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Encyclopedia > Liberal Democratic Party (Japan)
自由民主党
Jiyū-Minshutō
Liberal Democratic Party
Liberal Democratic Party Logo
President Shinzo Abe
Secretary General Hidenao Nakagawa
Councilors Leader Mikio Aoki
Representatives Leader Takeshi Noda
Founded November 15, 1955
Headquarters 1-11-23 Nagata-cho
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
Japan
Political ideology Liberal conservatism, center-right
International affiliation None
Color(s) Blue and Green (informally)
Number of Councilors 83
Number of Representatives 307
Website Liberal Democratic Party (Japan)

The Liberal Democratic Party (自由民主党 Jiyū-Minshutō?), frequently abbreviated to LDP or Jimintō (自民党?), is a conservative political party and the largest party in Japan. It has ruled for most of the years since its founding in 1955. It is not to be confused with the now-defunct Liberal Party (自由党 Jiyūtō?), which merged with the Democratic Party of Japan, the main opposition party, in November 2003. re-uploading as PNG was sunkids. ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... Mikio Aoki (青木幹雄) is a Japanese politician. ... Takeshi Noda is a member of the Liberal Democratic Party and (as of June 2004) of the House of Representatives of Japan in the Japanese Diet. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... National Diet Building, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Yasukuni Shrine, Kudan Kita 3-1-1, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Otemon, the Great Gate of Edo Castle (Kokyo) Chiyoda (千代田区; -ku) is a special ward in central Tokyo, Japan. ...   , literally Eastern capital) is a unique subnational administrative region of Japan with characteristics of both a prefecture and a city. ... Liberal conservatism is a variant of conservatism that combines the classical conservative concern for established tradition, respect for authority and (sometimes) religious values with liberal ideas, especially on economic issues (see economic liberalism, which advocates free market capitalism). ... The term center-right has two distinct meanings in politics: Center-right can be used to describe a moderately right-wing political party. ... YOU SUCK!!!!! ... Mossy, green fountain in Wattens, Austria. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Liberal Party (in Japanese Jiyu-to) was a former Japanese and liberal party formed in 1998 by Ichiro Ozawa and Hirohisa Fujii. ... The Democratic Party of Japan ) is a liberal party in Japan. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ...


After a striking victory in the Japan general election, 2005, the LDP holds an absolute majority in the Japanese House of Representatives and has formed a coalition government with the New Komeito Party. Shinzo Abe succeeded then-Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi as the president of the party on September 20, 2006. For a breakdown of the results by block district with maps, see Results of Japan general election, 2005 Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on 11 September 2005, about two years before the end of the term... The House of Representatives ) is the lower house of the Diet of Japan. ... The New Komeito ), New Komeito Party , or NKP is a political party in Japan founded by Daisaku Ikeda, leader of the Buddhist organization Soka Gakkai. ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Contents

History

The LDP was formed in 1955 as a party merger between Japan's two oppositional parties, the Liberal Party (自由党 Jiyutō?, 1950–1955, Led by Shigeru Yoshida) and the Japan Democratic Party (日本民主党 Nihon Minshutō?, 1954–1955, Led by Ichirō Hatoyama), both right-wing conservative parties, as a united front against the then popular Japan Socialist Party. The party won the following elections, and Japan's first conservative government with a majority was formed by 1955. It would hold majority government until 1993. Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Liberal Party (自由党 Jiyuto) is the name of five different political parties in different time periods in Japan. ... This is a Japanese name; the family name is Yoshida Shigeru Yoshida ), September 22, 1878–October 20, 1967, was a Japanese diplomat and politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 1946 to 1947 and from 1948 to 1954. ... Ichirō Hatoyama (鳩山 一郎 Hatoyama Ichirō, January 1, 1883–March 7, 1959) was a Japanese politician and the 52nd, 53rd and 54th Prime Minister of Japan, serving terms from December 10, 1954 to March 19, 1955, from then to November 22, 1955, and from then to December 23, 1956. ... The Japan Socialist Party (日本社会党) (in Japanese Nihon Shakai-to) was a former Japanese political party with a socialist, left-wing ideology, which functioned between 1945 and 1996. ...


The LDP began with reforming Japan's foreign affairs, ranging from entry into the United Nations, to establishing diplomatic ties with the Soviet Union. Its leaders in the 1950s also made the LDP the main government party, and in all the elections of the 1950s, the LDP won the majority vote, with the only other opposition coming from the left-wing, made up of the Japan Socialist Party and the Japanese Communist Party. This article is about a journal. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Japanese Communist Party or Japan Communist Party (JCP) (in Japanese 日本共産党, Nihon Kyōsan-tō) is a political party in Japan. ...


