FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Liberal Democrats (UK)
Liberal Democrats
Lib Dem "Bird of Freedom" logo
Leader Charles Kennedy
Founded 1988
Headquarters 4 Cowley Street
London, SW1P 3NB
Political Ideology Liberalism
International Affiliation Liberal International
European Affiliation European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party
European Parliament Group Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe
Colours Gold
Website www.libdems.org.uk
See also Politics of the U.K.

Political parties
Elections Liberal Democrats Logo This is the logo and colophon of the Liberal Democrats (UK) political party. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7. ... This article discusses liberalism as a major political ideology as it developed and stands currently, rather than specific ideologies contained to specific countries. ... The Liberal International is an international organization for liberal parties. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, active in the European Union, uniting liberal and centrist parties around Europe which together represent more than 20 million European voters and is an international non-profit association incorporated under the laws of Belgium. ... ALDE logo The Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (French: Alliance des Démocrates et des Libéraux pour lEurope) is a Group in the European Parliament. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ...

The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. The party was formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the short lived Social Democratic Party (the two parties had already been in an alliance for some years). This article discusses liberalism as a major political ideology as it developed and stands currently, rather than specific ideologies contained to specific countries. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party to form a new party which would become known as... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a United Kingdom political party that existed as a national party between 1981 and 1990. ... The SDP-Liberal Alliance was an electoral alliance of the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party in the UK that ran from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats. ...


The party is led by Charles Kennedy. It is currently the third-largest party in the UK Parliament, behind Labour and the Conservatives, with 62 Members of Parliament elected at the general election of 2005. Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ...


In the Scottish Parliament it forms a coalition in the Scottish Executive with Labour, where it supplies Deputy First Minister, Nicol Stephen. The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... The term Scottish Executive is used in two distinct but closely related senses. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Nicol Stephen (born 23 March 1960) is Deputy First Minister of Scotland, leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, and a Member of the Scottish Parliament for Aberdeen South. ...


The Liberal Democrats claim they do not easily fit into the "left-right" political spectrum, but most political observers say the party has moved to the left since the war in Iraq, taking up 'Old Labour' issues such as higher taxation on high earners, higher levels of Government spending and extended enfranchisement (to 16-year-olds and, controversially, the imprisoned). Generally promoting politically and socially liberal policies, the Liberal Democrats describe themselves as being concerned with the use of power in British and international society. They are also wary of the powers of the state over individuals, and as a principle seek to minimise state intervention in personal affairs. Because of this the party took a strong stand against the British participation in the war in Iraq, and are considered the most pro-European party in British politics. The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ...


Economically, it is not a party founded on economic class interest, nor on explicit economic liberal doctrine (unlike some liberal parties in other countries); instead the party has historically combined a strong commitment to social justice, social provision and the welfare state with a strong belief in economic freedom and competitive markets wherever possible. The liberal theory of economics is the theory of economics described by classical liberal authors such as Adam Smith or the French Physiocrats. ... This is an overview of parties that adhere more or less (explicitly) to the ideas of political liberalism and is therefore a list of liberal parties around the world. ... Social Justice is a concept that has fascinated philosophers ever since Plato rebuked the young Sophist, Thrasymachus, for asserting that justice was whatever the strongest decided it would be. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...


Inside Liberal Democrats there exists also a market liberal wing aligned around the Liberal Future think tank. In 2005, after the general elections, the leader of the party, Charles Kennedy, promised a radical overhaul of Liberal Democrat policy and chose in his Shadow Cabinet several MPs who had contributed to the Orange Book, which offered free market solutions to several social issues. Many commentators interpreted this as a swing towards the market liberal direction. As a market-emphasized descendant of classical liberalism, market liberalism advocates full freedom of markets, without e. ... Liberal Future is a British market liberal think tank dedicated to the pursuit of encouraging new thinking amongst liberals both within and without the Liberal Democrats party. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The Liberal Democrats are the third-largest political party in the United Kingdom, and they have a team that acts, and styles itself, as a shadow cabinet. ... The Orange Book - Reclaiming Liberalism (ISBN 1861977972) is a book written by a group of prominent British Liberal Democrat politicians and edited by David Laws and Paul Marshall in 2004. ...

Contents


History of the Liberal Democrats

Founding

The Liberal Democrats are descended from the Liberal Party which dominated British politics for much of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party to form a new party which would become known as...


