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Encyclopedia > Lexington, Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky
Image:Flag of Lexington.jpg
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Seal
Nickname: "Athens of the West" "Horse Capital of the World
Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Coordinates: 38°01′47″N 84°29′41″W / 38.02972, -84.49472
Country United States
State Kentucky
Counties Fayette
Government
 - Mayor Jim Newberry (D)
Area
 - City  285.5 sq mi (739.5 km²)
 - Land  284.5 sq mi (736.9 km²)
 - Water  1.0 sq mi (2.6 km²)
Elevation  978 ft (298 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 268,080
 - Density 915.6/sq mi (353.5/km²)
 - Metro 429,889
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://www.lfucg.com/

Lexington, Kentucky, United States, known as the "Horse Capital of the World," is located in the heart of the Bluegrass region. It is the second-largest city in Kentucky, after Louisville, Kentucky,[1] and the 69th largest in the United States. On January 1, 1974 Lexington became the first municipality in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to form a consolidated city-county government by merging with Fayette County. In 2005, the population estimate given by the U.S. Census Bureau was 268,080. ImageMetadata File history File links PhotodowntownLexKY.JPG Summary Photo of downtown Lexington, Kentucky. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... Image File history File links Map_of_Kentucky_highlighting_Fayette_County. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Map of Kentuckys counties This is a list of the one hundred and twenty counties in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Jim Newberry was elected Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky on November 7, 2006. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Bluegrass and rock fence of local limestone in central Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Lexington is home to the Kentucky Horse Park, Keeneland race course, the Red Mile race course, Transylvania University and the University of Kentucky (UK). UK's basketball program is immensely popular in the city and throughout the state. The University of Kentucky Wildcats basketball team has won more games than any other team in college basketball history. The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm and an educational theme park located in a rural area of Lexington, Kentucky in the United States. ... Keeneland Race Course at Dawn There is also a town in Jefferson County, Kentucky, with the same name, unrelated to this article; for the town, see Keeneland, Kentucky. ... The Red Mile is a horse racing track located in Lexington, KY. The track hosts harness racing, a type of horse racing in which the horses must pull two-wheeled carts called sulkies while racing. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ...


Lexington has been selected to be the site of the 2010 FEI World Equestrian Games.[2] The 2010 FEI World Equestrian Games will be held in Lexington, Kentucky from September 25 to October 10, 2010. ...

Contents

History

See also: History of Kentucky

Lexington was founded in June 1775 in Virginia (17 years before Kentucky became a state). A party of frontiersmen, led by William McConnell, camped on the Middle Fork of Elkhorn Creek (today called Town Branch and rerouted under Vine Street) at the location known today as McConnell Springs. Upon hearing of the colonists' victory in the Battles of Lexington and Concord, on April 19, 1775, they named their campsite Lexington after Lexington, Massachusetts. Due to the danger of Indian attacks, permanent settlement was delayed for four years. In 1779, Colonel Robert Patterson and 25 companions came from Fort Harrod and erected a blockhouse. Cabins and a stockade were soon built, making the fort a place of importance. The town of Lexington was established on May 6, 1782, by an act of the Virginia General Assembly. The history of Kentucky spans hundreds of years, and has been influenced by the states diverse geography and central location. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Elkhorn Creek is a creek running through several counties in Central Kentucky. ... Combatants Militia of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, (Minutemen) British Army, Royal Marines Commanders John Parker, James Barrett, William Heath Francis Smith, John Pitcairn, Walter Laurie, Lord Hugh Percy Strength 75 at Lexington Green (Parker). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  16. ... Colonel Robert Patterson (1753-1827) was an American Revolutionary War veteran who helped found the cities of Lexington, Kentucky and Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Harrodsburgs city hall. ... A 19th-century-era block house in Fort York, Toronto In military science, a blockhouse is a small, isolated fort in the form of a single building. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ...


By 1820, it was one of the largest and wealthiest towns west of the Allegheny Mountains. So cultured was its lifestyle, Lexington gained the nickname "Athens of the West." One early prominent citizen, John Wesley Hunt, became the first millionaire west of the Alleghenies. Slaves were widely held and used as laborers, field hands and domestic servants in Kentucky. In 1850, 1/5 of the state's population were slaves, and Lexington had the highest concentration of slaves in the state. However, the state attempted to remain neutral during the Civil War. Not only were both Abraham Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis born in Kentucky (less than one year and 100 miles apart), but both had spent time in Lexington. Davis attended Transylvania University in 1823 and 1824. Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, was born and raised in Lexington; the couple visited the city several times after their marriage in 1842. Lexington hosted one of the first drug rehabilitation clinics, known as the "Addiction Research Center," which opened in 1935 [8]. It also has a Federal Prison. The first alcohol and drug rehabilitation hospital in the United States of America was also know as "Narco" of Lexington, as well as the "Addiction Research Center". It is now home of a Federal Prison. The Allegheny Mountain Range (also spelled Alleghany and Allegany) -- informally, the Alleghenies -- is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range of the eastern United States. ... John Wesley Hunt (1773-1849) was a prominent businessman and early civic leader in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as President of the Confederate States of America for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... This is a list of U.S. federal prisons. ...


Geography

A prominent building in downtown Lexington.