From the 1950s through the 1970s, the American Central Intelligence Agency spent millions of dollars attempting to influence elections in Japan to favor the LDP against more leftist parties such as the Socialists and the Communists, although this was not revealed until the mid-1990s when The New York Times exposed it. [1] The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an intelligence agency of the United States government. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


For the majority of the 1960s, the LDP (and Japan) were led by Eisaku Sato, beginning with the hosting of the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, and ending in 1972 with Japanese neutrality in the Vietnam War and with the beginning of the Japanese asset price bubble. By the end of the 1970s, the LDP went into its decline, where even though it held the reins of government many scandals plagued the party, while the opposition (now joined with the Komeito (Former)) gained momentum. This article or section needs to be updated. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Inflation-adjusted house prices in Japan (1980–2005) compared to house price appreciation the United States, Britain, and Australia (1995–2005). ... The Komeito (公明党), also known as Clean Government Party or CGP, was a political party in Japan. ...


In 1976, in the wake of the Lockheed bribery scandal, a handful of younger LDP Diet members broke away and established their own party, the New Liberal Club (Shin Jiyu Kurabu). A decade later, however, it was reabsorbed by the LDP. Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lockheed Scandal of 1976 involved political donations paid by the American aircraft manufacturer Lockheed to Japanese politicians in return for aid in selling planes to All Nippon Airways. ...


By the late 1970s, the Japan Socialist Party, the Japanese Communist Party, and the Komeito along with the international community used major pressure to have Japan switch diplomatic ties from the Republic of China to the People's Republic of China. During the 1980s, the LDP was responsible for Japan's unprecedented economic growth, and the successful economy. In the end of the decade, Japan also played a pivotal role in ending the Cold War.[citation needed] Motto none Anthem National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital Taipei (formerly and de jure Nanking) Largest city Taipei Official languages Standard Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Government Semi-presidential system  -  President Chen Shui-bian  -  Vice President Annette Lu  -  Premier Chang Chun-hsiung Establishment Xinhai Revolution   -  Independence declared October 10, 1911... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...

Headquarters of the LDP in Tokyo.
Headquarters of the LDP in Tokyo.

By the early 1990s, the LDP's nearly four decades in power allowed it to establish a highly stable process of policy formation. This process would not have been possible if other parties had secured parliamentary majorities. LDP strength was based on an enduring, although not unchallenged, coalition of big business, small business, agriculture, professional groups, and other interests. Elite bureaucrats collaborated closely with the party and interest groups in drafting and implementing policy. In a sense, the party's success was a result not of its internal strength but of its weakness. It lacked a strong, nationwide organization or consistent ideology with which to attract voters. Its leaders were rarely decisive, charismatic, or popular. But it functioned efficiently as a locus for matching interest group money and votes with bureaucratic power and expertise. This arrangement resulted in corruption, but the party could claim credit for helping to create economic growth and a stable, middle-class Japan. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1560 KB) Headquarters of the Japanese Liberal Democratic Party in Tokyo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1560 KB) Headquarters of the Japanese Liberal Democratic Party in Tokyo. ... The Japanese civil service boasts over one million employees, with 400,000 workers in postal service, or Japan Post (since 2003), being the biggest part. ...


But by 1993, the end of the miracle economy and other reasons (e.g. Recruit scandal) led to the LDP losing that year's election, ending a 38-year reign over Japan. The winners, made up of opposition parties, formed a government under the liberal Japan Renewal Party. The Recruit Scandal was an insider trading and corruption scandal that forced many prominent Japanese politicians to resign in 1988. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Japan Renewal Party (also JRP)(新生党, Shinseitō) was a Japanese political party that existed in the early 1990s. ...


In 1994, the Socialists and New Party Sakigake left the ruling coalition, joining the LDP in the opposition. The remaining coalition of liberal parties tried to form a make shift minority government. This collapsed in 1994, when the Japan Socialist Party (JSP) formed a majority coalition with its former arch-rival the LDP. The LDP was thus returned to power, although it allowed a Socialist to occupy the Prime Minister's chair. The New Party Sakigake (新党さきがけ Shinto Sakigake) was a Japanese political party that broke away from the Liberal Democratic Party on June 22, 1993. ...


By 1996, the LDP was returned to power as a majority party. The party was practically unopposed until 1998, when the opposition Democratic Party of Japan was formed. Since then the opposition has been gaining momentum, especially in the 2003 and 2004 Parliamentary Elections. The Democratic Party of Japan ) is a liberal party in Japan. ...


In the dramatically paced 2003 House of Representatives elections, the LDP won 237 seats, while the DPJ won 177 seats. In the 2004 House of Councillors elections, in the seats up for grabs, the LDP won 49 seats and the DPJ 50, though in all seats (including those uncontested) the LDP still had a total of 114. Because of this electoral loss, former Secretary General Shinzo Abe turned in his resignation, but Party President Koizumi merely demoted him in rank, and he was replaced by Tsutomu Takebe. The Democratic Party of Japan ) is a liberal party in Japan. ... The House of Councillors ) is the upper house of the Diet of Japan. ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... Tsutomu Takebe is Japans current (2005) secretary general. ...


