FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lewis gun
Lewis Gun

Recruits of the Singapore Volunteer Force training with a Lewis gun.
Type Light machine gun
Place of origin Flag of the United States United States
Service history
Used by UK, Commonwealth, Belgium, United States, Germany
Wars World War I, World War II
Production history
Designer Samuel McClean
Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis
Designed 1911
Specifications
Weight 28 lb (12.7 kg)
Length 38 in (965 mm)
Barrel length 26.5 in (665 mm)

Cartridge .303 British (7.7x56mmR)
.30-06 Springfield
Action Gas operated
Rate of fire 550 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 2450 ft/s (746.76 m/s)
Feed system 47 or 97-round drum magazine

The Lewis Gun is a pre-World War I era squad automatic weapon/machine gun of American design that was most widely used by the forces of the British Empire. It was first used in combat with the Belgian Army in World War I, and continued in service all the way through to World War II. It is visually distinctive because of a wide tubular cooling shroud around the barrel and top mounted pan magazines. The Straits Settlements Volunteer Force (SSVF) was a military reserve force in the Straits Settlements, while they were under British rule. ... The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, one of the most popular modern 5. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... Isaac Newton Lewis (born: New Salem, Pennsylvania 12th October 1858 - died: Hoboken, New Jersey, 9th November 1931) was an American soldier and inventor. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... .303 cartridge The . ... .30-06 Springfield cartridge specifications. ... In firearms terminology, an action is the system of operation that the firearm employs to seal the breech (in a breech-loading firearm), and to load consecutive rounds. ... Gas-operated firearm. ... (for paintball markers also)Rate of fire is the frequency at which a specific weapon can fire or launch its projectiles. ... A guns muzzle velocity is the speed at which the projectile leaves the muzzle of the gun. ... A drum magazine. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A squad automatic weapon (SAW) is a light or general-purpose machine gun, usually equipped with a bipod and firing a 7. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Flag of Belgium The Land Component, formerly the Belgian Army, is the land-based armed force of the Belgian Armed Forces. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A 30-round STANAG magazine. ...

Contents

History

The Lewis Gun or Lewis Automatic Machine Rifle was invented by U.S. Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis in 1911, based on initial work by Samuel Maclean. Despite its origins, the Lewis Gun was not instantly adopted by the Americans. This may have been due to a clash of personalities with the U.S. Army's Chief of Ordnance. It had a cyclic rate of approximately 550 rounds per minute. For this reason, the gun had a 9 yard ammunition belt-giving birth to the phrase 'the whole nine yards'. The gun weighed 28 lb (12.7 kg), only about half as much as a typical medium machine gun of the era, such as the Vickers machine gun, and was primarily chosen because it could be carried and used by a single soldier. The Lewis Gun was therefore more mobile than heavy machine guns and could much more easily follow the troops during advances and retreats, but it was still a bit heavy for its intended role. It was also relatively cheap at about one sixth the cost of a Vickers, and was issued in large numbers to soldiers serving on the Western Front. In total only 62 parts made up the gun (six Lewis Guns could be produced in the same time as a Vickers gun due to the excessive complexity of the Vickers lockwork). The lighter weight of the Lewis Gun made it popular as an aircraft mounted weapon, especially since the cooling effect of the high speed air over the gun meant that the radiator and cooling fins could be removed, making the weapon even lighter. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Isaac Newton Lewis (born: New Salem, Pennsylvania 12th October 1858 - died: Hoboken, New Jersey, 9th November 1931) was an American soldier and inventor. ... The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled . ... Combatants Belgium British Empire Australia[1] Canada[2] India[3] Newfoundland[4] New Zealand[5] South Africa[6] United Kingdom France and French Overseas Empire Portugal[7] United States Germany Commanders No unified command until 1918, then Ferdinand Foch Moltke → Falkenhayn → Hindenburg and Ludendorff → Hindenburg and Groener Casualties ~4,800...