Fayette County consists of 285.5 square miles, mostly gently rolling plateau, in the center of the inner Bluegrass Region. The area is noted for its beauty, fertile soil, excellent pastureland, and horse and stock farms. Poa pratensis (bluegrass) thrives on the limestone beneath the soil's surface, playing a major role in the area's scenic beauty and in the development of champion horses. Numerous small creeks rise and flow into the Kentucky River. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (413x607, 96 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (413x607, 96 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Bluegrass and rock fence of local limestone in central Kentucky. ... Binomial name Poa pratensis L. Smooth Meadow-grass (Poa pratensis) is a species of grass native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa. ... The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 259 mi (417 km) long, in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 739.5 km² (285.5 mi²). 736.9 km² (284.5 mi²) of it is land and 2.6 km² (1.0 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.35% water. [9] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Climate

Lexington is in the transition area between a humid continental climate and a humid subtropical climate. Summers are hot and humid, and winters are moderately cold with mild periods. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ...


The average temperature in Lexington is 54.9 °F (13 °C). Annual precipitation is 45.68 inches (1,200 mm). Lexington and the Bluegrass have four distinct seasons that include cool plateau breezes, moderate nights in the summer, and no prolonged periods of heat, cold, rain, wind, or snow. In mathematics, an average or central tendency of a set (list) of data refers to a measure of the middle of the data set. ...


Lexington has the dubious distinction of being recognized as a high allergy area by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America [10]. The results for the spring of 2006 rank Lexington at 75th. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure for and controlling asthma, food allergies, nasal allergies and other allergic diseases. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 76 80 83 88 92 101 103 103 103 91 83 75
Norm High °F 39.9 45.2 55.3 65.1 74 82.3 85.9 84.6 78.1 66.9 54.5 44.3
Norm Low °F 24.1 27.7 35.9 44.1 53.6 62.2 66.4 64.9 57.9 46.4 37.3 28.4
Rec Low °F -21 -15 -2 18 26 39 47 42 34 20 -3 -19
Precip (in) 3.34 3.27 4.41 3.67 4.78 4.58 4.81 3.77 3.11 2.7 3.44 4.03
Source: USTravelWeather.com [11]

Cityscape

Victorian Square Shoppes
Victorian Square Shoppes

Lexington features a diverse cityscape. From its vibrant downtown that features much-needed infill projects to its famed horse farms, the city prides itself in featuring an urban growth boundary that includes greenbelts and strict zoning definitions. This has been done to not only protect the Bluegrass landscape from further sprawling development, but to ensure that tourism, one of its leading industries, is not affected. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3488 × 2616 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3488 × 2616 pixel, file size: 2. ... A portion of downtown Lexington in 2006 Kincaid Towers along Vine Street. ... An urban growth boundary, or UGB, is a regional boundary, set in an attempt to control urbanization by designating the area inside the boundary for high density urban development and the area outside the boundary for low density rural development. ...


The city is home to several notable skyscrapers. The Lexington Financial Center is currently the tallest building, followed by Kincaid Towers, and then the World Trade Center complex. It is also home to many other notable structures, and to many new urban developments within two major districts. It also has many uncompleted projects, ranging from the 41 floor World Coal Center to an elevated park above Vine Street[3] and the Harrison Avenue viaduct. Looking down East Main Street in downtown Lexington. ... Kincaid Towers along Vine Street. ... The World Trade Center is a skyscraper in downtown Lexington, Kentucky bordered by South Mill, Vine and East Main Streets. ... The World Coal Center was a proposed skyscraper in Lexington, Kentucky where the Phoenix Hotel had once stood at South Limestone, East Main Street and East Vine Street [1]. The $100. ...


Planning

In 1958, the Urban Service Area and Rural Service Area was implemented as a way of controlling growth and urban sprawl through an urban growth boundary [4]. An Historic District Zoning Overlay was adopted as well to protect the historic character of the surrounding neighborhoods. In 1964, the minimum lot size in the Rural Service Area was established at 10-acres [4]. This was based upon the Health Department recommendations because the rural portions of the county rely upon individual on-site septic systems; the larger lot sizes would better protect the groundwater, the agricultural economy, and the rural environment. Two years, a comprehensive Design Plan for the downtown was completed [5], which called for the removal of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway lines on what is today's Vine Street. In 1967, the Urban Service Area shrunk; various zoning regulations were also amended from the original 1958 issue. Several years later, in 1973, the first Lexington Comprehensive Plan was completed. Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl) is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ... An urban growth boundary, or UGB, is a regional boundary, set in an attempt to control urbanization by designating the area inside the boundary for high density urban development and the area outside the boundary for low density rural development. ... Historic preservation, heritage management, or heritage conservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ...


In 1980, the Comprehensive Plan was updated and the Urban Service Area was modified to include Urban Activity Centers and Urban Activity Centers [5]. The Urban Activity Centers were commericial and light-industrial districts in urbanized areas, while Rural Activity Centers were retail trade and light-industrial centers clustered around the Interstate 64/Interstate 75 interchanges. In 1996, the Urban Service Area was expanded when 5,300 acres of the Rural Service Area was acquired through the Expansion Area Master Plan [4]. This was not without its controversy, as it was the first major update to the Comprehensive Plan in over a decade [5]. The Expansion Area Master Plan included impact fees, assessment districts, neighborhood design concepts, design overlays, mandatory greenways, major roadway improvements, stormwater management and open space mitigation for the first time; it also included a draft of the Rural Land Management Plan, which included large lot zoning and traffic impact controls. A pre-zoning of the entire expansion area was refuted in the Plan. A 50-acre minimum proposal was also defeated, although the mention of the proposal led to a deluge of 10-acre subdivisions in the Rural Service Areas [5]. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Three years after the expansion was initiated, the Rural Service Area Land Management Plan was adopted, which increased the minimum lot size in the agricultural rural zones to 40-acre minimums [4]. In 1998, a moratorium was issued on rural lot creations to curb the development of new rural 10-acre subdivisions that were incompatible with the existing agricultural uses. Two years later, the Purchase of Development Rights plan was adopted, which granted the city power to purchase the development rights of existing farms; in 2001, $40 million was allocated to the plan from a $25 million local, $15 million state grant [5]. An Infill and Redevelopment study was also initiated during that time, along with design guidelines for the areas surrounding the new Fayette County courthouses. Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Government and politics

