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Encyclopedia > Leopold Stokowski

Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. He was the founder of the New York City Symphony Orchestra and The American Symphony Orchestra. He conducted the music for and appeared in Disney’s Fantasia. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3064x4219, 2065 KB) Leopold Stokowski. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3064x4219, 2065 KB) Leopold Stokowski. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Cincinnati Music Hall As the fifth-oldest orchestra in the United States, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) has a legacy of fine music making as reflected in its performances in historic Music Hall, recordings, and international tours. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established as a commercial venture in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC in order to coax the recently retired conductor Arturo Toscanini to come to America. ... Hollywood Bowl opening night 2005. ... The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established as a commercial venture in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC in order to coax the recently retired conductor Arturo Toscanini to come to America. ... In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ... Walter Elias Disney (December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966), was an American film producer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, animator, entrepreneur, visionary, and philanthropist. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, the third in the Disney animated features canon, which was a Walt Disney experiment in animation and music. ...

Contents

Early life

He was son of Polish cabinetmaker Kopernik Józef Bolesławowicz and his Irish wife Annie Marion Moore. There is some mystery surrounding his early life. For example, no one could ever determine why he spoke with a slightly Eastern European, foreign-sounding accent as he was born and raised in London (it is surmised that this was an affectation on his part to add mystery and interest), and he also, on occasion, gave his birth year as 1887 instead of 1882. Eastern Europe is, by convention, a region defined geographically as that part of Europe covering the eastern part of the continent. ... In linguistics, an accent is a pronunciation characteristic of a particular group of people relative to another group. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Stokowski trained at the Royal College of Music (which he entered in 1896, at the age of thirteen, one of the college's youngest students ever). He sang in the choir of St. Marylebone Church and later became Assistant Organist to Sir Henry Walford Davies at The Temple Church. At the age of 16, he was elected to membership in the Royal College of Organists. In 1900 he formed the choir of St. Mary's Church, Charing Cross Road, where he trained the choirboys and played the organ. In 1902 he was appointed organist and choir director of St. James's Church, Piccadilly. He also attended Queen's College, Oxford, where he earned a Bachelor of Music degree in 1903. // The Royal College of Music from Prince Consort Road, London The Royal College of Music is a prestigious music school located in Kensington, London. ... // The Royal College of Music from Prince Consort Road, London The Royal College of Music is a prestigious music school located in Kensington, London. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... Marylebone (sometimes written St. ... An organist is a musician who plays the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... Sir Henry Walford Davies (September 6, 1869 - March 11, 1941) was a British composer, who held the title Master of the Kings Music from 1934 until 1941. ... The Temple Church. ... The Royal College of Organists or RCO, based in Birmingham, England, is the United Kingdoms national body charged with promoting organ and choral music and overseeing musical education and training for organists and choral directors. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... St. ... An organist is a musician who plays the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... St. ... Piccadilly is a major London street, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. ... The Queens College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Professional degree be merged into this article or section. ...


Professional career

In 1905 Stokowski began work in New York City as the organist and choir director of St. Bartholomew's Church. He became very popular amongst the parishoners (who included members of the Vanderbilt family) but eventually quit the position to pursue a post as an orchestra conductor. He moved to Paris for additional study before hearing that the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra would be needing a new conductor when it returned from a hiatus. So, in 1908, he began his campaign to obtain the position, writing multiple letters to the orchestra's president, Mrs. C. R. Holmes, and traveling to Cincinnati for a personal interview. Eventually he was granted the post and officially took up his duties in the fall of 1909. Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... St. ... The Vanderbilts are a prominent family in the history of the United States. ... Cincinnati Music Hall As the fifth-oldest orchestra in the United States, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) has a legacy of fine music making as reflected in its performances in historic Music Hall, recordings, and international tours. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ...


