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Encyclopedia > Letterbox
A 2.39:1 widescreen image letterboxed in a 1.33:1 screen.
A 2.39:1 widescreen image letterboxed in a 1.33:1 screen.

Letterboxing is the practice of transferring widescreen film to video formats while preserving the film's original aspect ratio. Since the video display often has a square aspect ratio, the resulting videographic image has mattes (black bars) above and below it; LTBX is the identifying acronym for films and images so formatted. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Letterboxing is an outdoor hobby that combines elements of orienteering, art and problem-solving. ... Download high resolution version (1280x958, 328 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x958, 328 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Aspect ratio. ... Mattes are used in photography and filmmaking to insert part of a foreground image onto a background image, which is often a matte painting, a background filmed by the second unit, or computer generated imagery. ...


Letterboxing is the alternative to the full-screen, pan-and-scan transference of a widescreen film image to videotape or videodisc. In pan-and-scan transfers, the original image is cropped to the 1.33:1 (4:3) aspect ratio of the standard television screen, whereas letterboxing preserves the film's original image composition seen in the cinema. A 2. ...


Letterboxing was for use in 4:3 television displays when widescreen television was in its technologic infancy. Any Academy ratio (1.33:1) film will appear stretched and distorted to fill the widescreen television display, avoided by pillar boxing the image either via the TV set or the DVD player. Occasionally, an image broadcast at 4:3 appears letterboxed on a 4:3 or a 16:9 or wider aspect ratio television screen. This effect is common on personal video websites and old documentaries, either the original image's top and bottom have been matted or it appears stretched and wider than normal, making the people appear fat. A 4:3 image pillarboxed into a 16:9 display The pillar box effect occurs in widescreen video displays when black bars (mattes or masking) are placed on the sides of the image. ...

Contents

Letterboxing in the cinema and home video

Some cineàstes prefer letterbox video formatting of their films; Woody Allen insisted that Manhattan be released letterboxed; Sydney Pollack preferred the widescreen in a bonus segment of The Interpreter DVD, despite there being pan-and-scan and letterbox versions; Miloš Forman thinks the matting distracts the viewer. Nonetheless, most video releases of movies are made without consulting either the director or the cinematographer. Often, videocassettes contained only pan-and-scan versions, but DVD versions tend to offer both versions. Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Manhattan is a 1979 romantic comedy film. ... Sydney Pollack (born July 1, 1934 in Lafayette, Indiana) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... The Interpreter is a 2005 drama/thriller film, directed by Sydney Pollack and starring Nicole Kidman, Sean Penn, and Catherine Keener. ... Jan Tomáš Forman (born February 18, 1932), better known as MiloÅ¡ Forman, is a film director, actor, screenwriter and professor. ...


Letterboxing on television

Current digital high-definition television (HDTV) systems use video displays with a wider aspect ratio than standard television sets, making it easier to accurately transfer widescreen films. In addition to cinema films, some contemporary television programming is produced in widescreen and high definition; and, when viewed with a standard 4:3 TV set, it appears letterboxed. Programs broadcast in HDTV are sometimes letterboxed in standard-definition television (SDTV) sets. Digital video is a type of video recording system that works by using a digital, rather than analog, of the video signal. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ...


In Europe, letterboxing has been the display standard for widescreen cinema on television, because the higher-resolution PAL television system does not degrade letterboxed images as much as the American NTSC system. Together with digital broadcasting allowing 1.78:1 (16:9) widescreen format transmissions without losing resolution, 1.78:1 widescreen television is becoming the European television norm for television materials. Although this is not true of high-definition television, it has the same aspect ratio. Most programming in countries such as Britain and France is in analogue letterbox format (adopted in the 1990s); in Germany, most television programming is in the full-screen, 1.33:1 aspect ratio. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ...


On a widescreen television set, a 1.78:1 image fills the screen, however, 2.39:1 aspect ration films are letterboxed with narrow mattes. Since the 1.85:1 aspect ratio does not match the 1.78:1 (16:9) aspect ratio of widescreen DVDs and high-definition video, slight letterboxing occurs; the mattes are so narrow as to be unnoticeable. Usually, such matting of 1:85:1 film is eliminated to match the the 1.78:1 aspect ration in the DVD and HD image transferrence.


Most current camcorder models have a widescreen recording mode that appears letterboxed on a 4:3 TV set. Sony DV Handycam A camcorder is a portable electronic device for recording video images and audio onto an internal storage device. ...


