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Encyclopedia > Liberty Island
Liberty Island
Liberty Island

Liberty Island, formerly called Bedloe's Island, is a small uninhabited island in Upper New York Bay in the United States, best known as the location of the Statue of Liberty. The name Liberty Island has been in use since the early 20th century, although the name was not officially changed until 1956. Before the Statue of Liberty, Bedloe's Island was the home to Fort Wood, an eleven pointed star-shaped battery made of granite. Because of this, its nickname was "Star Fort". Image File history File links Liberty_Island. ... Image File history File links Liberty_Island. ... Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ... Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island Liberty Enlightening the World (La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty, is a statue given to the United States by France in 1885, standing at Liberty Island in the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Fort Wood was a star-shaped fortification on Bedloes Island (now Liberty Island). ...


The island is the property of the federal government and is operated by the National Park Service. It is accessible to the public only by ferry— either from Battery Park in Manhattan or Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey. It is separated from nearby Ellis Island by approximately 1 mi (1.6 km). The land is subjected to taxation by New Jersey.[citation needed] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Liberty State Park is a state park in Jersey City, New Jersey. ... Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


Liberty Island is 2000 feet (600 m) from Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey. By comparison it is 1-5/8 statute miles (2.6 kilometers) from Battery Park in Manhattan. The island has a land area of 59,558 square meters, or 14.717 acres, according to the United States Census Bureau. Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Since September 11, 2001, the island is guarded by round-the-clock patrols of the United States Coast Guard. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense, among other duties of coast guards elsewhere. ...

Contents

History

Liberty Island is one of several small islands in New York Harbor near the mouth of the Hudson River. Over it have flown the flags of the Netherlands, Great Britain, and the United States; and for a brief time it was lent to the French government. It had also belonged to the corporation of New York City, to the State, and to several private owners. Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


The Mohegan called it "Minnissais," meaning "lesser island." At various times it has been known as "Great Oyster," "Love Island," "Bedloo's Island," "Kennedy's Island," "Corporation Island," "Bedlow's Island" — an anglicized form of the original owner's name — and later "Bedloe’s," a spelling for which there is no historical basis. The Mohegans are a Native American tribe originally from southeastern Connecticut. ...


Under Dutch sovereignty the island became the property of Isaack Bedloo, merchant and "select burgher" of New Amsterdam, who was born in Calais, France. His name was listed with 94 others in the Remonstrance of the People of New Netherlands to the Director-General and Council, a protest of public-spirited citizens to the Netherlands against certain intolerable conditions. So it was not surprising that under English rule the island was formally granted to him by Governor Nicolls of New York. Burgher can refer to: A title. ... New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century town which grew outside of Fort Amsterdam on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614–1674) which was situated between 38 and 42 degrees latitude as a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic since 1624. ... This article is about the French city. ...


Bedloo is believed to have died in 1673. His estate retained the island until 1732, when his daughter Mary sold it to Adolphe Philipse and Henry Lane for 5 shillings. During their ownership the island was temporarily commandeered as the first quarantine station by the city, which feared "that small-pox and other malignant fevers may be brought in from South Carolina, Barbadoes, Antigua, and other places, where they have great mortality." Events January 22 - Impostor Mary Carleton is hanged in Newgate prison in England for multiple thefts and returning from penal transportation March 18 - John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton sells his part of New Jersey to the Quakers. ... Events February 23 - First performance of Handels Orlando, in London June 9 - James Oglethorpe is granted a royal charter for the colony of Georgia. ... Henry Smith Lane (February 24, 1811 - June 18, 1881) was an anti-slavery American politician who had the distinction of serving the shortest term (two days) of any Indiana Governor. ... The shilling (or informally: bob) was an English coin first issued in 1548 for Henry VIII, although arguably the testoon issued about 1487 for Henry VII was the first English shilling. ... Quarantine, a medical term (from Italian: quaranta giorni, forty days) is the act of keeping people or animals separated for a period of time before, for instance, allowing them to enter another country. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) was a highly contagious viral disease unique to humans. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35...


In 1746, Archibald Kennedy bought the island for the sum of 100 pounds, for use as a summer home. During his ownership the State ordered the erection of a beacon on Bedloe's Island, for the purpose of warning New Jersey, Connecticut, and New York of the approach of an enemy. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In 1756, the Governor of New York instructed Kennedy, as presiding councillor of New York, to exercise all possible precautions to prevent the introduction of smallpox, which was then raging in Philadelphia. Kennedy permitted the use of his island again as a temporary quarantine station. In 1759, the Corporation of the City of New York bought the island for 1,000 pounds to erect a pest-house. During the next few years it was leased to several different persons for varied periods of time. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


When the British occupied New York they seized Bedloe's Island and used it as a refuge for Tories. Objecting to this use, rebels managed to set fire to all the buildings on the island and to do other damage. The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ...


The French came into the picture in 1793, using Bedloe's Island as an isolation station for three years. In 1796, the island was conveyed to the ownership of the state of New York for use as a hospital site or any other desired purpose. 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ...