Stokowski was a great success in Cincinnati, introducing the idea of "pop concerts" and conducting the United States premieres of new works by such composers as Edward Elgar. However, in early 1912 he became sufficiently frustrated with the politics of the orchestra's board that he tendered his resignation. There was a dispute over the resignation, but on April 12 it was finally accepted. Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 â€“ 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ...


Two months later, Stokowski was appointed director of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Stokowski made his Philadelphia debut on October 11, 1912. This position would bring him some of his greatest accomplishments and recognition. It has been suggested that Stokowski quit at Cincinnati knowing full well that the job in Philadelphia was already his, or as Oscar Levant suggested in his book A Smattering of Ignorance, "he had the contract in his back pocket." The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Stokowski rapidly garnered a reputation as a showman. His flair for the theatrical included grand gestures such as throwing the sheet music on the floor to show he did not need to conduct from a score. He also experimented with lighting techniques in the concert hall, at one point conducting in a dark hall with only his head and hands lighted, at other times arranging the lights so they would cast theatrical shadows of his head and hands. His hair, always unruly, he allowed to grow long, and he combed it straight back. This created a "lion's mane" effect that he carefully nurtured (his adopted first name "Leopold", means "lion-like"). Late in the 1929-30 season, he started conducting without a baton; his free-hand manner of conducting became one of his trademarks.


On the musical side, Stokowski nurtured the orchestra and shaped the "Stokowski" sound. He encouraged "free bowing" from the string section, "free breathing" from the brass section, and continually altered the seating arrangements of the sections as well as the acoustics of the hall in order to create better sound. But he was also known for tinkering with the orchestration of famous works by such composers as Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Sibelius and Brahms. In one instance, he even revised the ending of a work - the Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture, by Tchaikovsky, so that it would sound more "triumphant" in a sort of "Hollywoody" way. He performed much the same task for Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain, discarding completely Rimsky-Korsakov's orchestration of the work in favor of his own. (In the film Fantasia, however, Stokowski did not end the work with a big climax, but allowed it to blend right into Schubert's Ave Maria). In a symphony orchestra, free bowing is a performance technique sometimes used by the string section to create a fuller sound than can be achieved by synchronized bowing. ... Orchestration is the study or practice of writing music for orchestra (or, more loosely, for any musical ensemble) or of adapting for orchestra music composed for another medium. ... 1820 portrait by Karl Stieler Beethoven redirects here. ... Tchaikovsky redirects here. ... Sibelius redirects to this article. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Romeo and Juliet is a musical work by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. ... ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Modest Mussorgsky Night on Bald Mountain (Russian: , Ivanova noch na lïsoy gore, ) usually refers to one of two compositions – either a seldom performed early (1867) tone poem by Modest Mussorgsky, or a later (1886) and very popular fantasy for orchestra by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov, based almost entirely on Mussorgsky... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (O.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (O.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a teacher of harmony and... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, the third in the Disney animated features canon, which was a Walt Disney experiment in animation and music. ... Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Ave Maria (Latin: Hail, Maria or Hail, Mary) can refer to: The Hail Mary or Ave Maria, a prayer; also the time of day in Italy when the church bells toll. ...


Stokowski also claimed to have made his own orchestration of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, in which he omitted two of the movements from the score; the composer and arranger Lucien Cailliet actually created the orchestration. Conductor Leopold Stokowski first introduced Ravels orchestration of Mussorgskys Pictures at an Exhibition to Philadelphia audiences. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 Pictures at an Exhibition (Russian: , Kartínki s výstavki – Vospominániye o Víktore Gártmane, Pictures from an Exhibition – a Remembrance of Viktor Hartmann) is a famous suite of ten piano pieces composed by Modest Mussorgsky in 1874. ... Lucien Cailliet (May 27, 1897 - January 3, 1985) was an American composer, conductor, arranger and clarinetist. ...