Design

The Lewis Gun was gas operated. A portion of the expanding gases was tapped off from the barrel. This drove a piston to the rear against a spring. The piston was fitted with a vertical post at its rear which rode in a helical cam track in the bolt, rotating it at the end of its travel nearest the breech. This allowed the three locking lugs at the rear of the bolt to engage into recesses in the gun's body to lock it into place. The post also carried a fixed firing pin, which protruded through an aperture in the front of the bolt to fire the next round at the foremost part of the piston's travel. For other uses, see CAM. Animation showing rotating cams and cam followers producing reciprocating motion. ... The firing pin is a very hard steel rod with a one small, rounded end for striking the primer of a cartridge. ...


It was designed with an aluminum barrel-casing to use the muzzle blast to draw air into the gun and cool down the internal mechanism. There is some discussion over whether the cooling tube was effective or even necessary. In the Second World War many old aircraft guns which did not have the tubing were issued to anti-aircraft units of the British Home Guard and to British airfields, and were found to function properly without it. Later, more aircraft guns were used on vehicle mounts in the heat of the Western Desert and again did not suffer without the tube. The Royal Navy however, insisted all their Lewis Guns had to retain the tubing, even in the cold of the Arctic. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Flak” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Airport (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ...

List of parts
List of parts

The Lewis Gun utilized two different drum magazines, one holding 47 and the other 97 rounds (the picture below shows the 47 round version). The 97 round magazine was designed for aircraft use and was considered too heavy for infantry use. A few Lewis Guns were issued for anti-aircraft use with the 97 round drums by the British Army in 1916, but the big drum did not stand up well to the arduous conditions of trench warfare and the 47 round was used thereafter. The aircraft type of magazine had to be carefully stored when used with ground mounts as the underside was open and exposed the ammunition to dust, dirt or spray, which was then carried into the gun mechanism. Interestingly, the Lewis was considered very reliable despite this design fault, but then this may have been in comparison to other less reliable designs like the notorious Chauchat. Unlike other drum magazine designs, the Lewis' drum was not wound against a spring but was mechanically driven by a cam on top of the bolt which operated a pawl mechanism via a lever. A 30-round STANAG magazine. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Chauchat (pronounced show-shah) was a light machine gun used mainly by the French Army but also by seven other nations, including the USA, during and after World War I. Its formal designation in the French Army was Fusil-Mitrailleur Mle 1915 CSRG. It was also known as the... Pawl was a Formula One constructor (Indy 500 only) in 1951, 1954 and 1955. ...


An interesting point of the design was that it did not use a traditional longitudinal coiled spring, but used a spiral spring, much like a big clock spring, in a semi-circular housing just in front of the trigger. The operating rod had a toothed underside, which engaged with a cog which wound the spring. When the gun fired a round, the bolt recoiled and the cog was turned, tightening the spring until the resistance of the spring had reached the recoil force of the bolt assembly. At that moment, as the gas pressure in the breech fell, the spring unwound, turning the cog, which, in turn, wound the operating rod forward for the next round. As with a clock spring, the Lewis Gun's recoil spring had an adjustment device to adjust the recoil resistance for variations in temperature and wear. Unusual as it seems, the design proved enduringly reliable.


Service

Australian Soldiers firing at enemy planes during World War I.
Australian Soldiers firing at enemy planes during World War I.
Men of 28th Battalion of the 2nd Australian Division lying prone on the ground to practice Lewis gun drill at Renescure.
Men of 28th Battalion of the 2nd Australian Division lying prone on the ground to practice Lewis gun drill at Renescure.

Colonel Lewis became frustrated with trying to persuade the U.S. Army to adopt his design. He retired and headed for Belgium. The Belgians quickly adopted the design in 1913, using the .303 British round. Not long after that the Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) purchased a licence to manufacture it. The Germans first encountered the Lewis in 1914 and nicknamed it "the Belgian Rattlesnake". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x965, 258 KB) Taken by Capt. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x965, 258 KB) Taken by Capt. ... Image File history File links Description: THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES (PASSCHENDAELE) 31 JULY - 10 NOVEMBER 1917 Men of 28th Battalion of the 2nd Australian Division lying stretched on the ground to practice Lewis gun drill at Renescure Source: IWMCollections IWM Photo No. ... Image File history File links Description: THE THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES (PASSCHENDAELE) 31 JULY - 10 NOVEMBER 1917 Men of 28th Battalion of the 2nd Australian Division lying stretched on the ground to practice Lewis gun drill at Renescure Source: IWMCollections IWM Photo No. ... The Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) was a British manufacturer of vehicles, firearms, and military equipment, and still exists as an airgun sport manufacturer and distributor. ...