In 1974, the governments of the city of Lexington and Fayette County, Kentucky combined to create the current Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. Lexington has an elected mayor and city council-style of government. Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Mayor

On November 7, 2006, Jim Newberry was elected Mayor of Lexington.[6] In January 2007, he succeeded Teresa Isaac, the city's mayor since 2000. During Isaac's tenure as Mayor, Lexington was the largest American city with an Arab-American mayor.[7] Jim Newberry was elected Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky on November 7, 2006. ... The Honorable Teresa Ann Isaac Teresa Ann Isaac is the current mayor of the Lexington Fayette Urban County Government, in Lexington, KY. Bio Mayor Isaac entered Lexington’s political scene as a candidate for the Urban County Council and won an At-Large seat in 1989. ...


Urban County Council

The Urban County Council is a fifteen-member legislative group. Twelve of the members represent specific districts and serve two-year terms; three are elected city-wide as at-large council members and serve four-year terms. The at-large member with the highest number of votes in the general election automatically becomes the Vice Mayor who, in the absence of the Mayor, is the presiding officer of the Council. The current council members are:

  • Jim Gray: Vice Mayor
  • Linda Gorton: At-Large
  • Chuck Ellinger II: At-Large
  • 1st District: Andrea James
  • 2nd District: Tom Blues
  • 3rd District: Dick DeCamp
  • 4th District: Julian Beard
  • 5th District: David Stevens
  • 6th District: Kevin Stinnett
  • 7th District: K. C. Crosbie
  • 8th District: George Myers
  • 9th District: Jay McChord
  • 10th District: Don Blevins
  • 11th District: Richard Moloney
  • 12th District: Ed Lane

Law enforcement

Primary law enforcement duties within Lexington are the responsibility of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Police. The Division of Police resulted from the merger of the Lexington Police Department with the Fayette County Patrol in 1974. The Fayette County Sheriff's Office is responsible for court service, including court security, prisoner transport, process and warrant service, and property tax collection. In addition, the University of Kentucky Police Department, the Transylvania University Department of Public Safety, Blue Grass Airport Public Safety, and the Kentucky Horse Park Police have jurisdiction within their geographic areas. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Blue Grass Airport (IATA: LEX, ICAO: KLEX, FAA LID: LEX) is a public airport located four miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Lexington, a city in Fayette County, Kentucky, United States. ... The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm and an educational theme park located in a rural area of Lexington, Kentucky in the United States. ...


Demographics

Calvary Baptist Church, Lexington
Calvary Baptist Church, Lexington

The estimated 2000 population of Lexington-Fayette was 260,512. The Lexington-Fayette Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) includes Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Jessamine, Scott, and Woodford counties. As of 2005, the MSA population stands at 429,889.[8] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x701, 105 KB) Summary Calvary Baptist Church, Lexington, KY http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x701, 105 KB) Summary Calvary Baptist Church, Lexington, KY http://www. ... Image File history File links CollegeoftheBible-LexKY.JPG‎ College of the Bible (now Lexington Theological Seminary), Photo from: Brown, John T., Churches of Christ, Louisville, KY: John P. Morton and Company, 1904 (also see Text and Photos hosted at Memorial Univeristy). ... Image File history File links CollegeoftheBible-LexKY.JPG‎ College of the Bible (now Lexington Theological Seminary), Photo from: Brown, John T., Churches of Christ, Louisville, KY: John P. Morton and Company, 1904 (also see Text and Photos hosted at Memorial Univeristy). ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Lexington Theological Seminary Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Bourbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Jessamine County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Scott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Woodford County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


The Lexington-Fayette-Frankfort-Richmond, KY Combined Statistical Area, established in 2005, had an estimated population of 635,547 in 2005. This includes the metro area and an additional seven counties, although Garrard County was excluded even though it is an important commuter county. [12]. The Lexington-Fayette-Frankfort-Richmond, KY Combined Statistical Area is the 76th largest Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of the United States. ... Garrard County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


As of the census2 of 2000, there were 260,512 people, 108,288 households, and 62,915 families residing in the city. The population density was 353.5/km² (915.6/mi²). There were 116,167 housing units at an average density of 157.6/km² (408.3/mi²). 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ...


The racial makeup of the city was:
81.04% White
13.48% African American
0.19% Native American
2.46% Asian
0.03% Pacific Islander
1.21% from other races
1.58% from two or more races
3.29% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 108,288 households out of which:
27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them
43.5% were married couples living together
11.5% had a female householder with no husband present
41.9% were non-families
31.7% of all households were made up of individuals
7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older For the record label, see Marriage Records. ...


The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.90.


The age distribution was:
21.3% under the age of 18
14.6% from 18 to 24
33.2% from 25 to 44
20.9% from 45 to 64
10.0% who were 65 years of age or older


The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $39,813, and the median income for a family was $58,677. Males had a median income of $36,166 versus $26,964 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,109. 12.9% of the population and 8.2% of families were below the poverty line, including 14.3% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those 65 and older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


There are over 230 churches, mosques and synagogues in Lexington, representing 38 denominations.