Pillarboxing and windowboxing

Pillarboxing (reversed letterboxing) is the display of an image within a wider image frame wider by adding lateral mattes, e.g. 1.33:1 and 1.85:1 have lateral mattes when displayed on 2.40:1 aspect ratio television screen. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A 4:3 image pillarboxed into a 16:9 display The pillar box effect occurs in widescreen video displays when black bars (mattes or masking) are placed on the sides of the image. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A windowboxed image (16:9 to 4:3 to 16:9) Windowboxing is when the aspect ratio of a film is such that the letterbox effect and pillarbox effect occur simultaneously[1][2][3]. Sometimes, by accident or design, a standard ratio image is presented in the central portion of...


Windowboxing occurs when a 1.33:1 (4:3) image appears centred in a television screen.[1][2] It is also called "matchbox", "gutterbox", and "postage stamp" display.[3]. It is a wasteful format that reduces the image's resolution.[4]. This occurs in DVD editions of Star Trek films whenever the included widescreen documentaries show original television series footage. It is seen in The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course, a film displaying widescreen pillarboxing (windowboxing) with 1.85:1 scenes in a 2.40:1 frame. The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... A windowboxed image (16:9 to 4:3 to 16:9) Windowboxing is when the aspect ratio of a film is such that the letterbox effect and pillarbox effect occur simultaneously[1][2][3]. Sometimes, by accident or design, a standard ratio image is presented in the central portion of...


An alternative is "tilt-and-scan", horizontally matting the original 1.33:1 television images to the 1.78:1 aspect ratio. This was a characteristic of video from the Fisher-Price PXL-2000 camcorder of the late 1980s. Moreover, some 1980s 8-bit home computers feature gutterboxing display mode. In particular, the Commodore 64, VIC-20, and Commodore 128 (in 40-column mode) featured coloured gutterboxing of the main text window, while the Atari 8-bit family featured a blue text window with a black border. Occasionally, an image is deliberately windowboxed for stylistic effect, e.g. the documentary-style sequence of Rent suggesting an older-format camera representing the 4:3 aspect ratio. Fisher-Price is a well-known brand of toys, with headquarters located in historic East Aurora, New York. ... The Fisher-Price PXL-2000 (also known as the PixelVision by Fisher-Price, and the KiddieCorder by some of its fans) was a toy black-and-white camcorder produced in 1987 that used an ordinary compact audio cassette as its recording medium. ... C-64 redirects here. ... VIC-20 with accessories. ... The Commodore 128 (C128, CBM 128, C=128) home/personal computer was Commodore Business Machiness (CBM) last commercially released 8-bit machine. ... An Atari 800XL, one of the most popular machines in the series. ... Rent is a 2005 film adaptation of the Broadway musical of the same name. ...


See also

In television technology, Active Format Descriptor or Active Format Description (AFD) is a signal that broadcasters will transmit with the picture to enable 4:3 and 16:9 television sets to display picture in the intended aspect ratio. ... This is a list of film formats known to have been developed for shooting or viewing motion pictures since the development of such photographic technology towards the end of the 19th century. ... The film industry is built upon a large number of technologies and techniques. ... A 2. ... The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.jeremymoore.com/AdobePremiere/PAR_Displays/
  2. ^ http://www.acmehowto.com/howto/hometheater/glossary/glossaryw.php
  3. ^ http://broadband.motorola.com/consumers/hdtv/glossary.asp
  4. ^ http://rtfm-nub.blogspot.com/2007/08/thoughts-on-some-hbo-hd-broadcasts-810i.html

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Letterbox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (690 words)
Letterboxing is the practice of transferring widescreen films to video formats while preserving the original aspect ratio.
Letterboxing takes its name from the similarity of the resulting image to a horizontal opening in a postal letter box.
Woody Allen, for instance, insisted on a letterboxed release of Manhattan.
Mark Sheehan's Letterbox Page (394 words)
Letterboxing is an interesting phenomenon that appears to have begun in 1854 at Cranmere Pool on Dartmoor, a vast boggy area of SW England that is now a National Park.
Letterbox finding is done by individuals and small groups, initally as an interesting personal challenge, then as an obsession.
 magazine, letterboxers don't socialize much with one another, at least not on the moor, though apparently there are groups that meet off the moor to compare notes in various ways.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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