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Encyclopedia > Leukocytosis
Leukocytosis
ICD-10 code:
ICD-9 code: 288.3, 288.8


Leukocytosis is an elevation of the white blood cell count (the leukocyte count) above the normal range. The normal adult human leukocyte count in peripheral blood is 4.4-10.8 x 109/L. A white blood count of 11.0 or more suggests leukocytosis. The following codes are used with International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... White Blood Cells is also the name of a White Stripes album. ... Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are present in the blood and help carry oxygen to the rest of the cells in the body Blood is a circulating tissue composed of fluid plasma and cells (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets). ... The litre (spelled liter in American English) is a unit of volume. ...


Leukocytosis is very common in acutely ill patients. It occurs in response to a wide variety of conditions, including viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infection, cancer, and exposure to certain medications or chemicals. Leukocytosis can also be the first indication of neoplastic growth of leukocytes.


A leukocyte count above 25 to 30 x 109/L is termed a leukemoid reaction, which is the reaction of a healthy bone marrow to extreme stress, trauma, or infection. (It is different from leukemia and from leukoerythroblastosis, in which immature blood cells are present in peripheral blood.) The litre (spelled liter in American English) is a unit of volume. ... The term leukemoid reaction describes an elevated white blood cell count, or leukocytosis, that is a physiologic response to stress or infection (as opposed to a primary blood malignancy, such as leukemia). ... Leukemia (leukaemia in Commonwealth English) is a group of blood diseases characterized by malignancies (cancer) of the blood-forming tissues. ...


The mechanism that causes leukocytosis can be of several forms: an increased release of leukocytes from bone marrow storage pools, decreased margination of leukocytes onto vessel walls, decreased extravasation of leukocytes from the vessels into tissues, or an increase in number of precursor cells in the marrow. Bone marrow is the tissue comprising the center of large bones. ...


Leukocytosis can be subcategorized by the type of white blood cell that is increased in number. Leukocytosis in which neutrophil count is elevated is neutrophilia; leukocytosis in which lymphocyte count is elevated is lymphocytosis; leukocytosis in which monocyte count is elevated is monocytosis; and leukocytosis in which eosinophil count is elevated is eosinophilia. Neutrophil granulocytes (commonly referred to as neutrophils) are a class of white blood cells and are part of the immune system. ... Neutrophilia (or neutrophil leukocytosis) is a condition where a person has a high number of neutrophil granulocytes in their blood. ... A lymphocyte is a type of white blood cell involved in the human bodys immune system. ... A lymphocytosis is an increase in the number of lymphocytes in the blood. ... A monocyte is a leukocyte, part of the human bodys immune system that protect agains blood-borne pathogens and move quickly to sites of infection in the tissues. ... Monocytosis is an increase in the number of circulating monocytes. ... Eosinophils are white blood cells that are responsible for combating infection by parasites in the body. ... Eosinophilia is the state of having high eosinophil granulocytes in the blood. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
eMedicine - Leukocytosis : Article by Susumu Inoue, MD (2352 words)
From a practical point of view, leukocytosis traditionally is classified according to the component of white cells that is contributing to an increase in the total number of WBCs.
Therefore, leukocytosis may be caused by an increase in (1) neutrophil count (ie, neutrophilia), (2) lymphocyte count (ie, lymphocytosis), (3) monocyte count (ie, monocytosis), (4) eosinophilic granulocyte count (ie, eosinophilia), (5) basophilic granulocyte count (ie, basophilia), or (6) immature cells (eg, blasts).
Leukocytosis can be caused by infection, inflammation, allergic reaction, malignancy, hereditary disorders, or other miscellaneous causes.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Leukocytosis (336 words)
Leukocytosis is an elevation of the white blood cell count (the leukocyte count) above the normal range.
The mechanism that causes leukocytosis can be of several forms: an increased release of leukocytes from bone marrow storage pools, decreased margination of leukocytes onto vessel walls, decreased extravasation of leukocytes from the vessels into tissues, or an increase in number of precursor cells in the marrow.
Leukocytosis in which neutrophil count is elevated is neutrophilia; leukocytosis in which lymphocyte count is elevated is lymphocytosis; leukocytosis in which monocyte count is elevated is monocytosis; and leukocytosis in which eosinophil count is elevated is eosinophilia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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