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Encyclopedia > Liam Cosgrave
An Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave
Career
Party   Fine Gael
Rank  5th Taoiseach
Term  14 March 1973 - 5 July 1977
Preceded by  Jack Lynch
Succeeded by  Jack Lynch
Personal
Date of birth   Tuesday, 13 April 1920
Place of birth   Dublin, Ireland
Profession  Lawyer

Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born 13 April 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977. The son of W.T. Cosgrave (who served as the first President of the Executive Council from 1922 to 1932), Liam Cosgrave entered Irish politics, becoming a TD in Dáil Éireann in 1944, when his father retired. There are a number of political parties in the Republic of Ireland, and coalition governments are common. ... Fine Gael (IPA , though often mispronounced (approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in Ireland. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... A lawyer is a person qualified to give legal advice who advises clients in legal matters and represents them in courts of law and in other forms of dispute resolution. ... A formal Irish Gaelic name consists of a given name and a surname, as in English. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ... The President of the Executive Council (Irish: Uachtaráin na hArd-Chomhairle) was the head of government or prime minister of the 1922-1937 Irish Free State, and the leader of the Executive Council (cabinet). ... The Republic of Ireland is a sovereign, independent state. ... A Teachta Dála (Irish for Dáil Deputy, pronounced chock-ta dawla) is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower chamber of the Irish Oireachtas or National Parliament. ... The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ...


He retained his seat until his own retirement in 1981. Cosgrave served as Minister for External Affairs from 1954 until 1957. During his term as Minister, Ireland joined the United Nations. United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

Contents


Early life

From an early age Liam Cosgrave displayed a keen interest in politics, discussing the topic with his father as a teenager before eventually joining Fine Gael at the age of 17, speaking at his first public meeting the same year. He was educated at Castleknock College. To the surprise of his family, Liam decided to seek election to the Dail in 1943 and was duly elected as a TD at the age of 23, briefly sitting in parliament alongside his father W.T. Cosgrave who had founded the State in the 1920s. Cosgrave rapidly rose through the ranks of Fine Gael, becoming a parliamentary secretary when the party returned to power in 1948. Fine Gael (IPA , though often mispronounced (approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in Ireland. ... Castleknock College (Coláiste Caisleán Cnucha in Irish) is a private (fee-paying) secondary school for boys situated in the residential suburb of Castleknock, 8km west of the city centre in Dublin, Ireland. ... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ...


Minister at last

The first coalition Government collapsed in 1951. However in 1954 a second inter-party Government was formed. On this occasion Liam Cosgrave was given a cabinet position. As Minister for External Affairs Cosgrave took part in trade discussions and chaired the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe in 1955. He also successfully presided over Ireland's admittance to the United Nations, defining Irish foreign policy for decades in his first address to the General Assembly in 1956. These were important achievements for an Ireland of the time that was just finding its feet on the world stage after years of isolation after the Second World War. A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... The Palace of Europe in Strasbourg European Flag: used by the Council of Europe and by the European Union The Council of Europe (French: Conseil de lEurope , German: Europarat /ˌɔɪ.ˈro. ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Opposition

With Fine Gael back in opposition during the 1960s, an internal struggle for the soul of the party was beginning. A large body of members called on Fine Gael to move decisively to the left. A set of eight principles known as the Just Society was put forward to the party leadership. The principles called for higher state spending in Health and Social Welfare on top of a greater state role in the economy. Despite his conservative credentials, Cosgrave adopted a positive attitude to the Just Society document. Despite its radical plan, Fine Gael remained in opposition.


Fine Gael Leader

In 1965, when James Dillon retired as Fine Gael leader after the 1965 election loss, Liam Cosgrave, as a senior party figure and son of the first parliamentary leader of Fine Gael, easily won the leadership. Throughout his leadership, Cosgrave was seen as dour, conservative but utterly trustworthy and honourable. He played a key role in the Arms Crisis, when, as leader of the opposition, he pressured then Fianna Fáil leader and Taoiseach, Jack Lynch, to take action against senior ministers who were involved in importing arms intended for the Provisional IRA. James Dillon (26 September 1902 - 10 February 1986) was an Irish politician and leader of Fine Gael from 1959 to 1965. ... Fine Gael (IPA , though often mispronounced (approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in Ireland. ... The Arms Crisis was a political scandal in the Republic of Ireland, in which two government ministers from the Fianna Fáil political party were accused of attempting to illegally import £100,000 worth of weapons for the Provisional Irish Republican Army. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Ireland, but traditionally translated as Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all...