World War I

The British adopted it not long after the Belgians late in 1914. Each Lewis Gun required a team of two gunners, one to fire and one to carry ammunition and reload, and the whole rifle squad was trained to fire it in case the gunners were incapacitated.


The early British Mark IV tanks used the Lewis Gun. It was used on British aircraft either as an observer's or gunner's weapon or as an additional primary weapon to the more common Vickers machine gun. Due to its open bolt firing cycle, it proved to be impossible to synchronise it to fire through a spinning propeller, so that the heavier Vickers gun had to be used for this purpose. Because of this, the Lewis was fitted on S.E.5as above the top wing in a Foster mount, which was outside of the propeller's arc, and allowed the gun to be swung down on a rail to allow the magazine to be changed in flight. For the use of aircraft gunners, the Lewis was mounted in a Scarff ring, which allowed the gun to be rotated and elevated whilst supporting the gun's weight. The Lewis has claim to being the first machine gun fired from a plane. A Mark I tank on 26 September 1916 (moving left to right). ... Damaged propeller from a Sopwith Baby aircraft circa 1916/17 with evidence of bulletholes from a machine gun fired behind the propeller without an Interruptor. ... The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 was a British biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War. ... In early 1916 Sergeant Foster of No. ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ... A Scarff ring was a machine gun mount used on aircraft in the First World War. ...


In 1917, the U.S. Army adopted the Lewis Gun in the .30-06 caliber, but the design was soon replaced in September 1918 by the Browning Automatic Rifle. The Browning Automatic Rifle (commonly known as the BAR; properly pronounced bee ay are) is a family of automatic rifles (or machine rifles) and light machine guns used by the United States and other countries during the 20th century. ...


The Russian Empire bought significant number of Lewis Guns in British .303 or Russian 7.62x54R calibre and used it as squad automatic weapon for infantry units, or as GPMG for cavalry, cossack, or dragoon units. These guns were replaced by the Degtyarev light machine gun from the late 1920s. The Lewis had reputation of being a somewhat cumbersome, but fairly reliable weapon. Some Lewis Guns were briefly re-issued in Autumn 1941 to make up for losses of equipment to the advancing Germans. They were withdrawn from service in 1942-1943, as more DPs became available. Anthem Hymn of the Russian Federation Capital (and largest city) Moscow Official languages Russian official throughout nation; thirty others co-official in various regions Government Semi-presidential federal republic  -  President Vladimir Putin  -  Prime Minister Mikhail Fradkov Formation  -  Declared June 12, 1990   -  Finalized December 25, 1991  Area  -  Total 17,075,400... The 7. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dragoon (disambiguation). ... The Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyareva pekhotnyi (Degtyarev hand-held infantry machine gun) was a light machine gun used by the Soviet Union starting in 1928. ... The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ...


The Germans also used captured Lewis guns (rechambered for German rounds) after the Battle of the Somme. The Lewis remained in use in these units until the formation of the Maschinen-Gewehr Scharfschützen battalions, in April 1918. However, the stormtrooper battalions seem to have liked the Lewis gun so much that many retained them in preference to the later light machine guns produced by the Germans. Lewis guns remained in frontline service until the end of the war, with captured weapons repaired and converted in a factory in Brussels.


World War II

In World War II, it was replaced by the Bren gun for most infantry uses, but the Lewis saw continued service on Royal Navy warships and submarines. Additionally, it was used as a vehicle-mounted weapon, primarily as a side gunner's weapon on aircraft. Although it was probably obsolete for that role as well, the British were facing something of a major economic crisis during the war, and had to use their existing stocks of Lewis guns for purposes such as airfield defense. The Bren (from Brno (the Czechoslovakian town of design) and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of squad automatic weapon/light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles into the 1980s. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ...