Sources:

  • 1790 to 1960 census: [9]
  • 1970 census: [10]
  • 1980 census: [11]
  • 1990 census: [12]
  • 2000 to 2005 census: [13]
  • 2006 census: [14]

Economy

See also: List of major employers in Lexington, Kentucky

Since the early 1950s, Lexington's economy has increasingly become a manufacturing, technology-oriented, and university oriented economy. There are three public universities, five private colleges, and two theological seminaries located within the Lexington CSA. In addition, the city plays an integral part in the region as being the leading medical and commercial center. With Lexington, Kentucky too far from any major navigatable rivers, it did not develop the heavy industry that often developed in other cities along major waterways, such as Cincinnati or Pittsburgh [1]. To counter this, Lexington put forth an effort to stay at the realm of modern technology in an... List of the major employers in Lexington, Kentucky: References ^ a b Major Employers. ...


As such, Lexington is home to several large corporations. There are two Fortune 500 companies located within the city: Affiliated Computer Services and Lexmark International, employing 1,200 and 3,450 respectively[15] United Parcel Service, Trane and Amazon.com, Inc. have a large presence in the city, and Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky is within the Lexington CSA in Georgetown. The city has a Jif peanut butter plant that produces more peanut butter than any other factory in the world. A corporation (usually known in the United Kingdom and Ireland as a company) is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... A BUNCH OF DOT HEADS go ahead change it again bitch! ... Lexmark is an American computer printer corporation founded in 1991 that was a spin-off of IBMs printer division. ... United Parcel Service Inc. ... Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, is a global provider of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and building management systems and controls. ... Amazon. ... Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK) is an automobile manufacturing factory in Georgetown, Kentucky. ... Georgetown is a city in Scott County, Kentucky, United States. ... Jar of creamy Jif. ... Peanut butter in a jar. ...


The University of Kentucky employs 10,668.[15] Not included in that tally is the College of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Service, which has a staff of over 900.[16] The University is the ninth largest economic company in the state of Kentucky, with an annual budget of $1.4 billion. The College of Medicine within the University is the 21st largest company in the state. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ...


Other sizeable employers rest with the government of Lexington-Fayette County and its hospital facilities. This includes the Fayette County Public Schools, employing 4,651, and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, employing 3,936. Central Baptist Hospital, St. Joseph Hospital, and the Veterans Administration Hospital employ 6,206 total. Fayette County Public Schools is a school district based in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


Education

See also: List of schools in Lexington, Kentucky

According to the United States Census, of Lexington's population over the age of twenty-five, 22.4% hold a bachelor's degree, 11.4% hold a master's degree, and 3.1% hold a professional degree. Just 2.6% hold a doctorate degree. Lexington was also ranked #10 in a list of America's most educated cities with a population of more than 250,000, ranked by percentage of bachelor's degrees among residents 25 and older.[17] Below is a listing of public and private schools for Lexington, Kentucky, USA. // Public schools The city is served by the Fayette County Public Schools district. ... 1880 US Census of Hoboken, New Jersey The United States Census is mandated by the United States Constitution[1]. The population is enumerated every 10 years and the results are used to allocate Congressional seats (congressional apportionment), electoral votes, and government program funding. ...


The city is served by the Fayette County Public Schools. The system consists of seven high schools, 11 middle schools, and 33 elementary schools. Three private schools also serve Lexington. Fayette County Public Schools is a school district based in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


The city also plays host to two traditional colleges, the University of Kentucky and Transylvania University. Other institutions of higher learning include Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Sullivan University, Spencerian College, Strayer University, and a newly opened distance learning extension of Indiana Wesleyan University. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC), located in Lexington, KY, is one of 16 two-year, open-admissions colleges of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). ... Sullivan University is a university based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Spencerian College is a career college in Louisville, Kentucky and Lexington, Kentucky. ... Strayer University, formerly Strayer College of Washington, D. C., is a private, for-profit educational institution. ... Indiana Wesleyan University (IWU) is a private Christian liberal arts college in Marion, Indiana that is affiliated with the evangelical Wesleyan Church. ...


Culture

The Lexington History Center in downtown Lexington.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (492x607, 92 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (492x607, 92 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Lexington History Center in downtown Lexington, Kentucky is the home of the Lexington History Museum, and the Lexington Public Safety Museum. ...

Annual cultural events and fairs

Lexington is home to many thriving arts organizations including a professional orchestra, two ballet companies, professional theatre, several museums including a basketball museum, several choral organizations and a highly respected opera program at the University of Kentucky. In addition, there are several events and fairs that draw people from throughout the Bluegrass.


Mayfest is a free outdoor festival that takes place annually over Mother's Day weekend. Held in Gratz park between the Carnegie Center and Transylvania University, the festival typically features up to 100 art and craft booths, live entertainment throughout the weekend, food, children's activities, adult activities and literary events, free carriage rides, a traditional Morris and Maypole dance and various demonstrations.


Taking part the first full weekend of June is the Festival of the Bluegrass, Kentucky's oldest bluegrass music festival. It includes three stages for music and a "music camp" that teaches the bluegrass music to school children. Also in June is the popular Broadway review presented by UK Opera Theatre, "It's A Grand Night for Singing!" The Festival of the Bluegrass, located in Lexington, Kentucky, is the oldest bluegrass music festival in the bluegrass region of Kentucky. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music which has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. ...