Cosgrave's determination to support government anti-terrorist legislation in votes in the Dáil, in the face of outright opposition from his party, almost cost him his leadership. The growing liberal wing in Fine Gael was opposing the Government's stringent laws on civil liberty grounds. Cosgrave, following in his father's footsteps, put the security of the State and its institutions first.


Risking his leadership Cosgrave was determined to vote for the Bill. However a series of Dublin bombings, which were heard in Leinster House, the home of the Republic's parliament just before the vote, led Fine Gael's liberal TDs to change their viewpoint and vote for the Bill. The Dublin and Monaghan Bombings on May 17, 1974 were a series of terrorist attacks on Dublin and Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland which left 33 people dead, and almost 300 injured, the largest number of casualties in any single day in The Troubles. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ...


Cosgrave's leadership was saved and his decisions apparently vindicated, although some believe that the Ulster Volunteer Force had set out to deliberately influence the vote by bombing Dublin on that day, knowing the brunt of the legislation would fall on the IRA. Cosgrave emerged from these events as a man of honour and integrity. Labour decided to ditch its anti-coalition stance and embrace Cosgrave as a possible Taoiseach. Pre-election pact talks began between the two parties and within months, he had again emulated his father by becoming Taoiseach. The Ulster Volunteer Force (more commonly referred to as the UVF) is a loyalist paramilitary group in Northern Ireland. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the army or the RA is an Irish Republican paramilitary organisation dedicated to the end of British rule in Northern Ireland and to a United Ireland. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ...

Liam Cosgrave's Election Poster
Liam Cosgrave's Election Poster

cropped general election poster of Liam Cosgrave, taken from an old photograph I took many years ago. ... cropped general election poster of Liam Cosgrave, taken from an old photograph I took many years ago. ...

Taoiseach

Cosgrave led a National Coalition of Fine Gael and Labour to victory in the 1973 General Election. It was the first non-Fianna Fáil government since the Second Inter-Party Government was elected in 1954. Cosgrave was determined not to alienate certain wings of his party in choosing his cabinet. The cabinet was described as being the "government of all talents", including such luminaries as future taoiseach and writer Garret FitzGerald, former United Nations diplomat, Conor Cruise O'Brien, Justin Keating and others. The 20th Dáil was elected on February 28, 1973 and first met on March 14 when the 14th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... Fine Gael (IPA , though often mispronounced (approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in Ireland. ... Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1973 was held on February 28, 1973. ... The 15th Dáil was elected on May 18, 1954 and first met on June 2 when the 7th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... Conor Cruise OBrien (born 3 November 1917) is an Irish politician, writer and academic. ... Justin Keating (born January 7, 1930) was a senior Irish Labour Party politician. ...


The National Coalition had a string of bad luck. It started with the world energy crisis, with caused inflationary problems. It suffered its first electoral defeat, when its odds-on favourite in the June 1973 presidential election, Tom O'Higgins, was unexpectedly defeated by the Fianna Fáil candidate, Erskine Hamilton Childers, who became President of Ireland. The 20th Dáil was elected on February 28, 1973 and first met on March 14 when the 14th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... World inflation rate, based on CIA factbook figures In economics, inflation is simply an increase in the money supply. ... Tom OHiggins (July 23, 1916 - February 25, 2003), was an Irish Fine Gael politician, a barrister, and a judge. ... Erskine Hamilton Childers (11 November 1905 - 17 November 1974), the son of Robert Erskine Childers (author of The Riddle of the Sands), served as the fourth President of Ireland from 1973 until his death in 1974. ... The President of Ireland (Irish: Uachtarán na hÉireann) is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland. ...


The presidency dogged the National Coalition. President Childers died suddenly in November 1974. The agreed replacement, Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh, though a former Irish Attorney-General (1946-48; 1951-53) and Chief Justice (1963-1973), was monumentally politically inexperienced and it showed. He needed guidance from the politically experienced Cosgrave. Unfortunately Cosgrave was someone who did not express his feelings openly (he only informed his wife, Vera, that he planned to resign on the morning he submitted it). Previously, presidents had been briefed by taoisigh (pronounced, 'thee-she', plural of taoiseach). While the frequency under the previous Taoiseach had declined as President de Valera's health declined in old age, Liam Cosgrave briefed Presidents Childers and Ó Dálaigh on average once every six months. Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh (12 February 1911 – 21 March 1978) (pronounced karol o dawl-ie) served as fifth President of Ireland, from 1974 to 1976. ...


