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Encyclopedia > Lewis Morris

Lewis Morris (April 8, 1726January 22, 1798) was an American landowner and developer from Morrisania, New York. He signed the U.S. Declaration of Independence as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New York. April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Morrisania is a neighborhood in the southwestern section of the Bronx in New York City. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to three successive bodies of representatives: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774 to October 26, 1774. ...


This Morris was the third to be named Lewis, and was born on the family estate of Morrisania. He was the son of Lewis and Katrintje (Staats) Moris. His great grandfather (Robert, died 1672) had immigrated to New York through Barbados after being part of Oliver Cromwell's army in the English Civil War of 1648. He purchased the first tract of land in The Bronx that became the basis for the Morrisania manor. His grandfather Lewis Morris (1671-1746) expanded and patented the estate. Lewis attended Yale, and graduated in 1746. When his father (also Lewis) died in 1762, he inherited the bulk of the estate. Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... The term English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between English Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. ... // Events January 17 - Englands Long Parliament passes the Vote of No Address, breaking off negotiations with King Charles I and thereby setting the scene for the second phase of the English Civil War. ... Main article: New York City The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... Lewis Morris (October 15, 1671 - May 21, 1746), chief justice of New York and British governor of New Jersey, was the first lord of the manor of Morrisania in New York. ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


A prominent land owner in colonial New York, Lewis was appointed as a judge of the Admiralty Court for the province in 1760. As the Revolution drew near, he resigned this post in 1774. He was elected to the Colonial Assembly in 1769. When active revolution began, he was a member of New York's Convention (revolutionary government) from 1775 until 1777. That body, in turn, sent Morris to the Continental Congress for those same years. In Congress, he was an active supporter of independence, and signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. When warned by his brother of the consequences that would follow his signing of the rebellious document, Morris stated, "Damn the consequences. Give me the pen." The Province of New York (Dutch: Provincie Nieuw-Nederland or Provincie New York) was a British colony that existed roughly where the State of New York does now. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The American Revolution was a revolution that ended two centuries of rule of the Thirteen Colonies by the British Empire and created the modern United States of America. ... 1774 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the year 1776. ...


Lewis returned to New York in 1777, serving the new state government in its Senate from 1778 to 1781 and again from 1783 to 1790. His younger half-brother Gouverneur Morris was named to his seat in the Congress. When the New York convention met to ratify the U.S. Constitution in 1788 he was one of the delegates. 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 8, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Morris had to rebuild the family estate after the Revolution, since it had been looted and burned by the British when they occupied New York. Always active in the community, he was a member of the first board to regents for New York University and served from 1784 until 1798. He died on the estate, and is buried in the family vault beneath St. Anne's Episcopal Church in the Bronx. Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Netherlands, Spain, Native Americans Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, Native Americans Commanders George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Nathanael Greene William Howe Henry Clinton Charles Cornwallis The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was the military component of the American... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ...


Great-Grandfather of Confederate Officer Charles Manigault Morris For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... Any holder of an office or of a post may bear the title officer. ... First Lieutenant Charles Manigault Morris, CSN Charles Manigault Morris (7 May 1820 – 22 March 1895) was an officer in the United States Navy and later in the Confederate States Navy. ...


External link

  • biographic sketch at U.S. Congress website


  Results from FactBites:
 
Governor Lewis Morris (1342 words)
Lewis Morris (October 15, 1671 - May 21, 1746), chief justice of New York and governor of New Jersey, was the first lord of the manor of Morrisania in New York.
Morris was elected to the assembly from the town of Eastchester, and joined James Alexander and William Smith in championing the popular cause against the "court party" led by Cosby and De Lancey.
For many years Lewis Morris was an active churchman, serving from 1697 to 1700 as a vestryman of Trinity Church and encouraging the Society for the Propogation of the Gospel in its missionary enterprises.
Lewis Morris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (416 words)
Lewis Morris (April 8, 1726– January 22, 1798) was an American landowner and developer from Morrisania, New York.
A prominent land owner in colonial New York, Lewis was appointed as a judge of the Admiralty Court for the province in 1760.
Lewis returned to New York in 1777, serving the new state government in its Senate from 1778 to 1781 and again from 1783 to 1790.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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