On November 10, 2003, the New Conservative Party (Hoshu Shintō) was absorbed into the LDP, a move which was largely because of the New Conservative Party's poor showing in the 2003 general election. is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Conservative Party (保守新党 Hoshu Shinto) is a now-defunct political party in Japan originally led by Hiroshi Kumagai. ...


Today, the LDP forms a coalition government with the conservative Buddhist New Komeito. The current party president is Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi is also an LDP member. The LDP remained the largest party in both houses of the Diet, until July 29, 2007, when the LDP lost its majority in the upper house.[1] A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... The New Clean Government Party (公明党, Kōmeitō) or NKP, often translated as New Komeito Party, is a political party in Japan endorsed by the Buddhist organisation Soka Gakkai. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Elections to the House of Councillors, the upper house of the legislature of Japan, will be held on July 22, 2007. ...


Presidents of the LDP

With the exception of Yohei Kono, every President of the LDP has also served as Prime Minister of Japan.

  1. Ichiro Hatoyama (4 May 195614 December 1956)
  2. Tanzan Ishibashi (14 December 195621 March 1957)
  3. Nobusuke Kishi (21 March 195714 July 1960)
  4. Hayato Ikeda (14 July 19601 December 1964)
  5. Eisaku Sato (1 December 19645 July 1972)
  6. Kakuei Tanaka (5 July 19724 December 1974)
  7. Takeo Miki (4 December 197423 December 1976)
  8. Takeo Fukuda (23 December 19761 December 1978)
  9. Masayoshi Ohira (1 December 197812 June 1980)
  10. Eiichi Nishimura (12 June 198015 July 1980) (acting)
  11. Zenko Suzuki (15 July 198025 November 1982)
  12. Yasuhiro Nakasone (25 November 198231 October 1987)
  13. Noboru Takeshita (31 October 19872 June 1989)
  14. Sosuke Uno (2 June 19898 August 1989)
  15. Toshiki Kaifu (8 August 198930 October 1991)
  16. Kiichi Miyazawa (31 October 199129 July 1993)
  17. Yohei Kono (30 July 199330 September 1995)
  18. Ryutaro Hashimoto (1 October 199524 July 1998)
  19. Keizo Obuchi (24 July 19985 April 2000)
  20. Yoshiro Mori (5 April 200024 April 2001)
  21. Junichiro Koizumi (24 April 200121 September 2006)
  22. Shinzo Abe (21 September 2006 – present)

Ichiro Hatoyama Ichirō Hatoyama (鳩山 一郎 Hatoyama Ichirō, January 1, 1883–March 7, 1959) was a Japanese politician and the 52nd, 53rd and 54th Prime Minister of Japan, serving terms from December 10, 1954 to March 19, 1955, from then to November 22, 1955, and from then to December 23, 1956. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ishibashi Tanzan (石橋 湛山 Ishibashi Tanzan, also referred as Tanzan Ishibashi September 25, 1884–April 25, 1973) was a Japanese journalist and politician. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Nobusuke Kishi Nobusuke Kishi (岸 信介 Kishi Nobusuke, November 13, 1896–August 7, 1987) was a Japanese politician and the 56th and 57th Prime Minister of Japan from February 25, 1957 to June 12, 1958 and from then to July 19, 1960. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hayato Ikeda Hayato Ikeda (æ± ç”° 勇人 Ikeda Hayato; December 3, 1899–August 13, 1965) born in Hiroshima Prefecture, was a Japanese politician and the 58th, 59th and 60th Prime Minister of Japan from July 19, 1960 to December 8, 1960, to December 9, 1963, and to November 9, 1964 respectively. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... This article or section needs to be updated. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kakuei Tanaka (田中 角栄 Tanaka Kakuei May 4, 1918–December 16, 1993) was a Japanese politician and the 64th and 65th Prime Minister of Japan from July 7, 1972 to December 22, 1972 and from December 22, 1972 to December 9, 1974 respectively. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 4th redirects here. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... Takeo Miki (三木 武夫 Miki Takeo March 17, 1907–November 4, 1988) was a Japanese politician and the 66th Prime Minister of Japan. ... December 4th redirects here. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Takeo Fukuda Takeo Fukuda (福田 赳夫 Fukuda Takeo January 14, 1905–July 5, 1995) was a Japanese politician and the 67th Prime Minister of Japan from December 24, 1976 to December 7, 1978. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Masayoshi Ōhira (大平 正芳 Ōhira Masayoshi March 12, 1910–June 12, 1980) was a Japanese politician and the 68th and 69th Prime Minister of Japan from December 7, 1978 to June 12, 1980. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Zenko Suzuki Zenkō Suzuki (鈴木 善幸 Suzuki Zenkō; January 11, 1911–July 19, 2004) was a Japanese politician and the 70th Prime Minister of Japan from July 17, 1980 to November 27, 1982. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, b. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Noboru Takeshita Noboru Takeshita (竹下 ç™» Takeshita Noboru, February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Sōsuke Uno (宇野 宗佑 Uno Sōsuke August 27, 1922–May 19, 1998) was a Japanese politician and the 75th Prime Minister of Japan from June 3, 1989 to August 10, 1989. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Toshiki Kaifu Toshiki Kaifu (海部 俊樹; born Dr Adam Liew on January 2, 1931) is a Japanese politician who was the 76th and 77th Prime Minister of Japan from 1989 to 1991. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Kiichi Miyazawa Kiichi Miyazawa (宮澤 喜一 Miyazawa Kiichi) (born 1919) is a Japanese politician and was the 78th Prime Minister from November 5, 1991 to August 9, 1993. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Yohei Kono (河野洋平, Kōno Yōhei, born January 15, 1937) is a Japanese politician. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Ryutaro Hashimoto (橋本龍太郎 Hashimoto RyÅ«tarō, July 29, 1937 - July 1, 2006) was a Japanese politician who served as the 82nd and 83rd Prime Minister of Japan from January 11, 1996 to July 30, 1998. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Keizo Obuchi Keizo Obuchi (小渕恵三; Obuchi Keizō June 25, 1937–May 14, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 84th Prime Minister of Japan from July 30, 1998 to April 5, 2000. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yoshiro Mori Yoshiro Mori (森 喜朗 Mori Yoshirō, born July 14, 1937) is a Japanese politician who served as the 85th and 86th Prime Minister of Japan from April 5, 2000 to April 26, 2001. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Platform