Left unguided, the inexperienced Ó Dálaigh's relationship with the National Coalition deteriorated. When, in the aftermath of the assassination of the British Ambassador to Ireland, Sir Christopher Ewart Biggs, the President correctly referred a number of key anti-terrorist Bills to the Supreme Court to test their constitutionality, Paddy Donegan, an outspoken minister with a reputation for saying the wrong thing and who it turned out had a drink problem and had taken some drink that day, lashed the President as a "thundering disgrace" in a speech to senior army officers. (Some reports in later books claimed that the term used was "thundering bollocks and fucking disgrace", a version the President told a dinner party subsequently which he evidently believed was the correct one. However, the only journalist who was present at Donegan's speech insisted that the term Donegan used was "thundering disgrace"). Christopher Ewart-Biggs (died July 21, British Ambassador to the Republic of Ireland. ... Paddy Donegan (October 29, 1923 - November 26, 2000) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ...


Donegan, an honourable man, twice offered his resignation, as well as sending a fulsome apology to the President. However, in the biggest misjudgment of his career, Cosgrave twice refused the resignation, and in so doing, effectively besmirched the reputation of the President. The President, not so much angered by the outburst as the further comment, that the "army must stand behind the state", which the President interpreted as being a suggestion that he, the Commander-in-Chief of the Irish Army, didn't stand behind the state, an astonishing claim to make in front of Irish Army officers who had been commissioned by the President of Ireland. The Irish Army is the main branch of the Irish Defence Forces of the Republic of Ireland. ...


When Cosgrave failed to fire Donnegan, Ó Dálaigh resigned the presidency. He was replaced by the Fianna Fáil candidate, Patrick Hillery. The whole affair, and the National Coalition's treatment of an honourable if politically naïve man, severely damaged the government's reputation and tarnished Cosgrave's place in history. Dr. Patrick John Hillery (born May 2, 1923) is an Irish Fianna Fáil politician and the sixth President of Ireland from 1976 until 1990. ...


The Cosgrave government's tough anti-terrorist laws alienated the public, as did its tough austerity measures (Finance Minister Richie Ryan was nicknamed 'Richie Ruin' on a satirical TV programme). In 1977, the National Coalition was heavily defeated, with Fianna Fáil winning an unprecedented massive parliamentary majority through its infamous giveaway manifesto which would plunge the State into economic crisis during the late 1970s and much of the 1980s. In the immediate aftermath, Liam Cosgrave resigned as Fine Gael leader. He was replaced by his former Foreign Minister, Garret FitzGerald. Cosgrave did not contest the 1981 general election. Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ...


Overview

Between them, the two Cosgraves, W. T. and Liam, served in Dáil Éireann from 1918 to 1981. Both men headed governments; Leadership of the Irish Free State fell onto W.T's shoulders after the assassination of Michael Collins. W. T. was a founder of the state while his son Liam devoted his life to serving it. Liam's son Liam T. Cosgrave is also an Irish politician who was accused before the Mahon Tribunal of accepting illegal payments from property developers in return for voting to rezone property in Dublin: he resigned from the Fine Gael party when this became known, thereby effectively ending his political career and the Cosgrave political dynasty. The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) (1922–1937) was the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties that were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British and... Michael John Collins (Irish name Mícheál Eoin Ó Coileáin; 16 October 1890 – 22 August 1922) was an Irish revolutionary leader, served as Minister for Finance in the Irish Republic, as Director of Intelligence for the IRA, as a member of the Irish delegation during the Anglo-Irish Treaty... Liam T. Cosgrave (born 1956) is a Fine Gael politician in the Republic of Ireland. ...


