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Encyclopedia > Lexington, Massachusetts
Lexington, Massachusetts
Statue of Captain John Parker of the Lexington Militia on Lexington Green, by H. H. Kitson.
Statue of Captain John Parker of the Lexington Militia on Lexington Green, by H. H. Kitson.

Flag

Seal
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°26′50″N 71°13′30″W / 42.44722, -71.225
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Middlesex
Settled 1642
Incorporated 1713
Government
 - Type Representative town meeting
Area
 - Total 16.5 sq mi (42.8 km²)
 - Land 16.4 sq mi (42.5 km²)
 - Water 0.1 sq mi (0.4 km²)
Elevation 210 ft (64 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 30,355
 - Density 1,851.0/sq mi (714.7/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 02420 / 02421
Area code(s) 339 / 781
FIPS code 25-35215
GNIS feature ID 0619401
Website: http://ci.lexington.ma.us/

Lexington is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 30,355 at the 2000 census. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 568 pixelsFull resolution (2290 × 1625 pixel, file size: 786 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Henry Hudson Kitsons Minute Man Statue on the Green in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Henry Hudson Kitson, American sculptor, born in Huddersfield, England on April 9, 1865 and died at Tyringham, Massachusetts, on June 26, 1947. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Lexington_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... A Representative Town Meeting is a form of municipal legislature used in Massachusetts. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 339 is an overlay of parts of area code 781. ... Under the North American Numbering Plan for telephone area codes, area code 781 covers suburban Boston, Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The town is famous for being the site of the opening shots of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the first engagement of the American Revolution. Combatants Militia of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, (Minutemen) British Army, British Marines, Royal Artillery Commanders John Parker, James Barrett, John Buttrick, William Heath, Joseph Warren Francis Smith, John Pitcairn, Walter Laurie, Hugh, Earl Percy Strength 75 at Lexington Common (Parker). ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...

Contents

History

Lexington was first settled in 1642 as the Cambridge Farms parish of Cambridge, Massachusetts and was incorporated as a separate town in 1713[1]. It was named in honor of Lord Lexington, a British nobleman.[2] Some believe it was named after Lexington (which was pronounced and today spelled Laxton) in Nottinghamshire, England.[3] Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Laxton is a small village in Nottinghamshire, best known for having the last remaining working open field system in the UK. The village also has the remains of a Norman motte and bailey castle and a small Holocaust Museum. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


For decades, Lexington showed modest growth while remaining largely a farming community, providing Boston with much of its produce. It always had a bustling downtown area, which remains to this day. Lexington began to prosper, helped by its close proximity to Boston, and having a rail line (now the Minuteman Bikeway) service its citizens and businesses. For many years, East Lexington was considered a separate entity from the rest of the town, and it still retains a degree of separation, due in part to some of its blue collar neighborhoods, a contrast to many of the wealthier parts of town. The Minuteman Commuter Bikeway in Bedford, near Wiggins Avenue The Minuteman Bikeway is a 10 mile (16 km) paved mixed-use path/rail trail in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. ...


Lexington, as well as many of the towns along the Route 128 corridor, experienced a jump in population in the 1960s and 70s, due to the high tech boom. Property values in the town soared, and the school system became nationally recognized for its excellence. The town participates in the METCO program, which buses minority students from Boston to suburban towns to, in theory, receive a better education in a safer environment than in Boston Public Schools. METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity) is a Boston-based program operated and funded by the Department of Education (MA DOE) of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


Every year, on the third Monday of April, the town observes Patriots' Day. Events begin with Paul Revere's Ride, with a special re-enactment of the scene on the Battle Green. At 6 a.m., there is a re-enactment of the skirmish on the Battle Green, with shots fired from the Battle Green and the nearby Buckman Tavern (to account for the fact that no one knows where the first shot was fired from, or by whom). After the rout, the British march on toward Concord. The battle in Lexington allowed the Concord militia time to organize at the Old North Bridge, where they were able to turn back the British and prevent them from capturing and destroying the militia's arms stores. The actual events occurred on April 19, 1775. Minuteman Statue on the Lexington Green in Lexington, Massachusetts Patriots Grave in the Old Burying Ground, Arlington, Massachusetts. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... Buckman Tavern, Lexington, Massachusetts. ...


