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Encyclopedia > Leslie Stephen

Sir Leslie Stephen (November 28, 1832February 22, 1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) was a British author and feminist, who is considered to be one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ... Vanessa Bell (May, 1879 - April 7, 1961), was an English painter and interior designer and a member of the Bloomsbury group. ...


Stephen was born at Kensington Gore in London, the brother of James Fitzjames Stephen and grandson of James Stephen. His family belonged to the Clapham Sect, a Christian group. At his father's house he saw a good deal of the Macaulays, James Spedding, Sir Henry Taylor and Nassau Senior. After studying at Eton College and Trinity Hall, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. (20th wrangler) in 1854 and M.A. in 1857, Stephen remained for several years a fellow and tutor of his college. He recounted some of his experiences in a chapter in his Life of Fawcett as well as in some less formal Sketches from Cambridge: By a Don (1865). These sketches were reprinted from the Pall Mall Gazette, to the proprietor of which, George Smith, he had been introduced by his brother. It was at Smith's house at Hampstead that Stephen met his first wife, Harriet Marion (1840 - 1875), daughter of William Makepeace Thackeray, with whom he had a daughter, Laura Makepeace Stephen (1870 - 1945); after her death he married Julia Prinsep Jackson (1846 - 1895), widow of Herbert Duckworth. Kensington Gore is a street in central London, the same name having been formerly used for the piece of land on which it stands. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,500,000 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ... Sir James Fitzjames Stephen (March 3, 1829 - 1894) was an English lawyer and judge, created 1st Baronet Stephen by Queen Victoria. ... James Stephen (30 June 1758-10 October 1832) was an English lawyer, associated with the abolitionist movement. ... The Clapham Sect was an influential group of like-minded social reformers in England at the beginning of the nineteenth century (active c. ... As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... James Spedding (June 28, 1808 - March 9, 1881) was an English author, chiefly known as the editor of the works of Francis Bacon. ... Sir Henry Taylor (October 18, 1800 - March 27, 1886) was an English dramatist. ... Nassau William Senior (September 26, 1790 - June 4, 1864), English economist, was born at Compton, Berks, the eldest son of the Rev. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys. ... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... hello This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ...


While at Cambridge, Stephen became an Anglican clergyman. In 1865, having renounced his religious beliefs, and after a visit to the United States two years earlier, where he had formed lasting friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton, he settled in London and became a journalist, eventually editing the Cornhill Magazine in 1871 where R.L. Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, W.E. Norris, Henry James and James Payn figured among his contributors. In his spare time, he participated in athletics and mountaineering. He also contributed to the Saturday Review, Fraser, Macmillan, the Fortnightly and other periodicals. He was already known as a climber, as a contributor to Peaks, Passes and Glaciers (1862), and as one of the earliest presidents of the Alpine Club, when in 1871, in commemoration of his own first ascents of the Schreckhorn and Rothhorn, he published his Playground of Europe. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The brothers Charles Benjamin Norton, Frank Henry Norton, and Charles Eliot Norton, between 1853-1855. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,500,000 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850 – December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer. ... Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... William Edward Norris (November 18, 1847- 1925), English novelist, was the son of Sir W Norris, chief justice of Ceylon. ... Photograph of Henry James Henry James, OM (April 15, 1843 - February 28, 1916), son of Henry James Sr. ... Caricature from Punch, 10 December 1881 James Payn (February 28, 1830 - March 25, 1898), English novelist, was born at Cheltenham, his father being clerk to the Thames Commissioners and treasurer to the county of Berkshire. ... Athletics, also known, especially in American English, as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events, which can roughly be divided into running, throwing, and jumping. ... Mountaineering is an umbrella term that can variously be used to describe the actions of climbing, hillwalking and scrambling. ...


During the eleven years of his editorship, in addition to three volumes of critical studies, he made two valuable contributions to philosophical history and theory: The History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century (1876 and 1881) and The Science of Ethics (1882); the second of these was extensively adopted as a textbook on the subject. The first was generally recognized as an important addition to philosophical literature and led immediately to Stephen's election at the Athenaeum Club in 1877. The Hall of the Athenaeum c. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Stephen also served as the first editor (1885 - 1891) of the Dictionary of National Biography. The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ...


Works

1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... Samuel Johnson circa 2002, painted by Irish .]] Dr Samuel Johnson (September 7, 1709 Old Style/September 18 New Style 1–December 13, 1784), often referred to simply as Dr Johnson, was one of Englands most forgetful people: a poet, essayist, biographer, lexicographer, and often did stupid things like flooding... Alexander Pope, an English poet best known for his Essay on Criticism and Rape of the Lock Pope, circa 1727. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish writer who is famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, and A Tale of a Tub. ... George Eliot Mary Ann Evans, better known by the pen name George Eliot (22 November 1819 - 22 December 1880), was an English novelist. ... Thomas Hobbes (April 5, 1588–December 4, 1679) was a noted English political philosopher, most famous for his book Leviathan (1651). ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir Leslie Stephen - LoveToKnow 1911 (1224 words)
Five volumes were then published under the joint editorship of Leslie Stephen and of Mr Sidney Lee, whom he had appointed as his assistant in March 1883.
Many of these are salted with irony, and most of them are characterized by felicitous phrases, by frequent flashes of insight (especially of the sardonic order), and by the good fortune which attends a consummate artist in his special craft.
As a thinker Leslie Stephen showed himself consistently a follower of Hume, Bentham, the Mills and G. Lewes, but he accepted the older utilitarianism only as modified by the application of Darwinian principles, upon lines to some extent indicated by Herbert Spencer (see Ethics).
Leslie Stephen (394 words)
Sir Leslie Stephen (1832-1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell.
Stephen was born at Kensington Gore[?] in London, the brother of James Fitzjames Stephen and grandson of James Stephen.
He was already known as a climber, as a contributor to Peaks, Passes and Glaciers (1862), and as one of the earliest presidents of the Alpine Club, when in 1871, in commemoration of his own first ascents of the Schreckhorn[?] and Rothhorn[?], he published his Playground of Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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