Having declined to third party status after the rise of the Labour Party in 1922, the Liberals found themselves challenged for their place as the centrist party of British politics in the 1980s, when in 1981, with the Labour Party moving to the left, a group of moderate Labour MPs broke away and established the Social Democratic Party (SDP), claiming to preserve previous Labour Party traditions. The SDP and the Liberals soon realised that there was no place for two centrist political parties, and entered into an alliance so that they would not stand against each other in elections. The two parties drew up their own policies and had different emphases, but produced a joint manifesto for the 1983 and 1987 General Elections. Initially the Alliance was led by David Steel (Liberal) and Roy Jenkins (SDP), and later by Steel and David Owen (SDP). The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The 1980s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1980 and 1989. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a United Kingdom political party that existed as a national party between 1981 and 1990. ... The SDP-Liberal Alliance was an electoral alliance of the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party in the UK that ran from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats. ... A manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. ... United Kingdom general election, 1983 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The UK general election, 1987 was held on June 11, 1987 and was the third victory in a row for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives. ... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood KT PC KBE (born March 31, 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... The Right Honourable David Anthony Llewellyn Owen, Baron Owen, CH , PC , MD (born July 2, 1938), is a British politician. ...


In 1987, following disappointing results in that year's general election, Steel proposed a merger of the two parties. Although opposed by David Owen, it was supported by a majority of members of each and the two parties formally merged in 1988, with David Steel and Robert Maclennan (who had become SDP leader in August 1987) as interim joint leaders. At the time of the merger, in 1988, the party took the name Social and Liberal Democrats (SLD). After briefly shortening its name to The Democrats, it changed to the current name of Liberal Democrats in October 1989, which is now frequently shortened to "Lib Dems". 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Adam Ross Maclennan, Baron Maclennan of Rogart, PC (born June 26, 1936), educated at Balliol College, Oxford, is a British Liberal Democrat politician. ...


The minority of the SDP who rejected the merger remained under David Owen's leadership. Some Liberals disliked the direction the party was going in after Paddy Ashdown's election as leader and created a new party which revived the name "Liberal Party". The Right Honourable Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, KBE, PC ( born 27 February 1941 ), invariably known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1988 until 1999. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ...


Post-1988 history

Charles Kennedy, Lib Dem leader
Charles Kennedy, Lib Dem leader

The former Liberal MP Ashdown became leader of the party in 1988, and under his leadership the party's support grew steadily. Although the Lib Dems did not immediately manage to repeat the 20%+ shares of national vote which had been achieved in the 1980s, they did manage to more than double their representation in Parliament at the 1997 General Election to 46 seats, and become a major force in local government throughout the decade. used with permission courtesey of the Liberal Democrats - see Wikipedia:Pictures from libdems. ... used with permission courtesey of the Liberal Democrats - see Wikipedia:Pictures from libdems. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ...


Following Tony Blair's election as leader of the Labour Party in 1994, Ashdown controversially pursued a policy of cooperation between the two parties (with the two leaders even allegedly agreeing to form a coalition government). However this Lib-Lab Pact failed to materialise when it became apparent to the Liberal Democrats that Labour would not introduce proportional representation and other key Liberal Democrat demands. Labour's massive majority after the 1997 general election also meant that Blair lost interest in pursuing the issue, and some senior Labour politicians (e.g. John Prescott) were strongly opposed to a coalition. The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... Lib-Lab Pact has been the term used to describe a working arrangement between the UKs political parties of the Liberals (later Liberal Democrats) and the Labour Party. ... Proportional representation (PR) is an election system which ensures a proportionally representative result of a democratic election, x% of votes should be represented by x% in the democratic institutions, parliament or congress. ... John Prescott The Right Honourable John Leslie Prescott (born May 31, 1938) is a British Labour Party politician who is presently Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and First Secretary of State. ...


Ashdown retired as leader in 1999 and was replaced by Charles Kennedy, originally the only SDP MP fully supporting the merger. The party improved on their 1997 results at the 2001 general election, winning more seats and improving on their vote percentage. 1999 (MCMXCIX) is a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ...


