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Encyclopedia > Li Zicheng

Lǐ Zìchéng (李自成) (September 22, 1606 - 1644), born Li Hóngjī (鴻基), was a rebel in late Ming Dynasty China who proclaimed himself Chuǎng Wáng (闖王), or "The Roaming King". September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... // Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ... The Míng Dynasty (Chinese: 明朝; Pinyin: Míng Cháo) was the ruling dynasty of China from 1368 to 1644. ...


Born in Mizhi District (米脂縣), Yan'an Subprefecture (延安府), Shaanxi, Li grew up as a shepherd. Li started to learn horseriding and archery at age 20. According to folklore, in 1630 he was put on public display in an iron collar and shackles for his failure to repay loans to an usurious magistrate, Ai. Ai struck a guard who offered shade and water to Li, whence a group of peasants tore apart Li's shackles, spirited him to a nearby hill, and proclaimed him their leader. Despite having only wooden sticks, Li and his band ambushed police sent against them and obtained their first real weapons. A terrible famine had beset Shaanxi in this time, and in three years, Li gathered more than 20,000 soldiers. The rebels then attacked and killed leading officials in places in Henan, Shanxi, and Shaanxi. Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ... These arrows score as an inner 10, and a 9 Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... // Ai (as a word, proper name and acronym) can refer to many things. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... Shanxi (Chinese: 山西; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shansi) is a province in the northern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling...


In April 1644, Li's rebels sacked the Ming capital of Beijing, and the last Ming emperor committed suicide. He proclaimed himself as the Emperor of Shun Dynasty (大順皇帝). Li died after his army was defeated on May 27, 1644 by the Manchus and Wu Sangui, either by committing suicide or was killed by pro-Ming militia during his escape at the age of 40. Some folk tales hold that Li didn't die upon defeat, but instead became a monk. // Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ... Beijing (Chinese: 北京; ; IPA: ), a city in northern China (formerly spelled in English as Peking or Peiking), is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Chongzhen Emperor (WG: Chung-chen) (February 6, 1611 - April 25, 1644) was last emperor of Ming dynasty in China between 1627 and 1644. ... The Manchu (Manchu: Manju; Simplified Chinese: 满族; Traditional Chinese: 滿族; Hanyu pinyin: ) are a Tungusic people who originated in Northeastern Asia, collectively known in English as Manchuria. ... Wu Sangui (Chinese: 吳三桂; pinyin: Wú Sānguì; WG: Wu San-kuei) (1612 - October 2, 1678) was a Ming Chinese general who opened the gates of the Great Wall of China at Shanhai Pass to let Manchu soldiers into China proper. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... The Ming Dynasty (Chinese: 明朝; Pinyin: míng cháo) was the ruling dynasty of China from 1368 to 1644, though claims to the Ming throne (now collectively called the Southern Ming) survived until 1662. ... A “Monk” is a person who practices asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ...


Li Zicheng historiography

Although the Qing conquest of China was made possible by the Ming Dynasty being weakened by the Li Zicheng rebellion, ironically, official historiography during the Qing Dynasty regarded Li as an illegitimate usurper and bandit. This view sought to discourage and demonize any notions of rebellion against the Qing government. It tries to propagate the notion that the Qing Dynasty ended the illegitimate rule of Li and restored honor to the empire, receiving the heavenly mandate to rule China. In 20th century Maoist China, the anti-Confucian and radical inclinations of the Chinese Communist Party viewed Li Zicheng favorably, portraying him as an early revolutionary against feudalism. To this end, the government of the People's Republic of China honored Li with a large monument in Beijing. The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was a dynasty founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China, expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing the... Mao could refer to: Mao Zedong, (Mao Tse-Tung in Wade-Giles) leader of the Communist Party of China from 1935 to 1976. ... Confucianist temple Thian Hock Keng in Singapore Confucianism (Chinese: å„’å­¦, Pinyin: Rúxué‚ [ ] , literally The School of the Scholars; or, less accurately, 孔教 Kŏng jiào, The Religion of Confucius) is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system originally developed from the teachings of the early Chinese sage Confucius. ... Communist Party of China flag The Communist Party of China (Simplified Chinese: 中国共产党; Traditional Chinese: 中國共産黨; pinyin: Zhōnggu ngchǎndǎng) is the ruling party of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Beijing (Chinese: 北京; ; IPA: ), a city in northern China (formerly spelled in English as Peking or Peiking), is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ...

Preceded by:
Chongzhen Emperor
Emperor of China
(Shun Dynasty)
1644
Succeeded by:
Shunzhi Emperor

Chongzhen Emperor (WG: Chung-chen) (February 6, 1611 - April 25, 1644) was last emperor of Ming dynasty in China between 1627 and 1644. ... The emperor or huángdì (皇帝) of China was the head of government and head of state of China from the Qin dynasty in 221 BC until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911. ... The Shunzhi Emperor (March 15, 1638–February 5, 1661?) was the second emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty, and the first Qing emperor to rule over China proper from 1644 to 1661. ...

External links

  • Maoist era propaganda posters glorifying Li Zicheng

  Results from FactBites:
 
Li Zicheng - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (407 words)
In April 1644, Li's rebels sacked the Ming capital of Beijing, and the last Ming emperor committed suicide.
Li died after his army was defeated on May 27, 1644 by the Manchus and Wu Sangui, either by committing suicide or was killed by pro-Ming militia during his escape at the age of 40.
Although the Qing conquest of China was made possible by the Ming Dynasty being weakened by the Li Zicheng rebellion, ironically, official historiography during the Qing Dynasty regarded Li as an illegitimate usurper and bandit.
Closing Doors (3302 words)
Li Zicheng despised the Ming imperial bureaucracy and blamed its moral depravity for China's ruin.
Li Zicheng had no problem with the idea of creating a new dynasty, but when obsequious Ming officials offered to instruct him in the duties of emperorship, he put forty-six officials to death and heavily taxed the rest to help pay off his soldiers.
In the weeks that followed, Li Zicheng grew impatient waiting for General Wu Sangui's forces and turned against the general's family, massacring the lot and hanging the head of Wu's father from the city walls.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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