Cabinet

The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... The Tánaiste (plural: Tánaistithe), or more formally An Tánaiste, is the deputy prime minister of the Republic of Ireland1. ... Brendan Corish ( 1918- 1990), Irish Labour leader ( 1960- 1977). ... The Minister for Finance is the senior minister at the Department of Finance (An Roinn Airgeadais) in the Irish Government. ... Richie Ryan (born November, 1929) is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... The Minister for Justice, Equality & Law Reform is the chief minister in charge of law and order in the Republic of Ireland. ... Patrick (Paddy) Cooney (born March 2, 1931) He was educated at Castleknock College and was a senior Irish politician. ... The Department of Enterprise Trade and Employment is one of the most important economic ministeries in the Irish Cabinet. ... Justin Keating (born January 7, 1930) was a senior Irish Labour Party politician. ... The modern title of Minister for Labour was created by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act, 1966 as a member of the Irish Government. ... Michael OLeary (8 May 1936 – 11 May 2006) was an Irish senior politician and barrister. ... The Minister for Agriculture and Food is an important position in the Irish Government. ... Mark Clinton (1915-2001) was a senior Irish politician. ... The Minister for Defence is in charge of the Department of Defence in the Republic of Ireland. ... Paddy Donegan (October 29, 1923 - November 26, 2000) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... Oliver J. Flanagan (22 May 1920 – 26 April 1987) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Education & Science is the chief person at the Department of Education & Science is engaged in a wide range of activities covering pllicy planning, quality assurance and providing a broad range of services for education in the Republic of Ireland. ... Richard (Dick) Burke (born March 28, 1932) was a senior Irish Fine Gael politician and a European Commissioner. ... Peter Barry (born August 10, 1928) is a retired Irish Fine Gael politician and businessman. ... The Minister for Health & Children has overall constitutional and political responsibility for the Department of Health & Children, while his or her duties include the creation and assessment of policy for the health services. ... Brendan Corish ( 1918- 1990), Irish Labour leader ( 1960- 1977). ... The Minister for Posts & Telegraphs was responsible for Irelands postal and telecommunications services since the foundation of the State until 1984, the department was one of the largest civil service departments in Ireland. ... Conor Cruise OBrien (born 3 November 1917) is an Irish politician, writer and academic. ... The Minister for Transport is the chief person at the Department of Transport in the Irish Government. ... Peter Barry (born August 10, 1928) is a retired Irish Fine Gael politician and businessman. ... (Thomas J) Tom Fitzpatrick (born 14th February, 1918) is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government is responsible for: election matters such as the general election and presidential elections, including electronic voting; the environment, Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; heritage; local authorities and related services. ... James Tully (born 18 September 1915) was a prominent Irish trade unionist, politician and Deputy Leader of the Irish Labour Party who served as a minister in a series of Irish Fine Gael-Labour coalition governments. ... The Minister for Communications, Marine & Natural Resources is the chief minister at the Department of the same name in the Irish Government. ... (Thomas J) Tom Fitzpatrick (born 14th February, 1918) is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ... Paddy Donegan (October 29, 1923 - November 26, 2000) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs is responsible for one of Irelands newest Departments of State. ... Thomas G. (Tom) ODonnell (born August, 1926) is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ...

Political career

Preceded by:
Eamonn Kissane
Parliamentary Secretary to the Taoiseach
1948-1951
Succeeded by:
Donnchadh Ó Briain
Preceded by:
Newly Created Position
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Industry & Commerce
1948 – 1951
Succeeded by:
Office Ceases to Exist
Preceded by:
Frank Aiken
Minister for External Affairs
1954-1957
Succeeded by:
Frank Aiken
Preceded by:
James Dillon
Leader of the Fine Gael Party
1965 – 1977
Succeeded by:
Garret FitzGerald
Leader of the Opposition
1965–1973
Succeeded by:
Jack Lynch
Preceded by:
Jack Lynch
Taoiseach
1973-1977
Preceded by:
Paddy Smith
Father of the Dáil
1977-1981
Succeeded by:
Oliver J. Flanagan


Eamonn Kissane was an Irish politician. ... The Minister of State at the Department of the Taoiseach is essentially the Irish Government Chief Whip and is the most senior Minister of State. ... Donnchadh Ó Briain was an Irish politician. ... A Minister of State, in the Republic of Ireland, is a junior minister of non-cabinet rank, attached to one or more Departments of State of the cabinet. ... The Department of Enterprise Trade and Employment is one of the most important economic ministeries in the Irish Cabinet. ... Frank Aiken (February 13, 1898 - May 18, 1983) was a senior Irish politician. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Frank Aiken (February 13, 1898 - May 18, 1983) was a senior Irish politician. ... James Dillon (26 September 1902 - 10 February 1986) was an Irish politician and leader of Fine Gael from 1959 to 1965. ... Fine Gael (IPA , though often mispronounced (approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in Ireland. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... The Leader of the Opposition (Ir Ceannaire an Fhreasúra) in the Republic of Ireland is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Parliamentary Opposition bloc in the lower house of the Irish Parliament, Dáil Éireann. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... Paddy Smith (1901 - 1982) was a senior Irish politician. ... Father of the House is a term that has by tradition been unofficially bestowed on certain members of some national legislatures, most notably the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. ... Oliver J. Flanagan (22 May 1920 – 26 April 1987) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ...