In recent times the Liberal Democrats have won support due to their opposition to the war on Iraq, and Charles Kennedy has expressed his intention for his party to replace the Conservatives as the main opposition. The party won seats from Labour in by-elections in Brent East (2003) and Leicester South in 2004, and narrowly missed taking others in Birmingham Hodge Hill and Hartlepool. The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The member of Parliament for Brent East, Paul Daisley, of the Labour Party died on June 18, 2003. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leicester South constituency, shown within Leicester. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hodge Hill constituency shown within Birmingham A by-election was held for the United Kingdom Parliament seat of Birmingham Hodge Hill, on July 15, the same day as the Leicester South by-election. ... Location of Hartlepool constituency On July 23, 2004, the Member of Parliament for Hartlepool, Peter Mandelson (Labour), was nominated as Britains new European Commissioner. ...


However the Liberal Democrats are currently engaged in a debate on their future national direction. The party's increased support in recent years has come from both former Labour and former Conservative voters, due to the Lib Dems' positions on issues that unite the Labour left with liberal Conservatives: civil liberties, electoral reform, the War in Iraq and matters of trust and open government. However, whilst these two groups of potential supporters might agree with the party on these 'Lib Dem issues' (and disagree with the perceived authoritarianism of the government and main opposition), matters of economic policy present an obvious gap between the two groups that the party are still debating how and whether to bridge. Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ... Electoral reform projects seek to change the way that public desires are reflected in elections through electoral systems. ... There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ...


At the 2005 general election, the Liberal Democrats gained their highest share of the vote since the days of the SDP-Liberal Alliance, and picked up 62 seats (their highest since 1923). However, many had anticipated that this election would prove to be the Lib Dem's great breakthrough at Westminster, with some party activists even hoping to reach 100 MPs. From this perspective, 2005 could be considered a wasted opportunity for the Liberal Democrats, although many commentators point to the unfairness of an electoral system that lets the party pick up around one-quarter of the total votes but only one-tenth of the parliamentary seats. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The SDP-Liberal Alliance was an electoral alliance of the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party in the UK that ran from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ...


One of the more interesting trends observed at the election was the Lib Dems replacing the Conservatives as Labour's main opponents in many urban areas. Many of the party's gains came in previously Labour-held urban constituencies (e.g. Manchester Withington, Cardiff Central, Birmingham Yardley), and the party also notably achieved over 100 second-place finishes behind Labour candidates. The long-term implications of this trend in British politics could be profound, since the British electoral system makes it nearly impossible for the Conservatives to return a government without winning some city seats (such as the now Lib Dem Bristol West constituency, which the Tories held until 1997, but where they are now coming third). This trend also strengthens the Lib Dems claims to be "the real alternative" to the incumbent Labour government. Manchester Withington is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Cardiff Central is a parliamentary constituency for the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Welsh Assembly. ... Yardley constituency shown within Birmingham Birmingham Yardley is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Bristol West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Electoral results

In post-war United Kingdom general elections they have emerged as the third most popular party behind Labour and the Conservatives. In most recent elections, the Liberal Democrats (or their precursor Alliance) have gained between 15% and 25% of the national vote. United Kingdom general elections are the elections held when the Members of Parliament (MPs) forming the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom are elected. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ...

Election Name Share of Votes Seats
1945 Liberal Party 9.0% 12
1950 Liberal Party 9.1% 9
1951 Liberal Party 2.5% 6
1955 Liberal Party 2.7% 6
1959 Liberal Party 5.9% 6
1964 Liberal Party 11.2% 9
1966 Liberal Party 8.6% 12
1970 Liberal Party 7.5% 6
1974 Liberal Party 19.3% 14
1974 Liberal Party 18.3% 13
1979 Liberal Party 13.8% 11
1983 SDP-Liberal Alliance 25.4% 23
1987 SDP-Liberal Alliance 22.6% 22
1992 Liberal Democrats 17.8% 20
1997 Liberal Democrats 16.8% 46
2001 Liberal Democrats 18.3% 52
2005 Liberal Democrats 22.0% 62

The British first past the post electoral system does not reward parties whose vote is evenly divided across the nation with many seats in Parliament, and the Liberal Democrats and their forerunners have suffered in particular. This was especially true in 1983 and 1987 when their popular electoral support was greatest; their increase in the number of seats in 1997 and 2001 was largely due to the weakness of the Conservative Party in the later elections. The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th century. ... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ... The UK general election, 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... United Kingdom general election, 1983 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The UK general election, 1987 was held on June 11, 1987 and was the third victory in a row for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The First Past the Post electoral system, is a voting system for single-member districts. ...


