FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Lesson" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lesson

A lesson is a structured period of time where learning is intended to occur. It involves one or more students (also called pupils or learners in some circumstances) being taught by a teacher or instructor. A lesson may be either one section of a textbook (which, apart from the printed page, can also include multimedia) or, more frequently, a short period of time during which learners are taught about a particular subject or taught how to perform a particular activity. Lessons are generally taught in a classroom but may instead take place in a situated learning environment. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Students attending a lecture at the Helsinki University of Technology The word student is etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, meaning to direct ones zeal at; hence a student is one who directs zeal at a subject. ... A teachers room in a Japanese middle school, 2005. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A university classroom with permanently-installed desk-chairs and green chalkboards. ... Situated learning is education that takes place in a setting functionally identical to that where the learning will be applied: Workshops, kitchens, greenhouses and gardens used as classrooms Stand-up role playing in the real world setting, including most military training Field trips including archaeological digs and participant-observer studies...


In a wider sense, a lesson is an insight gained by a learner into a previously unfamiliar subject-matter. Such a lesson can be either planned or accidental, enjoyable or painful. The colloquial phrase "to teach someone a lesson", means to punish or scold a person for a mistake they have made in order to ensure that they do not make the same mistake again.


Lessons can also be made entertaining. When the term education is combined with entertainment, the term edutainment is coined. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Recreation. ... Edutainment (also educational entertainment or entertainment-education) is a form of entertainment designed to educate as well as to amuse. ...

Contents

Types of lesson

There are many different formats and structures of lessons:

  • One teacher/instructor with many students
  • Private tuition (one-on-one teaching)
  • No teacher presence, perhaps a formal learning time with use of textbooks or multimedia

Pre-recorded tapes have been a popular method of learning, particularly for foreign languages and modern techniques such as video conferencing have allowed teaching to be undertaken without the students or teachers being in the same room. Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Groupware | Telecommunications stubs ...


Lesson plan

Main article: lesson plan

Teachers and instructors usually have a lesson plan which dictates the structure of the teaching. A group of lessons may be linked together in a unit plan or scheme or work. The detail of the plan may vary with some being a simple list of what is going to be taught in a lesson with others working including much more detail, such as a time plan and the learning aims and objectives. Student teachers and beginning teachers are usually advised to put a great amount of detail into the written plan. This ensures that the plan will be cohesive, that all the components of a successful lesson are taken care of, and that one has a checklist to ensure that practicalities are taken care of (e.g, resources, scheduling, and classroom management considerations). Furthermore, beginning teachers are often advised to script some sections for themselves, such as questions they might ask the students in order to get a discussion going at the beginning of the lesson. The expectation is that the teachers can and should depart from the script when appropriate; improvisation is definitely encouraged and the fact of having written it out in advance ensures that an adequate amount of thought has been put into it ahead of time. Another reason for including a great amount of detail is that student teachers are often required to submit lesson plans in advance to their mentor teachers or professors in order to receive feedback on their ideas. When creating the lesson plan it is usual to look at the following: A lesson plan is a teachers detailed description of the course of instruction for an individual lesson. ... A lesson plan is a teachers detailed description of the course of instruction for an individual lesson. ... Classroom management is a term used by many teachers to describe the process of ensuring that classroom lessons run smoothly despite disruptive behaviour by students. ...

  • The aims (the broader goals of the lesson, what it is reaching towards)
  • The objectives (the specific, measurable outcomes of the lesson - the particular skills or knowledge students should have acquired by its conclusion)
  • The number of attendees and the student-teacher ratio
  • The previous knowledge of the learners (which may or may not be the same for all) and how this will be activated at the start of the lesson
  • The motivation of the learners (school students, for example, have no choice but to attend so the teacher must build some kind of motivation into the lesson)
  • The time required for each section of teaching and learning
  • The resources required and available
  • Catering for the different needs (cultural differences, learning styles, special needs) of the individuals
  • How the lesson is to be evaluated.

Etymology

The word lesson comes from Latin lectio "the action of reading (out)". From there, the word was also used for the text itself, very often a passage from the Bible read out during a religious service ("first lesson", "second lesson"). Finally, any portion of a book to be studied was referred to as a lesson. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ...


See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... While many individuals are content to play a musical instrument by ear or by practicing individual pieces until a reasonable proficiency is achieved, others wish to develop mastery of one or more instruments, and commonly seek formal instruction in the form of music lessons. ...

External links

  • Mississippi Teacher Corps Lesson Plans
  • Current Events in Education: A Living Textbook - Lots of Lesson Ideas

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lesson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (695 words)
A lesson may be either one section of a textbook (which, apart from the printed page, can also include multimedia) or, more frequently, a short period of time during which learners are taught about a particular subject or taught how to perform a particular activity.
Lessons are generally taught in a classroom but may instead take place in a situated learning environment.
This ensures that the plan will be cohesive, that all the components of a successful lesson are taken care of, and that one has a checklist to ensure that practicalities are taken care of (e.g, resources, scheduling, and classroom management considerations).
ReadWriteThink - All Lessons (10981 words)
In this lesson, students become engaged in the studies of both art and written language, as they create descriptive writing pieces in which adjectives are used to describe the artistic elements present within a work.
In this lesson, students create poetry collections with a back-to-school theme of “getting to know each other.” Students write poetry with the goal of introducing themselves, helping to create a sense of classroom community, while exploring the many and varied types and forms of poetry and constructing and refining their own definitions of poetry.
This lesson asks students to examine three examples of revisionist fairy tales—a book, a graphic novel, and a poem—in which female characters act in empowered roles rather than behaving helpless and submissive, which is often the case in traditional folk or fairy tales.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m