Lexingtonians gather downtown for the Fourth of July festivities which extend for several days. On July 3, the Gratz Park Historic District is transformed into an outdoor music hall when the Patriotic Music Concert is held on the steps of Morrison Hall at Transylvania University. The Lexington Singers and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra perform at this event. On the Fourth, annual festivities include a reading of the Declaration of Independence on the steps of the Old Courthouse, a waiter's race in Phoenix Park, a parade, a country music concert, and fireworks. Also, throughout the day street vendors sell their wares and food to the downtown visitors. The Fourth of July is considered to be the biggest holiday in Lexington. is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gratz Park Historic District is located in downtown Lexington, Kentucky. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...


"Southern Lights: Spectacular Sights on Holiday Nights" [13], taking place from November 18 to December 31, is held at the Kentucky Horse Park. It includes a three-mile drive through the park, showcasing numerous displays, many in character with the horse industry and history of Lexington. The "Mini-Train Express", an indoor petting exotic animal petting zoo, the International Museum of the Horse, an exhibit showcasing the Bluegrass Railway Club's model train, and Santa Claus are other major highlights. is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm and an educational theme park located in a rural area of Lexington, Kentucky in the United States. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ...


The Lexington Christmas Parade: Held usually the first Saturday in December, the parade route follows Main Street between Midland and Broadway. Festivities include a pre-parade "Santa's Sleigh" charity race, food, light entertainment, and post-show activities.


Other events and fairs include:

  • "It's A Grand Night for Singing" Presented by UK Opera, 2nd and 3rd weekends in June.
  • The Artists Market: A small display of arts and craft booths which is set up concurrently with the Farmer's Market each Saturday from the first weekend in June through the last weekend in August. Located on Vine Street opposite the Farmer's Market.
  • Thursday Night Live: An annual summer series of free, public concerts held in Cheapside Park every Thursday evening from 5pm - 7pm in June, July & August.
  • A Midsummer Night's Run, a 5K race in early August.
  • The Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra presents several annual concerts. [14]
  • The Kentucky Women's Writer's Conference which has hosted dozens of the nations foremost women writers.
  • Festival Latino in September
  • Gallery Hop, a seasonal event where the city's art galleries are open to the public on the third Friday of every third month.
  • Beaux Arts, a masquerade ball hosted by the University of Kentucky's School of Architecture.
  • "Thriller" re-enactment in which hundreds of people dress as zombies following a Michael Jackson character through the streets of downtown. Started in Halloween 2005, it hopes to become an annual event.
  • Tournament of Champions: one of three national high school debate championship tournaments featuring policy debate and Lincoln-Douglas debate. The best teams in the nation meet after qualifying during the regular season on the first weekend in May annually.

A masquerade ball (or masque) is an event which the participants attend in costume, usually including a mask. ...

Historical structures and museums

Lexington is home to numerous museums and historical structures. One of the most famous is Ashland: The Henry Clay Estate along Richmond Road east of downtown. This two-story museum is a National Historic Landmark and was the former home of statesman Henry Clay. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ...


Lexington Public Library, in the Phoenix Park area near the geographic center of Lexington, houses the world's largest ceiling clock, a five story Foucault pendulum and a frieze depicting the history of the horse in the Bluegrass. The library and its branches also house art galleries and traveling exhibits. The rotunda at the main library showing the Foucault pendulum The main branch of the Lexington Public Library system is Central Library along East Main Street connected to Park Plaza Apartments in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Foucaults Pendulum in the Panthéon, Paris. ...


Another important museum is the Lexington History Center in the old Fayette County Courthouse in the heart of downtown. It offers two museums, one dedicated to the history of the region and the other dedicated to public safety. A third museum, devoted to the history of pharmaceuticals in the Bluegrass, is under construction. It will also be home to the Isaac Scott Hathaway Museum in 2007 as well. The Lexington History Center in downtown Lexington, Kentucky is the home of the Lexington History Museum, and the Lexington Public Safety Museum. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmakos (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and logos (λόγος) meaning science) is the study of how substances interact with living organisms to produce a change in function. ...

The UK Art Museum is the premier art museum for Lexington and the only accredited museum in the region. It's collection of over 4000 objects ranges from Old Masters to Contemporary, and it also hosts ongoing special exhibitions. See www.uky.edu/art museum The Aviation Museum of Kentucky is an aviation museum located at the Blue Grass Airport in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Morgans at Hopemont, c1870. ... The Kentucky Theatre is an historic cinema in downtown Lexington, Kentucky that first opened in 1922. ... Lexington Cemetery (170 acres) is a private, non-profit cemetery and arboretum located at 833 W. Main Street, Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Martin Castle is a castle in Kentucky, outside Lexington, near the Woodford County line. ... Mary Todd Lincoln House at 578 West Main Street in Lexington, Kentucky was the family home of the future first lady and wife of the 16th President. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Rupp Arena is an arena located in downtown Lexington, Kentucky, USA. It is the centerpiece of Lexington Center, a convention and shopping facility owned by an arm of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Lexingtons consolidated city-county government. ...

Waveland State Historic Site in Lexington, Kentucky is the site of a Greek Revival home and plantation now maintained and operated as part of the Kentucky state park system. ...