Throughout the rest of the year many tourists enjoy tours of the town's historic landmarks such as Buckman Tavern, Munroe Tavern, and the Hancock-Clarke House, which are maintained by the town's historical society. Munroe Tavern, Lexington, Massachusetts. ... The Hancock-Clarke House, Lexington, Massachusetts. ...


Geography

Lexington is located at 42°26′39″N, 71°13′36″W (42.444345, -71.226928).GR1


According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 42.8 km² (16.5 mi²). 42.5 km² (16.4 mi²) of it is land and 0.4 km² (0.1 mi²) of it (0.85%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Lexington borders the Following towns: Burlington, Woburn, Winchester, Arlington, Belmont, Waltham, Lincoln, and Bedford. Burlington is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Statue of Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) outside the library of his hometown, Woburn, Massachusetts. ... Winchester is a town located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1807 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town Manager Brian Sullivan  - Board of    Selectmen Kevin F. Greeley Annie LaCourt Diane Mahon Clarissa Rowe John W. Hurd Area  - Town  5. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1636 Incorporated 1859 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  4. ... One of the early centers of the Industrial Revolution in northern America, Waltham is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Lincoln is a town located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1640 Incorporated 1729 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town Administrator Richard Reed Area  - Town  13. ...


Demographics

Topography of Lexington and environs
Topography of Lexington and environs

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 30,355 people, 11,110 households, and 8,432 families residing in the town. The population density was 714.6/km² (1,851.0/mi²). There were 11,333 housing units at an average density of 266.8/km² (691.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 86.13% White, 10.90% Asian, 1.13% Black or African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.41% of the population. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2560x2440, 2742 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arlington, Massachusetts Lexington, Massachusetts Belmont, Massachusetts Minuteman Bikeway Spy Pond ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2560x2440, 2742 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arlington, Massachusetts Lexington, Massachusetts Belmont, Massachusetts Minuteman Bikeway Spy Pond ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 11,110 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.0% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.1% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.10. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 19.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.5 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $96,825, and the median income for a family was $111,899. Males had a median income of $81,857 versus $50,090 for females. The per capita income for the town was $46,119. About 1.8% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Education

Public schools

Joseph Estabrook Elementary School is an elementary school in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... William Diamond Middle School is located in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Jonas Clarke Middle School is one of the two middle schools in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup because it is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. ... Minuteman Regional High School is a public vocational high school (grades 9-12) in Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. The school serves the towns of Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Bolton, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Dover, Lancaster, Lexington, Lincoln, Needham, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland, Weston and many other cities and towns in Eastern Massachusetts. ...

Private schools

Points of interest

  • Lexington is probably most well-known for its history and is home to many historical buildings, parks, and monuments, most dating from Colonial and Revolutionary times.
  • One of the most prominent historical landmarks, located in Lexington Center, is the Battle Green, where the skirmish was fought, and the Minute Man Statue in front of it.
  • Another important historical monument is the Revolutionary Monument, the nation's oldest war memorial (completed on July 4, 1799) and the gravesite of those colonists slain in the Battle of Lexington.
  • Other landmarks of historical importance include the Old Burying Ground (with gravestones dating back to 1690), the Old Belfry, Buckman Tavern (circa 1704-1710), Munroe Tavern (circa 1690), the Hancock-Clarke House (circa 1698), the U.S.S. Lexington Memorial, the Old Depot train station, and Follen Church (the oldest standing church building in Lexington, built in 1839).
  • Lexington is also home to the 900-acre Minute Man National Historical Park and the National Heritage Museum, which showcases exhibits on American history and popular culture.
  • Engraved memorial bricks lining the Lexington Depot sidewalk
    Engraved memorial bricks lining the Lexington Depot sidewalk
    Central to the town is Lexington's town center, home to numerous dining opportunities, fine art galleries, retail shopping, a small cinema, the Cary Memorial Library, the Minuteman Bikeway, Depot Square, and many of the aforementioned historical landmarks.
  • Lexington is also renowned for its public education system, which includes six elementary schools, two middle schools, and Lexington High School, ranked the 304th best high school in the nation.[1]
  • The Cotting School, America's first day school for children with special needs, moved to Lexington in 1986.