By this time steps had been taken by the newly organized American federal government, in conjunction with the state, to erect fortifications to protect New York Harbor. Three sites — Governors Island, Ellis Island, and Bedloe's Island — were chosen for defense fortifications, and on February 15, 1800, by act of the New York Legislature, the three islands were ceded to the United States government. This article is about Governors Island in New York State. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ...


Construction of a land battery, in the shape of an 11-point star, was begun on Bedloe's Island in 1806 and finished 5 years later. For a while referred to merely as the "works on Bedloe's Island," it later was named Fort Wood in memory of Lt. Colonel Eleazer Wood a distinguished hero of the War of 1812 who was killed in 1814 during an attack on Fort Erie. The word battery has a number of senses, most of which are discussed in articles cited below. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Eleazer D. Wood was an American Army officer in the War of 1812. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain Canadian colonial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson Isaac Brock† George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Fort Erie was the first British fort to be constructed as part of a network developed after the Seven Years War (or in North America the French and Indian War) was concluded by the Treaty of Paris (1763) at which time all of New France had been ceded to Great...


Following the War of 1812, Fort Wood served at various times as a corps of artillery garrison, ordinance depot, and recruiting station, and intermittently as a quarantine station.


Then came Frederic Auguste Bartholdi and his "great idea," and in 1877 Bedloe's Island was chosen as the site for the Statue of Liberty Illuminating the World. Although the island was then abandoned as a military post, it remained under the control of the War Department, with the exception of an acre (4,000 m²) or so at its north end which was set aside for the Lighthouse Board which operated the light in the torch. In 1901, the lighthouse reservation also was placed under War Department control. One of his works Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi (August 2, 1834 - October 4, 1904) was a French sculptor. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island Liberty Enlightening the World (La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty, is a statue given to the United States by France in 1885, standing at Liberty Island in the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1916 the island and the Statue of Liberty suffered extensive damage from the nearby Black Tom Explosion. 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Black Tom explosion of July 30, 1916 in Jersey City, New Jersey was an act of sabotage on American munition supplies by German agents to prevent the materials from being used by the Allies in World War I. // Black Tom Island, lying off a Jersey City pier. ...


In October 15, 1924 the Statue of Liberty was proclaimed a national monument. In 1933, the monument, up to the boundaries of old Fort Wood, was transferred to the Department of the Interior; in 1937, the army post was declared abandoned. From then through the present day the entire island fell under the purview of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


Part of the original fort is still on the site and serves as the base of the statue's monument. Fort Wood was finally closed in 1944 with the remaining garrison buildings demolished by 1950. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Relationship to New York and New Jersey

Panorama from Liberty Island, with views of Manhattan and Jersey City.
Panorama from Liberty Island, with views of Manhattan and Jersey City.

It is sometimes said by New Jersey boosters that "the Statue of Liberty is actually in New Jersey." (In one extreme example, a 1994 newspaper article quoted one Richard Boggiano of Jersey City as insisting that the proper street address of the Statue of Liberty is One Communipaw Avenue, Jersey City.) Such statements are incorrect. As noted above, Liberty Island has been owned by the federal government since 1800. It is within the territorial jurisdiction of the State of New York, a status that was reaffirmed by an 1834 compact between New York and New Jersey, and which has never been officially disputed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (6292x574, 1154 KB) Summary Picture taken by BigMac on September 9, 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (6292x574, 1154 KB) Summary Picture taken by BigMac on September 9, 2005. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The skyline of Jersey City, as seen from Lower New York Bay. ...


The belief that Liberty Island is "in" New Jersey could be a mistaken inference from three facts:

  • Liberty Island's proximity to Jersey City;
  • its appearance on maps on the New Jersey side of the state line;
  • New Jersey's victory in a 1998 lawsuit with New York over the ownership of parts of Ellis Island.

It is indisputable that Liberty Island is much closer to Jersey City than it is to New York City. One reminder of this is furnished by the special New Jersey license plate celebrating Liberty State Park in Jersey City, and featuring a picture of the Statue of Liberty. Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


It is also indisputable that maps draw the boundary between New Jersey and New York in the center of the Hudson River, with Liberty Island situated well on the New Jersey side of the line. The State of New Jersey in fact does retain the riparian rights to all the submerged land surrounding the statue, extending eastward to the boundary line. Perhaps a case can be made for language to the effect that Liberty Island is "geographically" within New Jersey's borders. But New Jersey has never claimed any legal rights to the dry land of Liberty Island. Also, according to the USGS, Liberty Island is located in New York's 8th Congressional District. Map New Yorks Eighth Congressional District district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City. ...


The islands of New York harbor have been part of New York since the issuance in 1664 of the colonial charter that created New Jersey (see charter text). This charter stated that New Jersey "bounded by the Hudson River" rather than from the middle channel, as was common in other colonial charters. That is, as everyone understood at the time, the New York-New Jersey border did not go through the center of the river channel as one might naturally assume. An 1834 compact between New York and New Jersey, which primarily concerned the status of Staten Island, set the boundary line between the States as the middle of the Hudson River but reaffirmed that Staten Island and the other islands belonged to New York. Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ...


