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Encyclopedia > Lewis Cass
Lewis Cass
Lewis Cass

In office
August 1, 1831 – October 5, 1836
Preceded by John Henry Eaton
Succeeded by Joel Roberts Poinsett

In office
March 6, 1857 – December 14, 1860
Preceded by William L. Marcy
Succeeded by Jeremiah S. Black

Born October 9, 1782
Exeter, New Hampshire, USA
Died June 17, 1866
Detroit, Michigan, USA
Political party Democratic
Spouse Eliza Spencer Cass
Profession Lawyer, Politician

Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. He was the nominee of the Democratic Party for President of the United States in 1848. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1001x793, 217 KB)Screenshot: Castle Age - Browser Game Sascha Wirth File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... October 2, Charles Darwin returns from his voyage around the world. ... John Henry Eaton (June 18, 1790–November 17, 1856) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... Joel Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) Official Department of Defense portrait, artist unknown. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... William Learned Marcy ( December 12, 1786– July 4, 1857) was an American statesman. ... Jeremiah Sullivan Black (January 10, 1810–August 19, 1883) was an American statesman and lawyer. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638 Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - City 51. ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Location in Wayne County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick Area    - City 370. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, where he attended Phillips Exeter Academy. Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638 Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - City 51. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (also called Exeter, Phillips Exeter, or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9-12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ...


During the War of 1812, he served as brigadier general fighting at the battle of the Thames. As a reward for his service in the war, he was appointed Governor of the Michigan Territory by President James Madison on October 29, 1813, and served until 1831. He was frequently absent, and several territorial secretaries often served as acting governor in his place. Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels: 14 •Indigenous... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also... A governor or governour (archaic) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the Head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered... From 1805-1818, the western border was a line through Lake Michigan. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1820, he led an expedition to the northern part of the territory, in the northern Great Lakes region in present-day northern Minnesota, in order to map the region and discover the source of the Mississippi River. The source of the river had been unknown until then, resulting in an undefined border between the United States and Britain. The expedition erroneously identified Cass Lake as the source of the river. The source of the river was correctly identified in 1832 by Henry Schoolcraft, who had been Cass's expedition geologist, as nearby Lake Itasca. The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... Cass Lake is a glacially-formed lake, approximately 25 sq. ... Henry Schoolcraft Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (March 28, 1793–December 10, 1864) was an American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist, noted for his early studies of Native American cultures, as well as for his discovery in 1832 of the source of the Mississippi River. ... Lake Itasca and Elk Lake Lake Itasca is a small glacial lake, approximately 1. ...

Lewis Cass
Lewis Cass

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (564x812, 56 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (564x812, 56 KB) http://hdl. ...

Political life

On August 1, 1831, he resigned as governor of the Michigan Territory to take the post of Secretary of War under President Andrew Jackson, serving until 1836. Cass was a central figure in formulating and implementing the Indian Removal Act of the Jackson administration. From 1836 to 1842, he was ambassador to France. August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... This article is 45 kilobytes or more in size. ... The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was a law passed by the Twenty-first United States Congress in order to facilitate the relocation of Native American tribes living east of the Mississippi River in the United States to lands further west. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ...


Cass represented Michigan in the United States Senate from 1845 to 1848. He served as chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs in the 30th Congress. In 1848, he resigned from the Senate to run for President. Cass was a leading supporter of the Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, which held that the people who lived in a territory should decide whether or not to permit slavery there. His nomination caused a split in the Democratic party, leading many antislavery Democrats to join the Free Soil Party. He also supported the annexation of Texas. Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... Thirtieth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Popular sovereignty is the doctrine that government is created by and subject to the will of the people, who are the source of all political power. ... Slave redirects here. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


After losing the election to Zachary Taylor, he returned to the Senate, serving from 1849 to 1857. Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ...


From 1857 to 1860, Cass served as Secretary of State under President James Buchanan. He resigned on December 13, 1860, reportedly disgusted by Buchanan's failure to pursue a stronger policy that might have averted the threatened secession of southern states. Seal of the United States Department of State. ... This article is about the President of the United States. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


He died in 1866 and is buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Detroit. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Michigan, is one of Michigans most important historic cemeteries. ...


A statue of Cass is one of the two that was submitted by Michigan to the National Statuary Hall collection in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. It stands in the National Statuary Hall room. (The other statue is of Zachariah Chandler, which is in the Hall of Columns.) National Statuary Hall The National Statuary Hall is an area in the United States Capitol devoted to statues of people and symbols important in American history. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... ... Zachariah T. Chandler (December 10, 1813 – November 1, 1879) was Mayor of Detroit (1851–52), a four-term U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan (1857–75, 1879), and Secretary of the Interior under U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant (1875–77). ...


See also

This is a list of places in the United States named for Lewis Cass: // Counties Cass County, Illinois Cass County, Indiana Cass County, Iowa Cass County, Michigan Cass County, Minnesota Cass County, Missouri Cass County, Nebraska Cass County, North Dakota Cass County, Texas In addition, Bartow County, Georgia was formerly... The battle of Fort Sumter was the first stage in a conflict that had been brewing for decades. ...

External links

Preceded by
William Hull
Territoral Governor of Michigan
18131831
Succeeded by
George Bryan Porter
Preceded by
John Henry Eaton
United States Secretary of War
August 1, 1831October 5, 1836
Succeeded by
Joel Roberts Poinsett
Preceded by
Edward Livingston
United States Ambassador to France
October 4, 1836November 12, 1842
Succeeded by
William R. King
Preceded by
Augustus S. Porter
United States Senator (Class 1) from Michigan
March 4, 1845May 29, 1848
Served alongside: William Woodbridge and Alpheus Felch
Succeeded by
Thomas Fitzgerald
Preceded by
James K. Polk
Democratic Party presidential candidate
1848 (lost)
Succeeded by
Franklin Pierce
Preceded by
Thomas Fitzgerald
United States Senator (Class 1) from Michigan
January 20, 1849March 3, 1857
Served alongside: Alpheus Felch and Charles E. Stuart
Succeeded by
Zachariah Chandler
Preceded by
David Rice Atchison
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
December 4, 1854
Succeeded by
Jesse D. Bright
Preceded by
William L. Marcy
United States Secretary of State
March 6, 1857December 14, 1860
Succeeded by
Jeremiah S. Black

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lewis Cass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (489 words)
Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician.
Cass was a leading supporter of the Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, which held that the people who lived in a territory should decide whether or not to permit slavery there.
A statue of Cass is one of the two that was submitted by the State of Michigan to The National Statuary Hall Collection in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
Lewis Cass - encyclopedia article about Lewis Cass. (1942 words)
Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician.
A statue of Cass is one of the two that was submitted by the State of Michigan to The National Statuary Hall Collection in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. It resides in the National Statuary Hall room.
Cass Lake is a glacially-formed lake, approximately 25 sq.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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