Prime Ministers of Ireland
Taoisigh na hÉireann
Government of Ireland

Éamon de Valera | John A. Costello | Seán Lemass | Jack Lynch | Liam Cosgrave | Charles Haughey | Garret FitzGerald | Albert Reynolds | John Bruton | Bertie Ahern The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet. ... Image File history File links COA_IRELAND.PNG Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Eamon de Valera[1] (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara (October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and the Republican anti-Treaty opposition in... John Aloysius Costello (20 June 1891 – 5 January 1976), a successful barrister, was one of the main legal advisors to the government of the Irish Free State after independence, Attorney-General of Ireland from 1926-1932 and Taoiseach from 1948-1951 and 1954-1957. ... Seán Francis Lemass (July 15, 1899 - May 11, 1971) was Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland and served as the second leader of Fianna Fáil from 1959 until 1966. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Charles Haughey Charles Haughey (Irish name Cathal Ó hEochaidh; born on 16 September 1925), was the sixth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving three terms in office; 1979 to 1981, March 1982 to December 1982 and 1987 to 1992. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... Albert Reynolds (born November 3, 1932), was the eighth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving one term in office from 1992 until 1994. ... John Gerard Bruton (born May 18, 1947) was the ninth Taoiseach (Prime Minister) of the Republic of Ireland. ... Patrick Bartholomew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born 12 September 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ...


Previous prime ministerial offices under earlier constitutions

Príomh Aire 1919—1921 Cathal Brugha | Éamon de Valera
President of the Irish Republic 1921—1922 Éamon de Valera | Arthur Griffith
Chairman of the Provisional Government 1922 Michael Collins | W.T. Cosgrave
President of the Executive Council 1922—1937 W.T. Cosgrave | Éamon de Valera
The head of government under the Dáil Constitution adopted by the First Dáil of the Irish Republic in January 1919. ... Cathal Brugha Cathal Brugha (born Charles William St. ... Eamon de Valera[1] (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara (October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and the Republican anti-Treaty opposition in... This article is about the president of the 1919-1922 Irish Republic Republic of Ireland see: President of Ireland. ... Eamon de Valera[1] (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara (October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and the Republican anti-Treaty opposition in... Arthur Griffith (Art Ó Gríofa in Irish) (March 31, 1872 – August 12, 1922) was the founder and first leader of Sinn Féin. ... The Chairman of the Provisional Government of Southern Ireland was a transitional post established in January 1922, lasting until the creation of the Irish Free State in December 1922. ... Michael John Collins (Irish name Mícheál Eoin Ó Coileáin; 16 October 1890 – 22 August 1922) was an Irish revolutionary leader, served as Minister for Finance in the Irish Republic, as Director of Intelligence for the IRA, as a member of the Irish delegation during the Anglo-Irish Treaty... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ... The President of the Executive Council (Irish: Uachtaráin na hArd-Chomhairle) was the head of government or prime minister of the 1922-1937 Irish Free State, and the leader of the Executive Council (cabinet). ... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ... Eamon de Valera[1] (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara (October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and the Republican anti-Treaty opposition in...

Leaders of Fine Gael
General Eoin O'Duffy (1933-1934) | William T. Cosgrave (1934-1944) | General Richard Mulcahy (1944-1959) | James Dillon (1959-1965) | Liam Cosgrave (1965-1977)  | Garret FitzGerald (1977-1987)  | Alan Dukes (1987-1990)  | John Bruton (1990-2001)  | Michael Noonan (2001-2002)  | Enda Kenny (2002-)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Liam Cosgrave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1402 words)
Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born 13 April 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977.
To the surprise of his family, Liam decided to seek election to the Dail in 1943 and was duly elected as a TD at the age of 23, briefly sitting in parliament alongside his father W.T. Cosgrave who had founded the State in the 1920s.
Liam's son Liam T. Cosgrave is also an Irish politician who was accused before the Mahon Tribunal of accepting illegal payments from property developers in return for voting to rezone property in Dublin: he resigned from the Fine Gael party when this became known, thereby effectively ending his political career and the Cosgrave political dynasty.
W.T. Cosgrave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2693 words)
Cosgrave immediately went to London for a meeting with the British Prime Minister and the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, where they agreed to let the border remain as it was.
Cosgrave's governments in particular played a crucial role in the evolution of the British Empire into the British Commonwealth, with fundamental changes to the concept of the role of the Crown, the governor-generalship and the British Government within the Commonwealth.
Cosgrave's son, Liam, succeeded his father as a TD in 1944 and went on to become leader of Fine Gael from 1965 to 1977 and Taoiseach from 1973 to 1977.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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