In the crisis following the Fall of France, Lewis guns were used to arm the British Home Guard. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


After World War II, the Lewis was officially discontinued in British Service, and all existing models were retired in favour of the Bren, Vickers and other machine guns. The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled . ...


Additionally, the German FG 42 borrowed significant design elements from the Lewis Gun. The Fallschirmjagergewehr 42, shown with magazine and detachable bayonet. ...


See also

World War I started on 28th of July 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Lewis Gun
  • Scans of Lewis gun manual of 1917
  • Video footage of a Lewis gun being fired

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

References

Small arms captured in Fallujah, Iraq by the US Marine Corps in 2004 The term small arms generally describes any number of smaller infantry weapons, such as firearms that an individual soldier can carry. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Peoples Republic of China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee... The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963. ... Enfield No. ... The Browning Hi-Power is a semi-automatic, single-action, 9 mm pistol. ... The Smith & Wesson Military & Police revolver is a . ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... The MP5 is a third-generation submachine gun that is widely used by law enforcement tactical teams and military forces. ... Lee-Enfield No4 Mk1 with bayonet, scabbard attached The Lee-Enfield was the British armys standard bolt action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle from 1895 until 1956. ... Jungle Carbine was an informal term used for the Rifle No. ... Line drawing of Guppy 13 pocket cruiser The De Lisle carbine was a British rifle used during World War II. It was based on a Lee_Enfield rifle converted to . ... This article is about the submachine gun. ... The Lanchester was a submachine gun used by the British during World War II. History In 1940, with the Dunkirk evacuation completed, the Royal Air Force decided to adopt some form of submachine gun for airfield defense. ... The Mark I Austen was a 9 millimeter Australian submachine gun developed during the Second World War by the Lithgow Small Arms Factory. ... The Owen Gun, which was known officially as the Owen Machine Carbine, was an Australian submachine gun designed by Evelyn (Evo) Owen in 1939. ... A . ... The Bren (from Brno, the Czechoslovak city of design, and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles until 1991. ... The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled . ... The Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank, was one of the earlier anti-tank weapons using a high explosive anti-tank projectile. ... The Rifle, Anti-Tank, .55in, Boys commonly known as the Boys or often and incorrectly Boyes Anti-tank Rifle was a British anti-tank rifle. ... The Ordnance SBML 2-inch Mortar, or more commonly just 2-inch Mortar, was a British mortar issued to the British Army and the Commonwealth armies that saw use during the Second World War and later. ... The United Kingdoms Ordnance ML 3 inch mortar was the standard mortar used by the British army from the late Twenties to the late Sixties. ... The Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 (nicknamed Lifebuoy from the shape of the fuel tank), also known as the Ack Pack, was a British design of flamethrower for infantry use in the Second World War. ... A hand grenade is a hand-held bomb, made to be thrown by a soldier. ... Mills bomb is the popular name for a series of prominent British hand grenades. ... Small arms captured in Fallujah, Iraq by the US Marine Corps in 2004 The term small arms generally describes any number of smaller infantry weapons, such as firearms that an individual soldier can carry. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ball and hollowpoint 9mm Luger rounds The 9 mm Luger pistol cartridge (9 x 19 mm Parabellum, 9 x 19 mm NATO) was designed by firearms designer Georg Luger. ... .45 ACP cartridges .45 redirects here. ... . ... . ... Left to right: .38 Special, .17 HMR and . ... .50 BMG rounds and 20MM Vulcan round, with a golf ball and a stick of RAM posed to provide scale. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... A pistol is a usually small, projectile weapon, normally fired with one hand. ... The Beaumont-Adams Revolver was a . ... The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963. ... Enfield No. ... The Browning Hi-Power is a semi-automatic, single-action, 9 mm pistol. