States Copyright Office. Regardless of whether they are seeking copyright, all publishers are required to submit two copies of their copyrightable works to the Library - this requirement is known as mandatory deposit.[4] Parties wishing not to publish, need only submit one copy of their work. Nearly 22,000 new items published in the U.S. arrive every business day at the Library. Contrary to popular belief, however, the Library does not retain all of these works in its permanent collection, although it does add an average of 10,000 items per day. Rejected items are used in trades with other libraries around the world, distributed to federal agencies, or donated to schools, communities, and other organizations within the United States.[5] As is true of many similar libraries, the Library of Congress retains copies of every publication in the English language which is deemed significant. Not to be confused with copywriting. ... In some forms of copyright laws, only a copyright registration makes a creative work eligible for protection. ... The United States Copyright Office, a part of the Library of Congress, is the official U.S. government body that maintains records of copyright registration in the United States. ... A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a country to serve as the preeminent repository of information for that country. ...


The Guinness Book of World Records currently lists the Library of Congress as the "World's Largest Library".[6] This apparently is based on the shelf space the collection occupies; the Library of Congress states that its collection fills about 530 miles (850 km),[7] while the British Library, reports about 388 miles (625 km) of shelves.[8] The Library of Congress holds about 130 million items with 29 million books against approximately 150 million items with 25 million books for the British Library.[7][8] The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ...


It is estimated that the print holdings of the Library of Congress would, if digitized and stored as plain text, constitute 17 to 20 terabytes of information. This leads many people to conclude that 20 terabytes is equivalent to the entire holdings of the Library, but this is misleading because the Library contains many items in addition to books, such as photographs, maps, and sound recordings. (Occasionally, this figure has been referred to as a data transfer rate, LoC/s — Libraries of Congress per second – defined as 20 terabytes of data transferred per second). The Library currently has no plans for systematic digitization of any significant portion of its books. This article is about a measurement term for data storage capacity. ... The movement of data from one location to another is called data transfer. ...

Library of Congress

The Library makes millions of digital objects, comprising tens of terabytes, available at its American Memory site. American Memory is a source for public domain image resources, as well as audio, video, and archived Web content. Nearly all of the lists of holdings, the catalogs of the library, can be consulted directly on its web site. Librarians all over the world consult these catalogs, through the Web or through other media better suited to their needs, when they need to catalog for their collection a book published in the United States. They use the Library of Congress Control Number to make sure of the exact identity of the book. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... American Memory is an internet archive for public domain image resources, as well as audio, video, and archived Web content. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ...


The Library of Congress also provides an on-line archive of the proceedings of the U.S. Congress at THOMAS, including bill text, Congressional Record text, bill summary and status, the Congressional Record Index, and the United States Constitution. Congress in Joint Session. ... Look up Thomas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


The Library also administers the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, a talking and Braille library program provided to more than 766,000 Americans. This article is about the visual condition. ...


Using the Library

Library of Congress reading room
Library of Congress reading room

The library is open to the general public for academic research, and runs tours for visitors. Only those who are issued a "Reader Identification Card" may enter the reading rooms and access the collection. The Reader Identification Card is available in the Madison building to persons who are at least 18 years of age upon presentation of a government issued picture identification (e.g., driver's license, state ID card or passport). However, only members of Congress, Supreme Court Justices, their staff, Library of Congress staff and certain other government officials can actually check out books. Main Reading Room, Jefferson Building, The Library of Congress, August 12, 2002 Released under the GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Library Library of Congress Library of Congress Classification User:Raul654/favpics/2002 DC trip Categories: GFDL images ... Main Reading Room, Jefferson Building, The Library of Congress, August 12, 2002 Released under the GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Library Library of Congress Library of Congress Classification User:Raul654/favpics/2002 DC trip Categories: GFDL images ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of...


Libraries in the United States may request books and other items through interlibrary loan from the Library of Congress if these items are not readily available elsewhere. Since 1902, the Library of Congress has served as a "library of last resort." Interlibrary loan (abbreviated ILL and in some countries called interloan, document delivery, or document supply etc) is a service whereby a user of one library can borrow books, videos, DVDs, sound recordings, microfilms, or receive photocopies of articles in magazines that are owned by another library. ...


Annual events

The Great Hall interior
The Great Hall interior

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 705 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2520 × 2143 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 705 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2520 × 2143 pixel, file size: 2. ... The National Book Festival is an American event organised by the Library of Congress each year in Washington D.C.. Official website: http://www. ... History Founders Day orginated from a proclamation by the United States Continental Congress on October 11, 1782. ... Named in honor of the legendary George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin, the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song recognizes the profound and positive effect of popular music on the world’s culture. ... A Davidson Fellow is someone who the Davidson Institute for Talent Development has recognized as having contributed some great work to society. ...

See also

The Congressional Research Service is the public policy research arm of the United States Congress. ... The Federal Research Division (FRD) is the research and analysis unit of the United States Library of Congress. ... Library of Congress reading room The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. ... The Country Studies are works published by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress ( USA), freely available for use by researchers. ... A Library of Congress Living Legend is someone recognized by the Library of Congress for his or her creative contributions to American life. ... Print copy of LCSH available in most public libraries. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... The National Recording Registry is a list of sound recordings which are culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... The United States Copyright Office, a part of the Library of Congress, is the official U.S. government body that maintains records of copyright registration in the United States. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... DOCEX, the common name for Documents Expediting Project, was a program begun in 1946 by the Library of Congress (LoC) to distribute duplicate copies of government publications they received from federal government agencies. ... The Feleky Collection, acquired by the Library of Congress in 1953, consisted of more than 10,000 books and 15,000 periodical issues, including biographical files, newspaper clippings, questionnaires and other materials on approximately 920 Hungarian Americans, plus photographs, prints, music scores, maps, broadsides and posters, recordings, and manuscripts. ... The World Digital Library (WDL) is a project by the Library of Congress to digitally preserve books and other objects from all world cultures. ...

References

  1. ^ Annual report 2006
  2. ^ Year 2006 at a glance
  3. ^ About the Serial and Government Publications Division. The Library of Congress (2006-04-07). Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  4. ^ Mandatory Deposit. Copyright.gov. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  5. ^ Fascinating Facts. Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  6. ^ Largest Library. Guinness Book of World Records. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  7. ^ a b About the Library. Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  8. ^ a b Did You Know?. British Library. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Library of Congress

  Results from FactBites:
 
Library of Congress Blog (Library of Congress) (2022 words)
An earlier article claims it to be the first library to break with Dewey (or, one would assume, with any another established means such as the Library of Congress Classification System).
Before coming to the Law Library of Congress, Bryan was an Associate Professor of Law at the City University of Hong Kong for approximately fifteen years.
We used the Library of Congress’s 207th birthday (an odd number, I know) to launch this blog, so we thought tomorrow’s milestone would be a good reason to help some of our Law Library colleagues get in on the blogging game.
Library of Congress - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1285 words)
The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress.
The Library of Congress was established on April 24, 1800, when President John Adams signed an act of Congress providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington.
The Library developed a system of book classification called Library of Congress Classification (LC) which is used by most research and university libraries, although most public libraries continue to use the Dewey decimal system.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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