FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Les Baxter

Les Baxter (March 14, 1922 - January 15, 1996) studied piano at the Detroit Conservatory before moving to Los Angeles for further studies at Pepperdine College. Abandoning a concert career as a pianist he turned to popular music as a singer, and at the age of 23 he joined Mel Tormé's Mel-Tones, singing on Artie Shaw records such as "What Is This Thing Called Love". He then turned to arranging and conducting for Capitol Records in 1950 and was responsible for the early Nat King Cole hits, "Mona Lisa" and "Too Young". In 1953 he scored his first movie, the sailing travelogue Tanga Tika. With his own orchestra he released a number of hits including "Ruby" (1953), "Unchained Melody" (1955) and "The Poor People Of Paris" (1956). He also achieved success with concept albums of his own orchestral suites, Le Sacre Du Sauvage, Festival Of The Gnomes, Ports Of Pleasure and Brazil Now, the first three for Capitol and the fourth on Gene Norman's Crescendo label. Also, the "Whistle" theme from the TV show Lassie, was written by him. Baxter had obvious skill in writing Latin music for strings, but he did not restrict his activities to recording. As he once told Soundtrack! magazine, "I never turn anything down". March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ... This article refers to the largest city of Michigan. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ... Mel Tormé (September 13, 1925 - June 5, 1999) was a jazz singer with a light, velvety, high-tenor voice. ... Nat King Cole in The Blue Gardenia (1953) Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a hugely popular American singer and jazz musician. ... Mona Lisa was an Academy Award-winning song written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston for the film . ... Too Young is a popular song. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Unchained Melody is one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, by some counts having spawned over 500 versions. ... 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Poor People of Paris is a popular song. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lassie, a Rough Collie, is the worlds most famous dog and a fictional character who has starred in many movies, TV shows, and books over the years. ...


In the 60s he formed the Balladeers, a besuited and conservative folk group that at one time featured a slim and youthful David Crosby. He operated in radio as musical director of Halls Of Ivy and the Bob Hope and Abbott and Costello shows; he also worked on movie soundtracks and later composed and conducted scores for Roger Corman's Edgar Allan Poe films and other horror stories and teenage musicals, including Comedy Of Terrors, Muscle Beach Party, The Dunwich Horror and Frogs. When soundtrack work reduced in the 80s he scored music for theme parks and seaworlds. In the 90s Baxter was widely celebrated, alongside Martin Denny (for whom he had written "Quiet Village") and Arthur Lyman Group, as one of the progenitors of what had become known as the "exotica" movement. In his 1996 appreciation for Wired Magazine, writer David Toop remembered Baxter thus: "Baxter offered package tours in sound, selling tickets to sedentary tourists who wanted to stroll around some taboo emotions before lunch, view a pagan ceremony, go wild in the sun or conjure a demon, all without leaving home hi-fi comforts in the white suburbs." David Van Cortland Crosby (born August 14, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is a guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Leslie Townes Hope KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), best known as Bob Hope, was a famous entertainer, having appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, movies and in army concerts. ... Abbott and Costello is the name of an American comedy duo made up of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. ... Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926) is an American producer and director of low-budget films; as such, he has apprenticed many now-famous directors, stressing the importance of budgeting and resourcefulness. ... This daguerreotype of Poe was taken less than a year before his death at the age of 40. ... Martin Denny (April 10, 1911) is universally known as the founder and reining king of exotica music. ... Arthur Lyman (February 2, 1932 - February 24, 2002) popularized a jazzy style of Hawaiian music during the 1950s, and gathered a following as a purveyor of so-called exotic music or Exotica. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Wired magazine is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... Within a European Christian context, paganism is a catch-all term which has come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion (as opposed to a revealed religion of a text). ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ...


Les Baxter has a motion picture star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on 6314 Hollywood Blvd. An example of a Hollywood Walk of Fame star, for the film actress Carole Lombard. ...


External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Les Baxter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (315 words)
Les Baxter (March 14, 1922 - January 15, 1996) studied piano at the Detroit Conservatory before moving to Los Angeles for further studies at Pepperdine College.
In the 90s Baxter was widely celebrated, alongside Martin Denny (for whom he had written "Quiet Village") and Arthur Lyman Group, as one of the progenitors of what had become known as the "exotica" movement.
Les Baxter has a motion picture star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on 6314 Hollywood Blvd.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m