The LDP gains most of its support from rural conservative farmers, and it is also the established party of the bureaucracy, the famed keiretsu and white-collar workers. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, in his book The Lexus and the Olive Tree states that Japan under the LDP is the only country in which communism, by fact if not by name, ever worked. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ... A keiretsu lit. ... White-collar workers perform tasks which are less laborious yet often more highly paid than blue-collar workers, who do manual work. ...


On domestic policy the party is conservative. The party is the most right-wing and conservative party in Japan, and is still the most popular. Nevertheless, because of its status as the ruling party, it is marred by various special interests pushing for government patronage. The LDP has also been troubled by financial scandals. Advocacy is an umbrella term for organized activism related to a particular set of issues. ...


Basic principles

Unlike the leftist parties, the LDP did not espouse a well defined ideology or political philosophy. Its members held a variety of positions that could be broadly defined as being to the right of the opposition parties, yet more moderate than those of Japan's numerous rightist splinter groups. The LDP traditionally identified itself with a number of general goals: rapid, export-based economic growth; close cooperation with the United States in foreign and defense policies; and several newer issues, such as administrative reform. Administrative reform encompassed several themes: simplification and streamlining of government bureaucracy; privatization of stateowned enterprises; and adoption of measures, including tax reform, needed to prepare for the strain on the economy posed by an aging society. Other priorities in the early 1990s included promoting a more active and positive role for Japan in the rapidly developing Asia-Pacific region, internationalizing Japan's economy by liberalizing and promoting domestic demand, creating a hightechnology information society, and promoting scientific research. A business-inspired commitment to free enterprise was tempered by the insistence of important small business and agricultural constituencies on some form of protectionism. Although the Japanese economy is largely based on private enterprise, it does have a number of government-owned (public) corporations, which are more extensive and, in some cases, different in function from what exists in the United States. ... Agriculture, forestry, and fishing form the Primary sector of industry of the Japanese economy, together with the Japanese mining industry, but together they account for only 1. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over...


Structure

At the apex of the LDP's formal organization is the president (Japanese: sosai), who can serve two three-year terms (The presidential term was increased to three years from two years in 2002). While the party maintained a parliamentary majority, the party president was the prime minister. The choice of party president was formally that of a party convention composed of Diet members and local LDP figures, but in most cases, they merely approved the joint decision of the most powerful party leaders. To make the system more democratic, Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda introduced a "primary" system in 1978, which opened the balloting to some 1.5 million LDP members. The process was so costly and acrimonious, however, that it was subsequently abandoned in favor of the old "smoke-filled room" method. The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... The National Diet of Japan ) is Japans legislature. ... Takeo Fukuda Takeo Fukuda (福田 赳夫 Fukuda Takeo January 14, 1905–July 5, 1995) was a Japanese politician and the 67th Prime Minister of Japan from December 24, 1976 to December 7, 1978. ...