The Liberal Democrats have generally performed better in local elections, and are a more significant force in local government, with 27 councils under Liberal Democrat majority control, and Lib Dems in joint control of many others. They have generally performed more poorly in elections to the European Parliament: for example in elections on 10 June 2004, the LibDem national share of the vote was 29% (giving them second place, ahead of Labour) in the local elections that day but only 15% in the simultaneous European elections (putting them in fourth place behind the United Kingdom Independence Party). The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elections to the European Parliament were held from June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004 in the 25 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ...


They have been coalition partners with Labour in the Scottish Parliament since its re-establishment in 1999, and were also in coalition with Labour in the National Assembly for Wales from 1999 to 2003. The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) is a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Lib-Lab Pact has been the term used to describe a working arrangement between the UKs political parties of the Liberals (later Liberal Democrats) and the Labour Party. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ideology

The Liberal Democrats claim that their ideology is about giving "power to the people"


The Liberal Democrats state they are fundamentally against the undemocratic concentration of power in unaccountable bodies. They propose radical decentralisation of power, out of Westminster and into the hands of the people. They would also create a system of tiered government structures to make decisions at what they see as the appropriate level, including regional assemblies, the European Union, and international organisations.


In keeping with the principle of decentralisation of power, the Liberal Democrats are keen protectors of civil liberties and oppose intervention of the state in personal affairs. For this reason, the Liberal Democrats are popular amongst gay rights campaigners and campaigners for the decriminalisation of recreational drugs. Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ...


Their opponents point to their support for the European Convention on Human Rights, even when its theories on separation of powers leads to more power being given to judges and regulatory bodies rather than elected politicians. They point to the Lib Dem desire for local decision making, and their complaints that different decisions in different locations can lead to a "postcode lottery" in the provision of public services. They also express surprise that the Lib Dems are so supportive of the European Union, even when that results in decisions being taken at a higher rather than a lower level. They are also criticised for not calling for reform of the European parliament despite the fact that different countries are not represented equally, which contradicts their ideology of 'giving power to the people'. The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights, was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... Separation of powers is a model of democracy that involves the separation of political power between 3 branches of the state: The Executive, the Legislature, and the Judiciary. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... Pro-European is a subjective term applied to a person who supports the European Union (EU) and/or further European integration, specifically in the context of political argument over the current and future status of the EU and its policies. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ...


Left wing or right wing?

Since the governments of Herbert Henry Asquith and David Lloyd George the Liberal Democrats and their precursor Liberal party have been seen as the centrist party of British politics. However, with Tony Blair's repositioning of Labour towards the right, some now view the Lib Dems as being the most left-wing of Britain's mainstream parties and many classify the Lib Dems as centre left. Lib Dems opposed the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, although they were the strongest advocates of the Kosovo War and before that, intervention in Bosnia. They favour a higher top rate of tax, but have also advocated 'pro-market' policies such as post office privatization and banning strikes in emergency services. The Right Honourable Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852–15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... The Right Honourable David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... In politics, the centre left of the political spectrum roughly comprises European social democrats, progressive liberals and moderate greens. ... The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... This is the history of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or, especially in India, disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership and/or transferring the management of a service or activity from the government to the private sector. ... Emergency services are public services that deal with emergencies and other aspects of Public Safety. ...


Some claim that attempting to place the Liberal Democrats within the 'left wing'-'right wing' model does not accurately represent their ideology. For example, when Lib Dems oppose the power of the trade unions, they are seen as right wing. When they oppose the power of the corporations, they are seen as left wing. Whilst these positions are consistent with an opposition to unaccountable power, it is sometimes argued that they do not fit well inside the left-right axis of 20th century British politics. Left-Right politics are traditional terms that represent a broad dialectical interpretation of diverse and competing political viewpoints. ... Sociologists usually define power as the ability to impose ones will on others, even if those others resist in some way. ...


