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Encyclopedia > Levin College of Law
University of Florida Levin College of Law
Established 1909
School type Public
President Dean Robert Jerry
Location Gainesville, Florida, USA
Enrollment 1,153 (approx.)
Faculty 128 (approx.)
USNWR ranking Tier 1
Bar pass rate 81% (Jul 04), 77% (Feb 05)
Annual tuition $7786 (Florida resident), $27,419 (Non-resident)
Homepage www.law.ufl.edu

The Fredric G. Levin College of Law is the law school of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location of Gainesville, Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Alachua Incorporated (city) 15 April 1869 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Pegeen Hanrahan  - City Manager Russ Blackburn Area [1]  - City  49. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The University of Florida (commonly referred to as Florida or UF) is a public land-grant, space-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Location of Gainesville, Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Alachua Incorporated (city) 15 April 1869 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Pegeen Hanrahan  - City Manager Russ Blackburn Area [1]  - City  49. ...

Contents

History

History of Law School

The College of Law was founded in 1909 and was originally housed in Thomas Hall and Bryan Hall. The college became desegregated on September 15, 1958, and its faculty became desegregated shortly thereafter. In 1969 it moved to its current location in Holland Hall on the northwest section of the UF campus. In 1984, a second building, Bruton-Geer Hall was added to the law school. Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ...


The College of Law was renamed the Levin College of Law in 1999 after prominent Pensacola trial lawyer and UF law school alumni (class of 1961) Fredric G. Levin donated $10 million to the school–a sum that was matched by $10 million from the state of Florida, creating a $20 million endowment. (Levin was also noted for bringing a class-action lawsuit against the tobacco industry in the 1990s). Nickname: Location of Pensacola, Florida (top left) Coordinates: Country United States State Florida County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg Area  - City 39. ... For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... Fredric G. Levin (born March 29, 1937) is an American plaintiffs attorney in the state of Florida. ... Endowment may refer to many things: Finance Financial endowment; relating to funds or property donated to institutions or individuals. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... The tobacco industry comprises those persons and companies engaged in the growth, preparation for sale, shipment, advertisement, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. ...


The law school underwent a major renovation between 2004 and 2005, creating new academic space and greatly expanding the law library, which is dedicated as the "Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center", named after Lawton Chiles, former Florida Governor and US Senator who graduated from the law school in 1955 and was employed by the law library during his time at the college. The Legal Information Center is one of the three largest law libraries in the southeast. Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ... Lawton Chiles in an official picture taken during his first term as governor of Florida. ...


Dedication of New Facilities

On September 9, 2005, Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor spoke at the dedication of the renovated facilities. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ...


In September 2006, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited the College of Law to speak and to dedicate a classroom in honor of her friend and UF Law alumni Chesterfield Smith. Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ...


Future Plans

Construction is scheduled to begin on a new courtroom facility in May 2007, with expected opening in fall 2008. The facility, which was made possible by an additional $5 million donation from the Levin family, will be two stories tall and include a fully functional trial and appellate court. The new courtroom is designed to incorporate new technology to allow students to understand the role of technology in modern practice. A courtroom is the actual enclosed space in which a judge regularly holds court. ... A trial court or court of first instance is the court in which most civil or criminal cases begin. ... In law, an appeal is a process for making a formal challenge to an official decision. ...


Academics

The College of Law offers a three-year, full-time program leading to a Juris Doctor degree. It also has several graduate law programs, including an LL.M-SJD degree program in tax law and LL.M. programs in international taxation, and comparative law. Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... Legum Doctor (English: Doctor of Laws; abbreviated to LL.D.) In the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the LL.D. is a higher doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications, containing significant and original contributions to the science or study of law. ...


JD Program

In 2008, U.S. News and World Report ranked the law school's JD program as #47 in the United States. The College of Law's ranking dropped from #41 in 2007. The Dean of the law school characterized the drop as predictable, temporary, and due to a statistical computation based on figures that do not accurately reflect the size of the student body [1].


The College offers admission in the fall semester (spring admissions were discontinued in 2006). Its entering class has a median GPA of a 3.6 and median LSAT score of a 159 (in 2005 it was 161). It admits 26.4 percent of applicants. [2]. Admissions are granted for the fall semester only - spring admissions have been abolished. In the United States, grading is done with several different systems. ... The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an examination administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), intended to provide law schools in the United States and Canada with (to quote LSAC) a standard measure of acquired reading and verbal reasoning skills that law schools can use as one of...