The Ellis Island lawsuit concerned a special situation. Ellis Island is mostly constructed of artificial infill. New Jersey argued and the court agreed that the 1834 compact covered only the natural parts of the island, and not the portions added by infill. Thus it was agreed that the parts of the island made of filled land belonged to New Jersey while the original natural part belonged to New York. (This proved impractical to administer and New Jersey and New York subsequently agreed to share jurisdiction of the entire island). This special situation only applies to Ellis Island and part of Shooter's Island. The natural islands such as Staten Island, Liberty Island, and Prall's Island were not and are not in dispute.


Despite the legal details, some New Jersey residents feel aggrieved that the proximity of the Statue of Liberty to New Jersey is not well known to the general public. This is best understood as part of their wider complaint that "New Jersey gets no respect."[1]. Given the proximity of Liberty Island to Jersey City, it is understandable that Jersey City residents could be annoyed at the frequent association of the Statue of Liberty with New York City.


New Jersey provides all the utilities to both Ellis Island and Liberty Island, such as electricity, water, and sewage.

See also: Geography and environment of New York City

The geography and environment of New York City is characterized by its coastal position at the meeting of the Hudson River and the Atlantic Ocean in a naturally sheltered harbor. ...

References

  1. ^ Surveying New Jersey's diverse political landscape, CNN story; also, Harvard Crimson Let the 'Joizy' Jokes Begin "If the state of New Jersey were a comedian, it’d have to be Rodney Dangerfield—because it gets no respect"

See also

Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island Liberty Enlightening the World (La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty, is a statue given to the United States by France in 1885, standing at Liberty Island in the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor... This section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

v  d  e
Islands of New York City

Barren Island · The Blauzes · Broad Channel Island · Chimney Sweeps · City Island · Coney Island · Ellis Island · Governors Island · Hart Island · High Island · Hoffman Island · Hunters Island · Isle of Meadow · Liberty Island · Long Island · Manhattan · Mill Rock · North Brother Island · Prall's Island · Randall's Island · Rat Island · Rikers Island · Roosevelt Island · Shooters Island · South Brother Island · Staten Island · Swinburne Island · Twin Island · U Thant Island · Ward's Island Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Image File history File links Freiheitsstatue_NYC_full. ... Barren Island, was originally an island off the southern end of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, in Jamaica Bay just opposite the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens. ... The Blauzes are two tiny islands in City Island Harbor, off the northern tip of Hart Island. ... Broad Channel is a community / neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New York City. ... The Chimney Sweeps Islands, New York is a pair of tiny islands in the northern part of City Island Harbor. ... City Island is a small island approximately 1. ... Image of Coney Island, located in the middle left of the picture, taken by NASA. The peninsula to the right is Rockaway, Queens. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... This article is about Governors Island in New York State. ... Hart Island, sometimes referred to as Harts Island is a small uninhabited island in New York City at the western end of Long Island Sound. ... High Island is a small private island next to City Island. ... Aerial photo of Lower New York Bay, showing Hoffman and Swinburne islands. ... Hunters Island is a small island in northeast Bronx, New York. ... The Isle of Meadow, shown in red, along the western side of Staten Island The Isle of Meadow is a small uninhabited island in Staten Island, New York in the United States. ... Mercator projection of Long Island Long Island is an island in New York, USA. It has an area of 1,377 square miles (3567 km²) and a population of 7. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Mill Rock Island is a small island between Manhattan and Queens located south of Randalls and Wards Island where the East and Harlem rivers converge, in the U.S. state of New York. ... North Brother Island is an island in the East River situated between the Bronx and Rikers Island. ... Pralls Island, in the Arthur Kill, is shown in red Pralls Island is an uninhabited island in the Arthur Kill between Staten Island, New York, and Linden, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Randalls Island is situated in the East River in New York City. ... There is another Rat Island in Alaska. ... View of Rikers Island Rikers Island is the name of New York Citys largest jail facility, as well as the name of the 415 acre (1. ... Main Street on Roosevelt Island Roosevelt Island, pop. ... The eastern end of Shooters Island (background, forested) as seen from the waterfront of Staten Island Shooters Island is a small uninhabited island at the southern end of Newark Bay, along the north shore of Staten Island. ... South Brother Island is one of a pair of small islands in the East River situated between the Bronx and Rikers Island. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ... Swinburne Island hospital, 1879. ... Twin Island is a part of Pelham Bay Park, Bronx and is next to Hunters Island. ... U Thant Island, officially Belmont Island, is an island in the East River across from United Nations headquarters at 42nd Street on Manhattan in New York City. ... Wards Island is situated in the East River in New York City. ...

Coordinates: 40°41′N 74°03′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Liberty State Park - Statue of Liberty - Early History of the Island (733 words)
Liberty Island, one of a group of islands in New York Harbor near the mouth of the Hudson River, has had a long and interesting history.
Three sites-Governors Island, Ellis Island, and Bedloe's Island-were chosen for defense fortifications, and on February 15, 1800, by act of the New York Legislature, the three islands were ceded to the United States Government.
Although the fort was then abandoned as a military position, the island remained under the control of the War Department, with the exception of an acre or so at its north end which was set aside for the Lighthouse Board which operated the light in the torch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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