However, others argue that these positions are consistent with both 20th and 21st century British politics, which is in turn a valid example of the traditional left-right spectrum of political analysis. When the Lib Dems oppose the trade unions, they do so from the centre of the political spectrum with the trade unions being to the left of them. When the Lib Dems oppose the power of the large corporations, they still do this from the centre of the political spectrum with the difference being that the corporations are to the right of them. According to this view, liberalism or political centrism is consistent with a left-right analysis of politics, and denial of this is to claim that we live in a post-modern world where nothing can ever be known and nothing is as it seems. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In regard to the claim that the Lib Dems are to the left of New Labour, this is borne of the fact that the New Labour hierarchy have deliberately courted Conservative voters and even Conservative politicians on the basis that if they take the centre ground from the other parties, they gain power. They do this in the knowledge that their own core voters have nowhere realistic to the left of Labour to turn, so the Lib Dems have tried to accommodate these people to a degree (e.g. celebrity "Marxist" Tariq Ali implored Londoners to vote Lib Dem before the 2005 general election over the Iraq war). However, this has led to massive voter disillusionment and the lowest percentage General Election turnouts in the last two elections (2001 and 2005) since universal suffrage in the 1930s. This is mainly caused by previous Labour voters staying at home. This shift in the political direction of Labour was begun in the 1980s but accelerated by the catastrophic fourth election defeat in a row in 1992. Tariq Ali Tariq Ali (born 1943) is an author, filmmaker, and historian. ...


There was a discussion in the Lib Dems at their conference in September 2005 as to whether the social liberal ideals have taken them as far as they can go, and whether they should now move back to the right in order to court Tory voters. This would involve things like abolishing their policy of a 50% tax rate for those who earn over £100,000. Policies like these make for bad publicity with the Tory press who cater for the middle-class voters of middle England. It is these people who the Lib Dems must appeal to if they are to fulfil their ambition of becoming the new opposition to a Labour government. Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Atlantic hurricane season • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Bali bombings investigation • California wildfires • UK Conservative Party leadership election • DeLay political financing scandal • Dengue outbreak in Singapore • Fuel prices / Peak oil • Harriet Miers nomination and hearings • Hurricane Wilma • Irans nuclear program • Kashmir earthquake • London bombings...


Unfortunately for the Lib Dems, ideological disputes aside, it is likely they will only ever see power if a proportional representation voting system is brought in, where they would be in a permanent coalition with Labour. This is the arrangement that Paddy Ashdown agreed with Tony Blair before the 1997 election, until Blair discovered he could win huge landslide victories under first-past-the-post without any need for sharing power with the Lib Dems. Proportional representation (PR) is an election system which ensures a proportionally representative result of a democratic election, x% of votes should be represented by x% in the democratic institutions, parliament or congress. ... The Right Honourable Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, KBE, PC ( born 27 February 1941 ), invariably known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1988 until 1999. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ...


Policies

The Liberal Democrats' constitution speaks of "a fair, free and open society, in which we seek to balance the fundamental values of liberty, equality and community, and in which no-one shall be enslaved by poverty, ignorance or conformity. We champion the freedom, dignity and well-being of individuals". To this end:

  • They support civil liberties, and have opposed the more authoritarian of Labour's anti-terror laws (e.g. detention without trial).
  • They support more open government, including substantial reforms to increase parliamentary oversight of the executive.
  • They are federalists and support the decentralisation of power to the lowest possible level.
  • They support "free education for all" and propose to abolish university tuition fees and set up a system of Government grants for university students.
  • They propose a substantial non-means tested increase in pensions.
  • They are in favour of a new 50% rate of income tax on incomes over £100,000 per year, the revenue from which would be used to abolish tuition fees, restore student maintenance grants and provide free personal care throughout the UK; the balance would be used to keep the rate of local taxation down.
  • They support anti-discrimination laws. So far 24 Lib Dem MPs have signed EDM710 calling on the government to extend the protections for religious groups, in respect of discrimination in the provisions of goods, facilities and services, to lesbians and gay men.
  • They are in favour of introducing a local income tax in place of the current council tax, which is collected based on the value of the taxpayer's house.
  • They are in favour of full UK participation in the European Union and an early referendum on joining the Euro, which they support.
  • They are in favour of proportional representation for elections to both the House of Commons and a second chamber to replace the House of Lords, preferably by the STV system.