Media

Lexington's largest daily circulating newspaper is the Lexington Herald-Leader. It is also home to another daily circulating newspaper, two weekly publications, several bi-weekly and monthly papers and The Lane Report, a monthly statewide business magazine. The region is also served by seven primary television stations, including WLEX, WKYT, WTVQ, The CW, and WKLE. The state's public television network, Kentucky Educational Television (KET), is headquartered in Lexington and is one of the nation's largest public networks. Lexington is also host to eighteen radio stations. Lexingtons largest daily circulating newspaper is the Lexington Herald-Leader. ... The Lexington Herald-Leader is a newspaper owned by The McClatchy Company and based in the U.S. city of Lexington, Kentucky. ... WLEX-TV 18 is the NBC station in Lexington, Kentucky, USA serving east central Kentucky. ... WKYT 27 is the CBS station in Lexington, Kentucky, serving the east-central part of Kentucky. ... WTVQ-TV 36 is the ABC station in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. It signed on as WBLG-TV in 1968 on Channel 62. ... The Crimson White, known colloquially as The CW, is the student-run newspaper of the University of Alabama. ... The Kentucky Educational Television network, a. ... The Kentucky Educational Television network is Kentuckys statewide public television network. ...


Parks and outdoor attractions

City parks and facilities

Lexington has over 40 general-use parks ranging in size from the .20 acre Smith Street Park to the 659 acre Masterson Station Park [18]. There are also six public golf courses at Avon, Kearney Links, Lakeside, Meadowbrook, Tates Creek and Picadome and three dog parks, at Jacobson, Masterson Station, and Coldstream. It also has two public 18-hole disc golf courses at Shillito Park and at Veterans Park, and a public skate park at Woodland Park, featuring 12,000 square feet of "ramps, platforms, bowls, and pipes." [18] These standard poodles are playing at a dog park. ... A player putting at Cass Benton Disc Golf Course; Northville, Michigan. ...


Horse racing tracks

Lexington is home to two historic horse racing tracks. Keeneland, sporting live races in April and October since 1936, is steeped in tradition where much has not changed since the track's opening. The Red Mile Harness Track is the oldest horse racing track in the city, and second oldest in the nation. This is where horses pull two-wheeled carts called sulkies while racing, also referred to as harness racing. The Kentucky Horse Park, located along scenic Iron Works Pike, is a relatively late-comer to Lexington, opening in 1978. It is a working horse farm and an educational theme park, along with holding the distinction of being a retirement home for some of the world's greatest competition horses. It will play host to the 2010 FEI World Equestrian Games. Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Keeneland Race Course at Dawn There is also a town in Jefferson County, Kentucky, with the same name, unrelated to this article; for the town, see Keeneland, Kentucky. ... The Red Mile is a horse racing track located in Lexington, KY. The track hosts harness racing, a type of horse racing in which the horses must pull two-wheeled carts called sulkies while racing. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm and an educational theme park located in a rural area of Lexington, Kentucky in the United States. ... The 2010 FEI World Equestrian Games will be held in Lexington, Kentucky from September 25 to October 10, 2010. ...


Natural areas

The city is home to Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, a 734-acre nature preserve along the Kentucky River Palisades [19][18]. There are 11 miles of back-country hiking trails that range from wheelchair-accessible paved trails to difficult single-track trails. The park is home to over 56 species of trees, 600 species of plants, 200 species of birds, and other wildlife. Remains of a grist mill, homestead and limekiln remain. The preserve also has a nature center and various educational programs throughout the year. The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 259 mi (417 km) long, in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


The Arboretum is a one-hundred-acre preserve adjacent to the University of Kentucky [18]. It features the Arboretum Woods, a small, 16-acrer Bluegrass Woodland patch that is home to eighteen native Kentucky tree species, and more than 50 native Kentucky grasses and herbs. It also has 1,500 varieties of roses in the Rose Garden, a Home Demonstration Garden, and numerous paved paths and trails. The University of Kentucky Arboretum (40 hectares or 100 acres) is located in Lexington, Kentucky, USA, and open to the public dawn to dusk every day of the year. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


The city also plays host to the historic McConnell Springs, a 26-acre park within the industrial confines off of Old Frankfort Pike.[19][18] There are two miles of trails that surround the namesake springs, historic dry-laid stone fences, and historical structures.


Sports

Lexington is home to the Lexington Legends, a Class A minor league affiliate of the Houston Astros. Since its creation in 2001, Lexington has produced three major leaguers, the first being John Buck (Catcher) who plays for the Kansas City Royals, followed by Kirk Saarloos (Starting Pitcher) who is with the Cincinnati Reds and Mike Gallo (Relief Pitcher), who is currently with the Colorado Rockies. The Legends belong to the SAL (South Atlantic League), have one league title (2001) and 4 playoff appearances since 2001. Future Hall of Fame hurler Roger Clemens pitched in one game for the Legends in 2006 as part of his preparation to return to the Houston Astros. The Lexington Legends, who play in Lexington, Kentucky, are a Class A minor league baseball team affiliated with the Houston Astros, in the South Atlantic League. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Johnathan R. Buck (born July 7, 1980 in Kemmerer, Wyoming) is an American Major League Baseball player for the Kansas City Royals. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... Kirk Craig Saarloos (born May 23, 1979 in Long Beach, California) is a right-handed major-league pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames Big Red Machine, Redlegs[1] Ballpark... Michael Dwain Gallo, born in Long Beach, California, on April 2, 1977, is a baseball pitcher for the Houston Astros. ... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) West Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Colorado Rockies (1993–present) Other nicknames The Rocks, The Rox, Blake Street Bombers Ballpark Coors Field (1995–present) Mile High Stadium (1993-1994) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None NL Pennants... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), nicknamed The Rocket, is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent Major League baseball pitchers of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ...