After the party president, the most important LDP officials are the Secretary-General (kanjicho), and the chairmen of the LDP Executive Council (somukaicho) and of the Policy Affairs Research Council (seimu chosakaicho).


The LDP was the most "traditionally Japanese" of the political parties because it relied on a complex network of patron-client (oyabun-kobun) relationships on both national and local levels. Nationally, a system of factions in both the House of Representatives and the House of Councillors tied individual Diet members to powerful party leaders. Locally, Diet members had to maintain koenkai (local support groups) to keep in touch with public opinion and gain votes and financial backing. The importance and pervasiveness of personal ties between Diet members and faction leaders and between citizens and Diet members gave the party a pragmatic "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" character. Its success depended less on generalized mass appeal than on the so-called sanban (three "ban"): jiban (a strong, well-organized constituency), kaban (a briefcase full of money), and kanban (prestigious appointment, particularly on the cabinet level). The House of Representatives ) is the lower house of the Diet of Japan. ... The House of Councillors ) is the upper house of the Diet of Japan. ... Koenkai (後援会; engl. ...


Factions

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In a sense, the LDP is not a single organization but a conglomeration of competitive factions, which, despite the traditional emphasis on consensus and harmony, engage in bitter infighting. Over the years, factions numbered from six to thirteen, with as few as four members and as many as 120, counting those in both houses. The system is operative in both houses, although it was more deeply entrenched in the House of Representatives than in the less powerful House of Councillors. Faction leaders usually are veteran LDP politicians. Many, but not all, have served as prime minister. Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


Faction leaders offer their followers services without which the followers would find it difficult, if not impossible, to survive politically. Leaders provide funds for the day-to-day operation of Diet members' offices and staff as well as financial support during expensive election campaigns. The operating allowances provided by the government are inadequate, even after the introduction of public funding in 1994. The leader also introduce his followers to influential bureaucrats and business people, which make it much easier for the followers to satisfy their constituents' demands.


Historically, the most powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP was Tanaka Kakuei, whose Mokuyo Club factions dual-house strength in the early 1980s exceeded 110. His followers remained loyal despite the fact that he had been convicted of receiving ¥500 million (nearly US$4 million) in bribes from Lockheed (the Lockheed scandal) to facilitate the purchase of its passenger aircraft by All Nippon Airways and that he had formally withdrawn from the LDP. Tanaka and his most bitter factional rival, Fukuda Takeo, were a study in contrasts. Tanaka was a roughhewn wheeler-dealer with a primary school education who had made a fortune in the construction industry; Fukuda was an elite product of the University of Tokyo Law Faculty and a career bureaucrat. Tanaka shook hands with his similarly-embattled contemporary, U.S. President Richard Nixon, during a Washington visit in July of 1973. ... The Lockheed Scandal of 1976 involved political donations paid by the American aircraft manufacturer Lockheed to Japanese politicians in return for aid in selling planes to All Nippon Airways. ... All Nippon Airways Company, Limited , TYO: 9202 , LSE: ANA), also known as ZennikkÅ« ) or ANA, is an airline headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. ... Fukuda traveled to Washington in 1977 to meet U.S. President Jimmy Carter. ... In Japan, as in every other country, the mainstay of infrastructure development is the construction industry, which employed 9. ... The University of Tokyo ), abbreviated as Todai ), is one of the leading research universities in Japan. ...


In the face of Fukuda's strong opposition, Tanaka engineered the selections of prime ministers Ohira Masayoshi (1978–80) and Suzuki Zenko (1980–82). The accession of Nakasone Yasuhiro to the prime ministership in 1982 would also not have occurred without Tanaka's support. As a result, Nakasone, at that time a politically weak figure, was nicknamed "Tanakasone." But Tanaka's faction was dealt a grave blow when one of his subordinates, Takeshita Noboru, decided to form a breakaway group. Tanaka suffered a stroke in November 1985, but four years passed before he formally retired from politics. Masayoshi Ōhira (大平 正芳 Ōhira Masayoshi March 12, 1910–June 12, 1980) was a Japanese politician and the 68th and 69th Prime Minister of Japan from December 7, 1978 to June 12, 1980. ... Zenkō Suzuki (鈴木 善幸 Suzuki Zenkō; January 11, 1911–July 19, 2004) was a Japanese politician and the 70th Prime Minister of Japan from July 17, 1980 to November 27, 1982. ... Yasuhiro Nakasone Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, b. ... Noboru Takeshita (竹下 登 Takeshita Noboru February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ...