The most well-known Liberal Democrat policy for most of the 1990s was to increase the basic rate of income tax by one percentage point to fund key public services (especially education). This proposal was recently abandoned after Tony Blair's Labour government increased national insurance contributions by the same amount, a policy with much the same effect. Their current fiscal policies aim at increasing the top rate of income tax by 10 percentage points to 50% for those earning over £100,000 to fund their increased public spending plans, and to replace Council Tax with local income taxes. In 2003 the Liberal Democrats started to make their long-held pledge to abolish Council Tax a centrepiece of their campaign. Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ... The Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 or ATCSA is a British Act of Parliament introduced as emergency legislation after the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York. ... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... The term federalist can refer to different ideologies, depending on the locale. ... // History Because of the above definition, the oldest universities in the world were all European, as the awarding of academic degrees was not a custom of older institutions of learning in Asia and Africa. ... Top-up fees (not their official name) are a new way of charging tuition to undergraduate and PGCE students who study at universities in the United Kingdom from the 2006-2007 academic year onwards. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... The Council Tax is the main form of local taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. ... The euro (symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Proportional representation (PR) is an election system which ensures a proportionally representative result of a democratic election, x% of votes should be represented by x% in the democratic institutions, parliament or congress. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... National insurance is a system of taxes, and related social security benefits, that has operated in the United Kingdom since its introduction in 1911, and wider extension by the government of Clement Attlee in 1946. ... The Council Tax is the main form of local taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. ...


In relation to the 2003 Iraq war, the Liberal Democrats opposed UK participation prior to the conflict, but stated that they would support UK forces that had been ordered to fight while it was taking place. After the initial military action was completed, they renewed their political opposition. The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 comprising United States and United Kingdom forces (98%), and several other nations. ...


The period after 2001 saw an internal discussion about the right policies for the party on economics and public spending, with some party members advocating that the party position itself as a defender of the traditional welfare state in order to gain support from those who had previously voted Labour. Others, most notably Mark Oaten, advocated a stance in favour of smaller government and laissez-faire (the "Orange Book" published in 2004 was an example of this wing of the Liberal discussion). The party announced its policy of abolishing the Department for Trade and Industry in 2004. 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Mark Oaten Mark Oaten (born 8 March 1964) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for Winchester constituency. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... The Orange Book - Reclaiming Liberalism (ISBN 1861977972) is a book written by a group of prominent British Liberal Democrat politicians and edited by David Laws and Paul Marshall in 2004. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ...


Current party policies can be found on the party website:

  • Most recent manifesto (external link)
  • Detailed policy papers (external link)

The Liberal Democrats are a member party of the Liberal International and the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party and their 12 MEPs form part of the ALDE group in the European Parliament. The Liberal International is an international organization for liberal parties. ... The European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party (founded in 1993) is a liberal party, active in the European Union, uniting liberal and centrist parties around Europe which together represent more than 20 million European voters and is an international non-profit association incorporated under the laws of Belgium. ... ALDE logo The Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (French: Alliance des Démocrates et des Libéraux pour lEurope) is a Group in the European Parliament. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ...


Green liberalism

Green Liberalism is a term used to refer to liberals who have incorporated green concerns into their ideology. Within the Liberal Democrats, this trend is represented by the Green Liberal Democrats. Green Liberalism is a term used to refer to liberal who have incorporated green concerns into their ideology. ... In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. ... Green politics is a body of political ideas informed by environmentalism aimed at developing a sustainable society. ... An ideology is a collection of ideas. ...


Internal Factions

Broadly speaking, Liberal Democrats can be classified into two main political factions:


Social liberals have dominated the party since its formation in 1988. Drawing inspiration from the likes of David Lloyd George, William Beveridge and John Maynard Keynes, individuals from this wing of the party are keen advocates of the welfare state and of government regulation to protect consumers, employees and the environment. As with any form of liberalism, support for civil liberties and human rights are also key to the social liberal outlook. Modern examples of social liberals within the parliamentary party include Menzies Campbell, Paul Holmes and Norman Baker. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with American Liberalism. ... The Right Honourable David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... William Henry Beveridge (March 5, 1879-1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ... John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes of Tilton (pronounced kānz / kAnze), ) (June 5, 1883 – April 21, 1946) was an English economist, whose ideas had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on American and British fiscal policies. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Menzies Campbell The Right Honourable Sir Walter Menzies Campbell, CBE, QC (born 22 May 1941) is a Scottish advocate and the Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for North East Fife. ... Paul Holmes could refer to: Paul Robert Holmes, Liberal Democrat MP for Chesterfield. ... Norman John Baker (born 26 July 1957, Aberdeen, Scotland) is the Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for Lewes, in the United Kingdom. ...