Required first-year courses are Torts, Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law, Contracts, Legal Research and Writing, Constitutional Law, Civil Procedure, Property, and Appellate Advocacy. Students are also required to take Legal Drafting prior to graduation. It is recommended, though not required, that students also take Evidence, Estates and Trusts, Corporations, and Trial Practice. Tort is a legal term that means a civil wrong, as opposed to a criminal wrong, that is recognized by law as grounds for a lawsuit. ... Legal ethics refers to an ethical code governing those in the practice of law. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Legal writing is a type of technical writing used in the field of law by legislators, lawyers, judges, legislative drafters, law-textbook authors, and others in the legal field to express legal analysis and legal rights and duties. ... In the United States, constitutional law generally refers to the provisions of the United States Constitution, as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In law, an appeal is a process for making a formal challenge to an official decision. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... The law of trusts and estates is generally considered the body of law which governs the management of personal affairs and the disposition of property of an individual in anticipation and the event of such persons incapacity or death, also known as the law of successions in civil law. ... Corporations law or corporate law is the law concerning the creation and regulation of corporations. ... Trial practice is an upper level course offered in most law schools designed to teach future litigators the fine points of presenting a case to a judge and jury. ...


Students can choose to pursue their J.D. in conjunction with another graduate degree, including a master's degree, Ph.D, or M.D. in one of the university's 33 joint-degree programs. Students can also complete specific requirements in addition to those required for the JD and receive a certificate showing specialization in estate planning and trusts, family law, intellectual property law, environmental and Land Use Law, or International and Comparative Law. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... Estate planning is the process of accumulating and disposing of an estate to maximize the goals of the estate owner. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... Family Law was a television drama starring Kathleen Quinlan as a divorced lawyer who attempted to start her own law firm after her lawyer husband took all their old clients. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... Environmental law is a body of law, which is a system of complex and interlocking statutes, common law, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seeks to protect the natural environment which may be affected, impacted or endangered by human activities. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Graduate Law Programs

In 2006, U.S. News and World Report ranked the law school's LLM tax program as #2 in the United States. The program offers one-year courses of study leading to the degree of LL.M. in Taxation or LL.M. in International Taxation. Nearly all students in the LL.M. in Taxation program are graduates of American law schools. The LL.M. in International Taxation Program is open to graduates of U.S. and foreign law schools. In a typical year, about 90 students are enrolled in the tax LLM programs. The College of Law also offers a doctoral degree (J.S.D.) in taxation. Nearly all courses in the program are taught by full-time faculty. The College has more full-time tax professors than any other law school in the United States. The faculty includes several of the most distinguished tax law professors in the country. The faculty and students of the graduate tax programs edit and publish the Florida Tax Review. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


The college's comparative law program is offered to graduates of foreign law schools who seek to increase their understanding of the U.S. legal system.


Centers and Institutes

The College of Law is home to a number of institutes including the Center for Governmental Responsibility, the Center for Race and Race Relations, and the Elder Law Center.


Student organizations and co-curricular activities

The College of Law has over 40 active student organizations. There are many groups which focus their activities on a specific area of law, such as criminal law, military law, business law and public interest law. There is a broad array of organizations whose focus is on political and social issues, such as the Law School Democrats, Law School Republicans, the Federalist Society, the Law School Independents, and the National Lawyers Guild. Other organizations, like Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) allow law students to use their legal skills to help the community. Other groups seek to provide an organization for students who share a common background, such as the Black Law Students Association, the Christian Legal Society, Lambda Legal, Law Association for Women, and the Spanish-American Law Students Association. Military law is a distinct legal system to which members of armed forces are subject. ... Commercial law or business law is the body of law which governs business and commerce and is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals both with issues of private law and public law. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... The National Lawyers Guild is a progressive Bar Association in the United States dedicated to the need for basic and progressive change in the structure of our political and economic system. ... Lambda Legal (formerly Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund), formed in 1973, is an American non-governmental organization devoted to promoting the legal rights of gay men and lesbians, bisexuals, the transgendered, and people with HIV or AIDS, through impact litigation, education, and public policy work. ...


The college has three moot court teams: the Justice Campbell Thornal Moot Court Team, which competes in state, national, and intramural competitions; the International Commercial Arbitration Moot Court Team, which deals with arbitration and competes nationally and internationally; and the Jessup Moot Court Team, which deals with international law. Moot court is an extracurricular activity at many law schools in which participants take part in simulated court proceedings, usually to include drafting briefs and participating in oral argument. ... Arbitration is a legal technique for the resolution of disputes outside the courts, wherein the parties to a dispute refer it to one or more persons (the arbitrators or arbitral tribunal), by whose decision (the award) they agree to be bound. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


The College of Law has a trial team, which competes nationally.


The College of Law publishes five law reviews: the Florida Law Review, the Florida Journal of International Law, the University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy, the Journal of Technology Law and Policy, and the Entertainment Law Review. A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ...


The John Marshall Bar Association or JMBA (pronounced Jum-Buh) is the student bar association at the college. Membership is optional.