The LDP faction system was closely fitted to the House of Representatives' medium-sized, multiple-member election districts. The party usually ran more than one candidate in each of these constituencies to maintain its lower house majority, and these candidates were from different factions. During an election campaign, the LDP, in a real sense, ran not only against the opposition but also against itself. In fact, intraparty competition within one election district was often more bitter than interparty competition, with two or more LDP candidates vying for the same block of conservative votes. For example, in the House of Representatives election of February 18, 1990, three LDP and three opposition candidates competed for five seats in a southwestern prefecture. Two of the LDP candidates publicly expressed bitterness over the entry of the third, a son of the prefectural governor. Local television showed supporters of one of the LDP candidates cheering loudly when the governor's son was edged out for the fifth seat by a Komeito candidate. Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on February 18, 1990. ... The Komeito (公明党), also known as Clean Government Party or CGP, was a political party in Japan. ...


There are currently five major factions in the LDP. While most factions have official titles, in the Japanese media they are usually referred to by the names of their current leaders. From most to least powerful, they are: A political faction is presently an informal grouping of individuals, especially within a political organisation, such as a political party, a trade union, or other group with some kind of political purpose (referred to in this article as the “broader organisation”). It may also be referred to as a power...


Heisei Kenkyūkai (Tsushima Faction)

The current chairman is Yuji Tsushima since September 2005. Formerly led by Ex-PM Ryutaro Hashimoto. The Tsushima faction was preceded by the Takeshita Faction of Noboru Takeshita. The faction's de facto leader is now Upper House member Mikio Aoki. It is a Keyensian and pro-China faction. It has strong influence on bureaucrats. Ex-PM Hashimoto and the entire faction were recently hit with a scandal where the faction had apparently taken money from the Japan Dental Association. Hashimoto resigned as chairman of the faction in 2004 and retired from politics the following year. Possible replacements included Kosuke Hori, Kyuma Fumio, Takao Fujii, and Fukushiro Nukaga. It currently has 48 seats in the Lower House and 29 seats in the Upper House. It is split with members who support Mr. Koizumi and those who do not. There are more supporting Mr. Koizumi. Because it has been the largest in numbers, the accusation of influence peddling and pork-barrel politics is rife. It is a descendant of the Tanaka faction. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ryutaro Hashimoto (橋本龍太郎 Hashimoto RyÅ«tarō, July 29, 1937 - July 1, 2006) was a Japanese politician who served as the 82nd and 83rd Prime Minister of Japan from January 11, 1996 to July 30, 1998. ... Noboru Takeshita Noboru Takeshita (竹下 ç™» Takeshita Noboru, February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ... Mikio Aoki (青木幹雄) is a Japanese politician. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fukushiro Nukaga (額賀福志郎, b. ...


Seiwa Seisaku Kenkyūkai (Machimura Faction)

Led by ex-Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura. Founded by Takeo Fukuda in 1962. It is a pro-classical economics and conservative faction. Current Prime Minister and Party President Shinzo Abe belonged to this faction. His deceased father Shintaro Abe was an ex-leader of this faction (1986 – 1991). Ex-Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and Yoshiro Mori also formerly led the faction. As of 2004 it has overtaken the Hashimoto faction in the more powerful Lower House, but it continues to trail in total number of members in both houses combined. It currently holds 51 seats in the Lower House and 23 seats in the Upper House. Nobutaka Machimura (町村信孝 Machimura Nobutaka, born 1944) is a Japanese politician. ... Takeo Fukuda Takeo Fukuda (福田 赳夫 Fukuda Takeo January 14, 1905–July 5, 1995) was a Japanese politician and the 67th Prime Minister of Japan from December 24, 1976 to December 7, 1978. ... Classical economics is widely regarded as the first modern school of economic thought. ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... Shintarō Abe (安倍 晋太郎; Abe Shintarō, April 29, 1924 - May 15, 1991) was a Japanese politician. ... Yoshiro Mori Yoshiro Mori (森 喜朗 Mori Yoshirō, born July 14, 1937) is a Japanese politician who served as the 85th and 86th Prime Minister of Japan from April 5, 2000 to April 26, 2001. ...


Shisuikai (Ibuki Faction)

Led by Bunmei Ibuki. After one member of this faction committed suicide at the beginning of August 2005 it has 27 seats in the Lower House and 18 seats in the Upper House. It is considered by many to be the most right-wing grouping among the major factions. This faction has effectively been dissolved since Kamei and other members left the party to establish the People's New Party in opposition to the postal privatisation bills. Bunmei Ibuki (伊吹文明), (born January 9, 1938) is a Japanese politician. ... Rather than surrender to US soldiers, the Mayor (Bürgermeister) of Leipzig Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ... The Peoples New Party (国民新党 Kokumin Shintō) is a Japanese political party formed on August 17, 2005 in the aftermath of the defeat of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumis Japan Post privatisation bills which led to a snap election. ... Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi has proposed splitting the powerful and rich Japan Post into four separate companies: a bank, an insurance company, a post office, and a company to handle the retail storefronts on these three. ...