This article is about the colonial history of the United States. ... Map of the thirteen colonies in 1775 From 1776 through 1789, the history of the United States included the formation of the independent country of the United States and the drawing and ratification of its new government. ... Lexington Battle Green monument, 1799 The Lexington Battle Green, known before the 1850s as Lexington Common, is the site of the opening shots of the American Revolution in 1775. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ... Buckman Tavern, Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Munroe Tavern, Lexington, Massachusetts. ... The Hancock-Clarke House, Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... The Follen Church Society a Unitarian Universalist congregation in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Old North Bridge. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 380 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1428 pixel, file size: 530 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 380 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1428 pixel, file size: 530 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The town centre (center) is usually the commercial or geographical centre of a town. ... In general terms, eating is the process of consuming something edible. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Shopping is the examining of goods or services from retailers with intent to purchase. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... The Minuteman Commuter Bikeway in Bedford, near Wiggins Avenue The Minuteman Bikeway is a 10 mile (16 km) paved mixed-use path/rail trail in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. ... // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... In computational complexity theory, the complexity class ELEMENTARY is the union of the classes in the exponential hierarchy. ... Middle school and junior high school cover a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education and serve as a bridge between them. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup because it is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. ... Cotting School is a private, non-profit school for children with special needs located in Lexington, Massachusetts. ...