The Lexington Horsemen are an indoor football team in the United Indoor Football league. The Lexington Horsemen are a professional Indoor football team. ... United Indoor Football is an indoor American football league that was started in 2005. ...


The University of Kentucky fields 22 varsity sports teams, most of which compete in the Southeastern Conference. The most famous team by far is the men's basketball team, led by head coach Billy Gillispie. The Kentucky Men's Basketball team has won 7 NCAA Championships and is the winningest program in college basketball history. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Billy Clyde Gillispie (born November 7, 1959, in Abilene, Texas[1]) is the mens head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky. ...


Transylvania University competes in NCAA Division III athletics. Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Lexington was also home to the Kentucky Thoroughblades, a minor league (AHL) hockey team that played between 1996 and 2001. From 2002-2003, the ECHL Men O' War played minor league hockey in Lexington. The Kentucky Thoroughblades were an American Hockey League franchise that existed from 1996 to 2001 in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is regarded as the top professional hockey league in North America outside the National Hockey League (NHL) for which it serves as the primary developmental circuit. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... The Lexington Men O War were an ECHL hockey team that played at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky from 2002-2003. ...


In addition, Lexington is home to two horse racing tracks. At Keeneland, thoroughbred horses race while at The Red Mile harness racing is the featured competition. It is also home to the Rolex Kentucky Three Day, one of the top 5 annual equestrian eventing competitions in the world. Keeneland Race Course at Dawn There is also a town in Jefferson County, Kentucky, with the same name, unrelated to this article; for the town, see Keeneland, Kentucky. ... Thoroughbred race horses The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known as a race horse. ... The Red Mile is a horse racing track located in Lexington, KY. The track hosts harness racing, a type of horse racing in which the horses must pull two-wheeled carts called sulkies while racing. ... The Rolex Kentucky Three Day is an eventing competition held at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Eventing is an equestrian event which comprises dressage, cross-country and show-jumping. ...


Transportation

Highways

Lexington is serviced by both Interstate 64 and Interstate 75, though neither they nor any other freeway run through the city proper. New Circle Road (KY 4) acts as an inner-beltway around the city, Man o' War Boulevard is a semi outer-beltway south of New Circle Road, and numerous U.S. routes and arterial highways radiate out from downtown to provide access to the numerous bedroom communities ringing the metropolitan area. Citation Boulevard is planned to provide some relief to northern New Circle between Leestown Road and Russell Cave Road. Lexington suffers considerable traffic congestion for a city of its size due to the lack of out- or inbound freeways, the proximity of the University of Kentucky to downtown, and the substantial number of commuters from outlying towns. Lexington, Kentucky is strategically located at the intersection of Interstate 64 and Interstate 75. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... New Circle Road is the common name of KY 4, a Kentucky state highway that serves as an inner beltway around Lexington, which is part of the consolidated city-county government with Fayette County. ... Man o War Boulevard, named after the legendary racehorse, is a four-lane urban arterial with curbs and sidewalks its entire length, circling Lexington, Kentucky to its south. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Commuting is the process of travelling from a place of residence to a place of work. ...


Air

See also: Comair Flight 5191

Lexington is accessible by air with approximately 65 direct and nonstop flights daily from the two runways of Blue Grass Airport. Six major airlines operate connection serice of Blue Grass, including American Eagle, Delta Air Lines, Continental Express, Northwest Airlink, United Express, and US Airways Express. Comair Flight 5191 was a domestic U.S. flight from Lexington, Kentucky, to Atlanta, Georgia, operated on behalf of Delta Connection by Comair. ... Blue Grass Airport (IATA: LEX, ICAO: KLEX, FAA LID: LEX) is a public airport located four miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Lexington, a city in Fayette County, Kentucky, United States. ... American Eagle can refer to: American Eagle Airlines American Eagle Outfitters, an American clothing retailer AMC Eagle car (also known as American Eagle) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Continental Express (IATA: n/a, ICAO: BTA, and Callsign: Jet Link) is the operating name of ExpressJet Airlines for Continental Airlines. ... Northwest Airlink is the name of Northwest Airlines commuter airline subsidiaries, flying turboprops and regional jets from Northwests domestic hubs in Minneapolis, Detroit, and Memphis. ... United Express is a brand name under which nine regional airlines operate feeder flights for United Airlines from small markets to Uniteds domestic hub airports. ... US Airways Express is a brand name used by several airlines which provide feederliner service for US Airways from smaller markets in the United States, Canada, and the Bahamas to its major stations at Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Philadelphia International Airport, Pittsburgh International Airport, New York Citys LaGuardia Airport...


The airport is located four miles (six km) west of the city along US 60 (Versailles Road). U.S. Highway 60 is an east-west United States highway, running 2,670 miles (4,300 km) from Virginia to Arizona. ...


Public transportation

Prior to today's public transit city bus system, LexTran, Lexington was served by numerous private transit systems. The first such system was the Lexington Railway Company omnibuses which began operation in 1874 [20] that used horse-drawn stagecoaches. The name changed to the Lexington Street Railway Company soon after to avoid confusion with the steam railroads. In 1890, the system was upgraded to streetcars and was referred to as the Kentucky Traction and Terminal Company. The streetcars ceased operations in 1938 when they were replaced by motorized buses under the Lexington Railway System name, which later became the Lexington Transit Corporation.