Kōchikai (Koga Faction)

The current chairman is Makoto Koga. Mitsuo Horiuchi was co-leader until he temporarily left the faction in October 2006. It currently has 32 seats in the Lower House and 14 seats in the Upper House. This group was under the leadership of Koichi Kato until a split in 2001. It is more conservative and critical to Mr. Koizumi, and more successful than the section led by Kato. This faction historically has been the most prestigious faction, with many of its members drawn from the upper-ranks of the elite bureaucracy. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Koichi Kato (加藤 紘一; Katō Kōichi June 17, 1939 -) is a Japanese politician . ...


Kōchikai (Tanigaki Faction)

Led by Sadakazu Tanigaki. It was led by Koichi Kato until 2002, when Kato temporarily quit the Diet over a financial scandal surrounding his personal secretary. Kato was leader of the united Kochikai (including the wing now led by Horiuchi) until 2001, when the Kato Faction split after Kato had staged a failed rebellion against then-Prime Minister Mori Yoshiro. It has 12 seats in the Lower House and 4 seats in the Upper House. Sadakazu Tanigaki , born March 7, 1945) is Japans Minister of Finance in the cabinet of Junichiro Koizumi. ... Koichi Kato (加藤 紘一; Katō Kōichi June 17, 1939 -) is a Japanese politician . ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Kinmirai Seiji Kenkyūkai (Yamasaki Faction)

Led by Taku Yamasaki. It has 24 seats in the Lower House and 5 seats in the Upper House. Taku Yamasaki (山崎 拓; Yamasaki Taku, December 11, 1936 -) is a Japanese politician, a member of the House of Representatives of Japan. ...


Banchō Seisaku Kenkyūjo (Komura Faction)

Led by Masahiko Komura. It has 12 seats in the Lower House and 2 seats in the Upper House.


Taiyūkai (Kono Faction)

Formerly led by Yohei Kono, who is now Speaker of the House of Representatives. Once part of the former Kato faction, though this group split off during the mid-1990s. It has 9 seats in the Lower House and 1 seat in the Upper House. It is more critical to Mr. Koizumi and more reformist. It is now known as the Former Kono Faction because the resignation of the faction chief and the inability of the faction to decide on a new leader. Yohei Kono (河野洋平, Kōno Yōhei, born January 15, 1937) is a Japanese politician. ...


Atarashii Nami 'New Wave' (Nikai Faction)

Led by Toshihiro Nikai. It includes members of the former New Conservative Party, which was dissolved in 2003. It is one of the most right-wing groups in the LDP. It has 4 seats in the Lower House and 2 seats in the Upper House. Toshihiro Nikai (二階俊博 Nikai Toshihiro, born February 17, 1939) is a Japanese politician currently serving as Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry. ... The New Conservative Party (保守新党 Hoshu Shinto) is a now-defunct political party in Japan originally led by Hiroshi Kumagai. ...


Unaffiliated diet members

There are 25 factionally unaffiliated LDP members in the Lower House and 17 in the Upper House.


Performance in National Elections until 1993

see: Elections in Japan The Japanese political system has three types of elections: general elections to the House of Representatives held every four years (unless the lower house is dissolved earlier), elections to the House of Councillors held every three years to choose one-half of its members, and local elections held every four...


Election statistics show that, while the LDP had been able to secure a majority in the twelve House of Representatives elections from May 1958 to February 1990, with only three exceptions (December 1976, October 1979, and December 1983), its share of the popular vote had declined from a high of 57.8 percent in May 1958 to a low of 41.8 percent in December 1976, when voters expressed their disgust with the party's involvement in the Lockheed scandal. The LDP vote rose again between 1979 and 1990. Although the LDP won an unprecedented 300 seats in the July 1986 balloting, its share of the popular vote remained just under 50 percent. The figure was 46.2 percent in February 1990. Following the three occasions when the LDP found itself a handful of seats shy of a majority, it was obliged to form alliances with conservative independents and the breakaway New Liberal Club. In a cabinet appointment after the October 1983 balloting, a non-LDP minister, a member of the New Liberal Club, was appointed for the first time. In the July 18, 1993, lower house elections, the LDP fell so far short of a majority that it was unable to form a government. The Lockheed Scandal of 1976 involved political donations paid by the American aircraft manufacturer Lockheed to Japanese politicians in return for aid in selling planes to All Nippon Airways. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the upper house, the July 1989 election represented the first time that the LDP was forced into a minority position. In previous elections, it had either secured a majority on its own or recruited non-LDP conservatives to make up the difference of a few seats.