Notable residents

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... WBZ-TV is the CBS owned-and-operated television station serving the Boston, Massachusetts television market. ... The name Steve Bennett refers to more than one person: Steve Bennett, the head of Starchaser, a company involved in space development and tourism. ... Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... Avram Noam Chomsky (Hebrew: אברם נועם חומסקי) (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The original edition of Letters from Lexington: Reflections on Propaganda, first published in 1993, solidified Noam Chomskys position as Americans most distinguished critic of the media. ... Francis Judd Cooke (b. ... John Deutch John Mark Deutch (born July 27, 1938) was Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from May 10, 1995 until December 14, 1996. ... Rachel Susan Dratch (born February 22, 1966) is an American actress and comedian, perhaps best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live from 1999 to 2006. ... This article is about the American television series. ... David Elkind is an author and child psychologist. ... Philip Elmer-DeWitt (born Boston, Massachusetts, Sept. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Carl Edward Everett III (born June 3, 1971 in Tampa, Florida) is a former All-star Major League Baseball outfielder. ... The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Jean Bodman Fletcher was an architect who was a founding member of the Architects Collaborative. ... Norman Collings Fletcher (born December 8, 1917) is an American architect who was a co-founder and partner of the architecual firm The Architcts Collaborative (TAC), working there from 1945 until his retirement in 1989. ... Henry Louis Skip Gates, Jr. ... For other persons named John Hancock, see John Hancock (disambiguation). ... Sarah Pillsbury Harkness is an architect. ... The Architects Collaborative (TAC) was an American architectural firm founded by Walter Gropius in 1945 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... Bill Janovitz is best known as the singer and guitarist of the alternative rock band Buffalo Tom. ... Buffalo Tom Buffalo Tom is an alternative rock band from Boston, Massachusetts, formed in the 1980s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dennis Johnson (September 18, 1954 – February 22, 2007), nicknamed DJ, was an American professional basketball player and coach. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Joyce Kulhawik is the arts and entertainment anchor for WBZ-TV News in Boston. ... WBZ-TV is the CBS owned-and-operated television station serving the Boston, Massachusetts television market. ... Raef Andrew LaFrentz (born May 29, 1976, in Hampton, Iowa) is an American professional basketball player currently with the NBAs Portland Trail Blazers. ... The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... Stephen Morgan Steve Leach (b. ... Bill Lichtenstein is an award-winning former investigative producer for 20/20, World News Tonight and Nightline, and founded LCM in 1990, following his diagnosis and recovery from bipolar disorder. ... Salvador Edward Luria (August 13, 1912 – February 6, 1991) was an Italian microbiologist whose pioneering work on phages helped open up molecular biology. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Roland V. Rollie Massimino (born November 13, 1934 in Hillside, New Jersey, United States) is a mens college basketball coach. ... Villanova (Latin, new villa) is a generic placename that can refer to several places: Arnaldus de Villanova, a 14 century alchemist, astrologer and physician. ... Lexington High School is a public high school located in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Matt Nathanson (born 28 March 1973 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a singer-songwriter whose work is a blend of folk and rock music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Douglas Melton is co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. ... Mario J. Molina (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Joseph Nye (born 1937) is the founder, along with Robert Keohane, of the international relations theory neoliberalism (international relations) developed in their 1977 book Power and Interdependence. ... Soft power is a term used in international relations theory to describe the ability of a political body, such as a state, to indirectly influence the behavior or interests of other political bodies through cultural or ideological means. ... This article is about the musician-artist-author. ... The Dresden Dolls are an American musical duo from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Charles Ponzi (March 3, 1882–January 18, 1949) was an Italian immigrant to the United States who became one of the greatest swindlers in American history. ... John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American philosopher, a professor of political philosophy at Harvard University and author of A Theory of Justice (1971), Political Liberalism, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, and The Law of Peoples. ... Ruth Sawyer was the pseudonym of Lucinda Durand (August 5, 1880 - June 3, 1970), an American writer of childrens books. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Clifford Glenwood Shull (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 23, 1915 – March 31, 2001) was a Nobel Prize-winning American physicist. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... ABIGAIL THERNSTROM Vice-Chair Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute New York City, New York POLITICAL AFFILIATION: REPUBLICAN Abigail Thernstrom is a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York, a member of the Massachusetts State Board of Education, and a commissioner on the United States Commission on Civil Rights. ... The Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) is an independent federal agency of the United States government. ... Melanie Thernstrom (b. ... Sheila E. Widnall (official portrait) Institute Professor Sheila Evans Widnall is a American aerospace researcher and educator. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... E.O. Wilson with Dynastes hercules E. O. Wilson, or Edward Osborne Wilson, (born June 10, 1929) is an entomologist and biologist known for his work on ecology, evolution, and sociobiology. ... Entomology is the scientific study of insects. ... Ethan Zohn (born on November 12, 1973 in Lexington, Massachusetts) won $1,000,000 on Survivor: Africa, the third season of Survivor. ... Survivor: Africa was the third installment of the popular United States reality show Survivor. ...

Sister cities

Lexington is a sister city of This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Flag of France Antony, France
Flag of Mexico Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico
Flag of Ukraine Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Antony is a commune in the southern suburbs of Paris, France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Dolores Hidalgo (in full, Dolores Hidalgo Cuna de la Independencia Nacional) is a small city and its surrounding municipality in the north-central part of the Mexican state of Guanajuato. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Location Map of Ukraine with Dnipropetrovsk highlighted. ...

References

External links

Coordinates: 42.444345° N 71.226928° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

  • Lexington (Massachusetts) travel guide from Wikitravel

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lexington, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1279 words)
Lexington is a town located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
Lexington was first settled in 1642 and was officially incorporated in 1713.
Lexington is a sister city of Antony, France; Haifa, Israel; and Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine.
Lexington, Massachusetts - definition of Lexington, Massachusetts in Encyclopedia (542 words)
The town is notable as the site of the opening shots ("the shot heard round the world") of the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the first engagement of the American Revolutionary War.
Lexington was first settled in 1640 and was officially incorporated in 1713.
Lexington is a sister city of: Antony, France
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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