The libertarian wing of the party share with the social liberals a belief in freedom. However, whereas the social liberals often argue in favour of positive liberty (using the power of the state to enhance the freedoms of its citizens), libertarians take a laissez-faire approach to the economy which emphasises negative liberty. This often manifests itself as support for greater economic freedom, causing some tension between the two wings of the party. The two leading libertarians within the modern party are Mark Oaten and Vincent Cable. Many commentators have argued that the senior positions held by these two MPs has led to a 'rightwards' shift in Lib Dem thinking in recent years, though it should be noted that party leader Charles Kennedy (and the majority of the party membership) are closer to the social liberal position. This article deals with the libertarianism as defined in America and several other nations. ... Positive liberty, essentially identical with the concept of positive right, an idea that was first expressed and analyzed as a separate conception of liberty by John Stuart Mill but most notably described by Isaiah Berlin, refers to the ability to act to fulfill ones own potential, as opposed to... The philosophical concept of negative liberty is the absence of coercion from others. ... Mark Oaten Mark Oaten (born 8 March 1964) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for Winchester constituency. ... Vincent Cable Dr (John) Vincent Cable (born 9 May 1943, York) is a British Liberal Democrat politician and economist. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ...


It is easy to characterise these two wings of the party as consisting of former SDP members and former Liberal Party members respectively. However, many prominent social liberals (including Menzies Campbell and Paddy Ashdown) were actually former Liberal MPs, whereas the two most prominent libertarians (Mark Oaten and Vincent Cable) both came to the Liberal Democrats from the SDP. Menzies Campbell The Right Honourable Sir Walter Menzies Campbell, CBE, QC (born 22 May 1941) is a Scottish advocate and the Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for North East Fife. ... The Right Honourable Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, KBE, PC ( born 27 February 1941 ), invariably known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1988 until 1999. ... Mark Oaten Mark Oaten (born 8 March 1964) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for Winchester constituency. ... Vincent Cable Dr (John) Vincent Cable (born 9 May 1943, York) is a British Liberal Democrat politician and economist. ...


Structure

The Liberal Democrats are a federal party comprising the state parties of Wales, Scotland and England. Scotland and England are further split into regional parties. There are a number of Specified Associated Organisations (SAOs), representing particular groupings such as Ethnic Minorities (EMLD), Women (WLD), LGBT people (Delga), Youth & Student (LDYS), Trade Unionists (ALDTU), Engineers & Scientists (ALDES), Parliamentary Candidates (PCA) and Local Councillors (ALDC) which formally review and input to party policy. Other groups can become Associated Organisations (AOs) as pressure groups within the party. Delga is the LGBT organisation of the British Liberal Democrats political party, the full name being Liberal Democrats for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Action. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... PCA may stand for: Pacific Coast Academy (Zoey 101) Parti Communiste Algérien (Algerian Communist Party) Partido Comunista de Andalucía (Communist Party of Andalusia) Partido Comunista de Aragón (Communist Party of Aragon) Partido Comunista de la Argentina (Communist Party of Argentina) Pacific Coast Academy, the fictional school in...


The Liberal Democrats, like the Conservatives, organise in Northern Ireland. However, unlike the Conservatives, the Lib Dems have chosen not to contest elections in the province. Instead, they have opted to work with the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland, with the de facto agreement that the Liberal Democrats will support the Alliance Party in elections. Indeed, many individuals, including several notable parliamentarians, hold membership of both parties. Alliance members of the House of Lords take the Liberal Democrat whip on non-Northern Ireland issues, and the Alliance Party always maintains a stall set out at the Liberal Democrat Party Conference. The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


See also

This article discusses liberalism as a major political ideology as it developed and stands currently, rather than specific ideologies contained to specific countries. ... This is an (partial) overview of individuals that contributed to the development of liberal theory on a worldwide scale and therefore are strongly associated with the liberal tradition and instrumental in the exposition of political liberalism as a philosophy. ... This article discusses liberalism as a major political current in specific regions and countries. ... This is an overview of parties that adhere more or less (explicitly) to the ideas of political liberalism and is therefore a list of liberal parties around the world. ... Liberal democracy is a form of representative democracy where the ability of elected representatives to exercise decision-making power is subject to the rule of law and moderated by a constitution which emphasizes the protection of the rights and freedoms of individuals and minorities (also called constitutional democracy and constitutional... This article gives an overview of liberalism in the United Kingdom. ... Liberal Democrat Youth and Students (LDYS) are the youth and student group of the UK Liberal Democrats. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... Federalism is the idea of a group or body of members that are bound together (latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... Community politics is a movement in British politics to re-engage people with political action on a local level. ... EARS, the Election Agents Retrieval System, is a piece of electoral software used primarily by the Liberal Democrats to record canvassing statistics, plan polling day action and predict election results using the Richmond formula. ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a United Kingdom political party that existed as a national party between 1981 and 1990. ... The Glee Club is a traditional event in the Liberal Assembly and UK Liberal Democrat party conference, consisting of a public singing around a piano. ... The Land is a protest song, traditionally sung by the Georgist movement in pursuit and promotion of Land Value Taxation. ... The Beveridge Group is a centre-left ginger group within the Liberal Democrat party in the UK. It was set up in 2001 by MPs Alistair Carmichael, Paul Holmes, John Barrett and John Pugh to promote debate within the party regarding public service provision. ...