The political crisis of 1988–89 was testimony to both the party's strength and its weakness. In the wake of a succession of issues — the pushing of a highly unpopular consumer tax through the Diet in late 1988, the Recruit insider trading scandal, which tainted virtually all top LDP leaders and forced the resignation of Prime Minister Takeshita Noboru in April (a successor did not appear until June), the resignation in July of his successor, Uno Sosuke, because of a sex scandal, and the poor showing in the upper house election — the media provided the Japanese with a detailed and embarrassing dissection of the political system. By March 1989, popular support for the Takeshita cabinet as expressed in public opinion polls had fallen to 9 percent. Uno's scandal, covered in magazine interviews of a "kiss and tell" geisha, aroused the fury of female voters. The Recruit Scandal was an insider trading and corruption scandal that forced many prominent Japanese politicians to resign in 1988. ... Noboru Takeshita (竹下 登 Takeshita Noboru February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ... Sōsuke Uno (宇野 宗佑 Uno Sōsuke August 27, 1922–May 19, 1998) was a Japanese politician and the 75th Prime Minister of Japan from June 3, 1989 to August 10, 1989. ... Women posing as maiko (geisha apprentices), Kyoto, Japan wearing traditional furisode and okobo Geisha ) are traditional, female Japanese entertainers, whose skills include performing various Japanese arts, such as classical music and dance. ...


Yet Uno's successor, the eloquent if obscure Kaifu Toshiki, was successful in repairing the party's battered image. By January 1990, talk of the waning of conservative power and a possible socialist government had given way to the realization that, like the Lockheed affair of the mid-1970s, the Recruit scandal did not signal a significant change in who ruled Japan. The February 1990 general election gave the LDP, including affiliated independents, a comfortable, if not spectacular, majority: 275 of 512 total representatives. Toshiki Kaifu (海部 俊樹 Kaifu Toshiki; born January 2, 1931) is a Japanese politician who was the 76th and 77th Prime Minister of Japan from 1989 to 1991. ...


In October 1991, Prime Minister Kaifu Toshiki failed to attain passage of a political reform bill and was rejected by the LDP, despite his popularity with the electorate. He was replaced as prime minister by Miyazawa Kiichi, a long-time LDP stalwart. Defections from the LDP began in the spring of 1992, when Hosokawa Morihiro left the LDP to form the Japan New Party. Later, in the summer of 1993, when the Miyazawa government also failed to pass political reform legislation, thirty-nine LDP members joined the opposition in a no-confidence vote. In the ensuing lower house election, more than fifty LDP members formed the Shinseito and the Sakigake parties, denying the LDP the majority needed to form a government. Kiichi Miyazawa (宮澤 喜一 Miyazawa Kiichi) (born 1919) is a Japanese politician and was the 78th Prime Minister from November 5, 1991 to 1993. ... Morihiro Hosokawa (細川 護煕 Hosokawa Morihiro, b. ... The Japan New Party (日本新党 Nihon Shintō) is a Japanese political party that existed briefly from 1992 to 1994. ... The Japan Renewal Party (also JRP)(新生党, Shinseitō) was a Japanese political party that existed in the early 1990s. ... Spacecraft Sakigake Sakigake (MS-T5), was Japans first interplanetary spacecraft and was lauched January 7, 1985 from Kagoshima Space Center. ...


See also

The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#Government and politics. ... Political parties in Japan lists political parties in Japan. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ... The New Clean Government Party (公明党, Kōmeitō) or NKP, often translated as New Komeito Party, is a political party in Japan endorsed by the Buddhist organisation Soka Gakkai. ... Liberal conservatism is a variant of conservatism that combines the classical conservative concern for established tradition, respect for authority and (sometimes) religious values with liberal ideas, especially on economic issues (see economic liberalism, which advocates free market capitalism). ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... Shinzo Abe , ; born September 21, 1954) is the current Prime Minister of Japan, elected by a special session of the National Diet on September 26, 2006. ... Incumbent Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi A general election took place in Japan on November 9, 2003. ... Elections to the House of Councillors, the upper house of the legislature of Japan, were held on July 11, 2004. ... For a breakdown of the results by block district with maps, see Results of Japan general election, 2005 Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on 11 September 2005, about two years before the end of the term... Sanctuary is manga written by Yoshiyuki Okamura, and illustrated by Ryoichi Ikegami. ... Yoshiyuki Okamura (岡村善行, born 16 June 1947), also known as Buronson (武論尊) or Sho Fumimura (史村 翔 Fumimura Shō), is a Japanese manga writer most known by his famous work Hokuto no Ken (Fist of the North Star). ... Ryoichi Ikegami (池上 遼一 Ikegami Ryōichi, born 29 May 1944) is a manga artist. ...

References

  1. ^ [Norimitsu], Yasuko Kamiizumi & Makiko Inoue. "Exit Polls Show Loss for Japan Premier’s Party", The New York Times, The New York Times Company, 29-07-2007. Retrieved on 29-07-2007. 

The Country Studies are works published by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress ( USA), freely available for use by researchers. ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

  • (English) The official website of Liberal Democratic Party

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