Aesthetics

The architectural style of Bruton-Geer Hall, completed in 1984, is best classified as brutalism, as concrete features prominently in its design. The renovation of Holland Hall was completed in 2005 at the cost of $25 million and features brick and concrete. Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Concrete being poured, raked and vibrated into place in residential construction in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Major donors & various others to the law school have classrooms and library study rooms named in their honor with plaques outside the doors of these classrooms bearing their names.


The grounds of the College of Law contain several pieces of artwork. The newest additions, added in 2005, were two metal sculptures created by Jim Cole from the Rhode Island School of DesignThe Legislative and The Executive. The third installment, The Judiciary, arrived in 2006. These sculptures also function as benches. The lobby of the law school library contains a sculpture made by Mr. Cole in the form of a chair - it is called "The Lobbyist." Also contained on the grounds of the college are a series of large, intertwined metal rings, which have the appearance of being partially underground. They are known as "the Cheerios." The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced /RIZ-dee/) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ... A box of Honey Nut Cheerios breakfast cereal brand. ...


Prominent Alumni

Attorneys

  • Fred Levin (prominent plaintiff's lawyer well known for tobacco litigation, namesake of the law school)

Fredric G. Levin (born March 29, 1937) is an American plaintiffs attorney in the state of Florida. ...

Politicians

Charles Edward Bennett (December 2, 1910 - September 6, 2003) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Florida from 1949 to 1993. ... Richard W. Ervin, Jr. ... Spessard Lindsey Holland (July 10, 1892–November 6, 1971) was an American politician. ... Lawton Chiles in an official picture taken during his first term as governor of Florida. ... Kenneth Hood Buddy MacKay, Jr. ... Reubin ODonovan Askew, portrayed in his official gubernatorial portrait. ... William Courtland Lantaff—also known as Bill Lantaff— (born in Buffalo, Erie County, New York, July 31, 1913 and died in Miami, Florida January 28, 1970) was a Democrat politician from Florida. ... Charles Joseph Joe Scarborough (born April 9, 1963) is the host of the programs Morning Joe and Scarborough Country on MSNBC and served in the United States House of Representatives, from 1995 to 2001, as a Republican from Florida. ...

Judges

  • S. Jay Plager (United States Circuit Judge for the Federal Circuit)
  • Susan Black (United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit)
  • Rosemary Barkett (United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit)
  • Peter T. Fay (United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit)
  • Stephen Mickle (United States District Judge, Northern District of Florida)
  • Maurice Paul (United States District Judge, Northern District of Florida)
  • John Richard Smoak, Jr. (United States District Judge, Northern District of Florida)
  • William Terrell Hodges (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Anne Conway (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Ralph Wilson Nimmons, Jr. (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Steven Douglas Merryday (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Patricia C. Fawsett (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • James S. Moody, Jr. (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Howell W. Melton (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • Ben Krentzman (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • George C. Young (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • William J. Castagna (United States District Judge, Middle District of Florida)
  • James Lawrence King (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • C. Clyde Atkins (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • Edward B. Davis (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • Ursula Mancusi Ungaro-Benages (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • Jose A. Gonzalez, Jr. (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • Sidney M. Aronovitz (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • James W. Kehoe (United States District Judge, Southern District of Florida)
  • Seventeen graduates have served on the Florida Supreme Court, 15 of them as Chief Justice

S. Jay Plager was a Judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. ... Judge Barkett is a Federal Appeals Court Judge on the 11th Circuit of the United States. ... John Richard Smoak, Jr. ... Anne Conway, Viscountess Conway and Killultagh (14 December 1631–1679) was an English philosopher whose work, in the tradition of the Cambridge Platonists, was an influence on Leibniz. ... Steven D. Merryday (born 1950, Palatka, Florida) is a United States District Judge for the Middle District of Florida. ... James S. Moody, Jr. ... Ben Krentzman was a former U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of Florida. ... James Lawrence King (born on December 20, 1927 in Miami, Florida) is the senior federal judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida, and one of the longest serving federal judges in the entire United States. ... Carl Clyde Atkins (November 23, 1914-March 11, 1999) was a judge in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. ... Ursula Mancusi Ungaro-Benages is a U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida. ... Sidney M. Aronovitz was a U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida. ... The Florida Supreme Court is the highest court in the State of Florida. ...

Bar Association Presidents

  • In the past 40 years, four presidents of the American Bar Association were graduates of the college, more than any other law school for that time period.
  • Since 1950, some 60 percent of Florida Bar Association presidents were graduates of the college.

American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... The Florida Bar is the third largest mandatory state bar in the United States. ...

External links

  • Law school home page
  • FlaLaw, the Law School's Weekly Newsletter
  • Phi Alpha Delta
  • UF Trial Team
  • Video of Justice Ginsberg dedicated Ceremonial Classroom at the law school

 
 

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