Leaders of the Liberal Democrats, 1988-Present

David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood KT PC KBE (born March 31, 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... Robert Adam Ross Maclennan, Baron Maclennan of Rogart, PC (born June 26, 1936), educated at Balliol College, Oxford, is a British Liberal Democrat politician. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, KBE, PC ( born 27 February 1941 ), invariably known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1988 until 1999. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) is a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ...

Frontbench: "Shadow cabinet"

See Liberal Democrat Shadow Cabinet. The Liberal Democrats are the third-largest political party in the United Kingdom, and they have a team that acts, and styles itself, as a shadow cabinet. ...


External links

  • Liberal Democrats official site

Party sub-organisations

Historical information

Category listings

Miscellaneous

Political Parties in the United Kingdom
Represented in the House of Commons:

Labour (356) | Conservatives (198) | Liberal Democrats (62) | DUP (9) | SNP (6) | Sinn Féin (5) | Plaid Cymru (3) | SDLP (3) | UUP (1) | IKHH (1) | Respect (1) Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-07-12, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ...

Represented in the Scottish Parliament:

Labour (50) | SNP (26) | Conservative and Unionists (17) | Liberal Democrats (17) | Scottish Green Party (7) | Scottish Socialist Party (6) | Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (1) The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish Green Party is the Green party in Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... This article deals with the Scottish Socialist Party that was formed in 1998. ... The Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (SSCUP) were formed in February 2003, in time to contest that years elections to the Scottish Parliament. ...

Represented in the Welsh Assembly:

Labour (29) | Plaid Cymru (12) | Conservatives (11) | Liberal Democrats (6) | Forward Wales (1) This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-07-12, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Forward Wales (or Cymru Ymlaen in Welsh) is a political party operating in Wales. ...

Represented in the Northern Ireland Assembly (suspended):

DUP (33) | UUP (24) | Sinn Féin (24) | SDLP (18) | Alliance Party (6) | UK Unionist Party (1) | Progressive Unionist Party (1) The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) are a small political party from Northern Ireland. ...

Represented in the European Parliament:

Conservative (27) | Labour (19) | Liberal Democrats (12) | UKIP (10) | Green Party of England and Wales (2) | SNP (2) | Plaid Cymru (1) | DUP (1) | UUP (1) | Sinn Féin (1) The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... The Green Party of England and Wales emerged as a distinct party in the 1990s. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-07-12, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ...

Minor parties:

British National Party | Veritas | Socialist Labour | Liberal | English Democrats The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far-right in the United Kingdom. ... Veritas is a United Kingdom political party, formed in 2005 as a split from the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP). ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is a political party in England, which seeks the establishment of a Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Liberal Democrats (UK) (1461 words)
The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom.
The SDP-Liberal Alliance was an electoral alliance of the Social Democratic Party and the Liberal Party in the UK that ran from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats.
It is currently the third-largest party in the UK Parliament, behind Labour and the Conservatives, with 62 Members of Parliament elected at the general election of 2005.
Liberal Democrats (UK) - definition of Liberal Democrats (UK) in Encyclopedia (2625 words)
The Liberal Democrats' constitution speaks of "a fair, free and open society, in which we seek to balance the fundamental values of liberty, equality and community, and in which no-one shall be enslaved by poverty, ignorance or conformity.
The Liberal Democrats are a member party of the Liberal International and the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party and their 12 MEPs form part of the ALDE group in the European Parliament.
Green Liberalism accepts that the natural world is a system in a state of flux, and does not seek to conserve the natural world as it is. However, it does seek to minimise the damage done by the human species on the natural world, and to aid the regeneration of damaged areas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m