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... Short Land Service musket Brown Bess is a nickname of unknown origin for the British Armys Land Pattern Musket and its derivatives. ... British Ferguson Rifle The Ferguson rifle was most likely the first breech loading rifle to be adopted by any organized military force. ... The Infantry Rifle, known since the Victorian era as the Baker rifle, was, in addition to the Hompesch rifle used by the 5th Battalion/60th Regiment of Foot, the flintlock rifle used by the Rifle regiments of the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars. ... The Enfield 1853 Rifled Musket (also known as the Pattern 1853 Enfield, P53 Enfield, and Enfield Rifled Musket) was a . ... SNIDER-ENFIELD BREECH LOADING RIFLE. The British . ... The MP5 is a third-generation submachine gun that is widely used by law enforcement tactical teams and military forces. ... The Lanchester was a submachine gun used by the British during World War II. History In 1940, with the Dunkirk evacuation completed, the Royal Air Force decided to adopt some form of submachine gun for airfield defense. ... This article is about the submachine gun. ... The Sterling submachine gun is a British submachine gun which was in service with the British Army from 1953 until 1988 when it was phased out with the introduction of the L85A1 IW (Individual Weapon). ... A . ... An 1865 Gatling gun. ... An early Maxim gun in operation with the Royal Navy 1895 . ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled . ... The Bren (from Brno, the Czechoslovak city of design, and Enfield, the location of the British Royal Small Arms Factory), usually called the Bren Gun, was a series of light machine guns adopted by Britain in the 1930s and used in various roles until 1991. ... Anti-tank, or simply AT, refers to any method of combating military armored fighting vehicles, notably tanks. ... Ordnance QF 2 pounder Type Anti-tank gun Nationality UK Era WW2 Target armoured vehicles History Date of design 1936 Production period 1936 - Number built Service duration 1936-1945 Operators War service WW2 Specifications Carriage Calibre 40 mm Barrel length 50 calibres Weight 130 kg Ammunition AP Shell weight 2... QF 6 pounder anti-tank gun in Batey ha-Osef museum, Israel. ... The Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank, was one of the earlier anti-tank weapons using a high explosive anti-tank projectile. ... The Rifle, Anti-Tank, .55in, Boys commonly known as the Boys or often and incorrectly Boyes Anti-tank Rifle was a British anti-tank rifle. ... The L6 Wombat, (Weapon Of Magnesium, Batallion, Anti-Tank) was a 120 mm calibre recoilless anti-tank rifle used by the British armed forces. ... A field gun is an artillery piece. ... Ordnance QF 25 pounder Type gun-howitzer Nationality UK Era World War II Target general use + anti-tank History Date of design 1930s Production period Number built Service duration 1930s to 1967 Operators War service Specifications Carriage Fixed trail Calibre 3. ... The Congreve Rocket was a British military weapon designed by Sir William Congreve in 1804. ... The Ordnance SBML 2-inch Mortar, or more commonly just 2-inch Mortar, was a British mortar issued to the British Army and the Commonwealth armies that saw use during the Second World War and later. ... The United Kingdoms Ordnance ML 3 inch mortar was the standard mortar used by the British army from the late Twenties to the late Sixties. ... The Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 (nicknamed Lifebuoy from the shape of the fuel tank), also known as the Ack Pack, was a British design of flamethrower for infantry use in the Second World War. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lewis Gun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (976 words)
The gun weighed 12 kg (28 lb), only about half as much as a typical machine gun of the era such as the Vickers machine gun, and was primarily chosen because it could be carried and used by a single soldier.
A few Lewis guns were issued for anti-aircraft use with the 97 round drums by the British Army in 1916, but the big drum did not stand up well to the arduous conditions of trench warfare and the 47 round was used thereafter.
When the gun fired a round, the bolt recoiled and the cog was turned, tightening the spring until the resistance of the spring had reached the recoil force of the bolt.
Lewis Gun (232 words)
The gun weighed only about half as much as the monumental Vickers machine gun[?] and was primarily chosen because it could be carried and used by a single soldier.
In WW2 it was replaced by the Bren gun for most infantry uses, but the Lewis saw continued service as a vehicle mounted weapon, primarily as a side gunner's weapon on aircraft.
After WWII the Lewis was officially discontinued and all existing models were retired in favor of the Bren and other models.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m