By the early 1970s, expenses associated with the operation of the motorized buses soon outstripped revenue for the Lexington Transit Corporation [20]. In April 1972, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government incorporated the system under the local government and renamed the system LexTran. In 1997, LexTran introduced the Lexington Bluegrass Mobility Office [21]. It offers carpooling and vanpooling computer ridematching services and Lex Van, a work commute vanpool leasing program. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Today, LexTran operates eight routes from 5:30 AM to 11:20 PM seven-days-a-week from the Lexington Transit Center along Vine Street in downtown. In 2004, the system received additional funding from a successful ballot initiative to implement a new property tax dedicated to helping fund the LexTran system [22]. Since the tax referendum passed, LexTran's system has grown by 50% and the number of passenger boardings and operators more than doubled. The bus fleet will increase from 53 as of May 2007 to 60 by August 2007 as well. The Lexington Transit Center is a one-story public transportation facility with an underground parking garage along Vine Street east of South Limestone in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


For 2007, LexTran is poised to receive several upgrades to its fleet of buses and facilities [22]. A renovation and expansion of the main LexTran facilities on East Loudon Avenue, expected to cost $7.5 million, has $4 million already secured. LexTran is also seeking $3.1 million for new buses, $1.5 million for an Automated Vehicle Locator, and $800,000 to purchase new fare boxes. Phase one of the expansion project includes the construction of a new bus fuel and wash building at 109 West Loudon Avenue, along with upgrades to the restrooms and break room at the Lexington Transit Center. The Lexington Transit Center is a one-story public transportation facility with an underground parking garage along Vine Street east of South Limestone in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


Transportation planning

The Lexington Area Metropolitan Planning Organization is responsible for transportation planning for Fayette and Jessamine Counties. This includes activities such as carpool matching, administering a commuter vanpool program, air quality forecasting, bicycle and pedestrian planning, congestion management, and developing transportation plans and documents. The Lexington Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) has been involved with transportation planning since being established in 1974. ...


Sister cities

Lexington has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

All four are, like Lexington, major centers of the thoroughbred breeding industry in their respective countries. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Deauville is a commune of the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie région, in France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Shizunai (静内町; -chou) was a town located in Shizunai District, Hidaka, Hokkaido, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Newmarket is a market town in the English county of Suffolk,approximately 65 miles (105 kilometres) north of London, which has grown and become famous because of its connection with race horses and Thoroughbred horse racing at Newmarket Racecourse. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Thoroughbred race horses The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known as a race horse. ...


See also

Following are famous people and celebrities who were either born/raised or have lived for a significant period of time in the Lexington, Kentucky metropolitan area: References ^ a b (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Lexington was briefly Kentucky's largest city by 10,000 people, from the 2000 Census until January 1, 2003, when Louisville merged with Jefferson County.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Davis, Merlene. "Architects design park to be built over viaduct." 11 October 1984. Herald-Leader [Lexington]. 16 November 2006.
  4. ^ a b c d Lexington-Fayette Urban County, Kentucky (2003-04-17). Greenbrier Small Area Plan. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  5. ^ a b c d e Lexington-Fayette Urban County, Kentucky. Planning History. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  6. ^ "Isaac concedes to Newberry for Lexington Mayor." Herald-Leader [Lexington]. 7 November 2006 [2].
  7. ^ The Arab American Institute web site.
  8. ^ Lexington, KY MSA Population. Census Bureau. 28 August 2006 [3].
  9. ^ Hillery Jr., George A. (1966). "Population Growth in Kentucky, 1820-1960". University of Kentucky Agriculture Experiment Station. 
  10. ^ (1973) "1970 Census of the Population, Volume 1: Characteristics of the Population, Part 19, Kentucky". United States Government Printing Office. 
  11. ^ (1982) "1980 Census of the Population, Volume 1: Characteristics of the Population, Part 19, Kentucky". United States Government Printing Office. 
  12. ^ ""KSDC News"", Kentucky State Data Center, Spring 1997. 
  13. ^ "Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky - Population finder". United States Census Bureau.
  14. ^ Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  15. ^ a b Major Employers. Commerce Lexington. 31 August 2006 [4].
  16. ^ University of Kentucky Facts At A Glance. University of Kentucky. 31 August 2006 [5].
  17. ^ Christie, Les. "America's smartest cities." CNNMoney. 31 August 2006. 2 Sept. 2006 [6].
  18. ^ a b c d e (2007) Fun Guide 2007. City of Lexington, Kentucky, Division of Parks and Recreation. 
  19. ^ a b Parks. Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. 31 August 2006 [7].
  20. ^ a b History of Transit in Lexington. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  21. ^ LexVan Rideshare Information. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  22. ^ a b "Fruitful trip to the hill", 2007-04-16, pp. 01-02. Retrieved on 2007-05-07. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lexington, Kentucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2977 words)
Lexington, Kentucky, United States, known as the "Horse Capital of the World," is located in the heart of the Bluegrass region.
Lexington has the dubious distinction of being recognized as the #1 worst city for spring allergies in the fall of 2005 by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America [8].
Lexington's urban development patterns, confined within an urban growth boundary that protects its famed horse farms, includes greenbelts and expanse land between it and the surrounding towns.
Lexington, Kentucky (449 words)
Lexington, the seat of Fayette county, was named in 1775 for the Battle of Lexington (Massachusetts) by explorers camped at McConnell Springs near the Town Branch of South Elkhorn Creek, west of what is now downtown Lexington.
The population of Lexington in 2000 was 260,512.
Lexington is situated in the centre of what the Kentuckians affirm to be the finest body of land in the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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