Stokowski's repertoire was broad and included contemporary works. In 1916, he conducted the United States premiere of Mahler's 8th Symphony. He added works by Rachmaninoff, Sibelius and Igor Stravinsky. This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasil’evič Rachmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Sibelius redirects to this article. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer best known for three compositions from his earlier, Russian period: LOiseau de feu (The Firebird) (1910), Petrushka (1911), and Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) (1913). ...


In 1917 he made his very first recordings for the Victor Talking Machine Company, beginning with two of Brahms' Hungarian Dances. He found ways to make the best use of the acoustical process, until electrical recording was introduced by Victor in the spring of 1925. Among his first electrical recordings was Marche Slave by Tchaikovsky. These early recordings were made at Victor's Camden, New Jersey studios. Then, in 1927, Victor began recording the orchestra in the Academy of Music in Philadelphia. Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra later participated in long playing, high fidelity, and stereophonic experiments, during the early 1930s, mostly for Bell Laboratories. (Victor even released some LPs at this time, which were not commercially successful because they required special, expensive phonographs that most people could not afford during the Great Depression.) Stokowski recorded prodigiously for various labels until shortly before his death. His very last recording, for Columbia, was a remarkably youthful performance of the Symphony in C by Bizet, with the National Philharmonic Orchestra in London. Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... The Hungarian Dances (German: Ungarische Tänze) by Johannes Brahms (WoO 1), are a set of 21 lively dance tunes based on Hungarian themes. ... Slavonic March (also commonly known by its French title Marche slave) is a musical composition written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Academy of Music, as a proper noun, may be all or part of the full name of a conservatory, concert hall, opera house, orchestra (generally with an associated chorus), or an organization to promote and recognze excellence in musical performance. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor... The Great Depression was an economic downturn which started in 1929 and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... Symphony in C may refer to a number of symphonies written in the key of C Major: Symphonies referred to by their key exclusively Symphony in C (Wagner) - Richard Wagners Symphony in C (composed 1831, premiered 1832) Symphony in C (Bizet) - Georges Bizets Symphony in C (1855) Symphony... Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875), was a French composer of the romantic era best known for his opera Carmen. ... The National Philharmonic Orchestra is a British orchestra created exclusively for recording purposes. ...


In 1933, he started "Youth Concerts" for younger audiences, which are still a Philadelphia tradition, and fostered youth music programs. He was very much a man of his times, and he understood his times well. He was famous for transcribing many of the major organ works of J. S. Bach for Wagnerian-sized orchestra, his goal being to bring this magnificent music to a wider audience. While much admired in their day, these transcriptions are little played now, and are considered by some to be bastardizations of the works. However, today the organ works of Bach are widely heard in their original form via recordings and concerts, much more so than during Stokowski's time. Whether his transcriptions encouraged this resurgence of interest in Bach's organ music is a matter of debate. For other people named Bach and other meanings of the word, see Bach (disambiguation). ...


After disputes with the board, Stokowski began to withdraw from involvement in the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1935 onwards, allowing co-conductor Eugene Ormandy to gradually take over. Eugene Ormandy in the 1950s Eugene Ormandy (November 18, 1899 – March 12, 1985) was a conductor and violinist. ...


In 1937, Stokowski appeared as himself in the motion picture One Hundred Men and a Girl, with Deanna Durbin and Adolphe Menjou. One Hundred Men and a Girl is a 1937 musical comedy film. ... Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Adolphe Menjou Adolphe Jean Menjou (February 18, 1890 – October 29, 1963) was an American actor of French and Irish descent. ...


In 1939, Stokowski collaborated with Walt Disney to create the motion picture for which he is best known — Fantasia. He conducted all the music (with the exception of a "jam session" in the middle of the film) and included his own orchestrations for the "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" and "Night on Bald Mountain/Ave Maria" segments. Stokowski even got to talk to (and shake hands with) Mickey Mouse on screen, although he would later say with a smile that Mickey Mouse got to shake hands with him. Most of the music was recorded in the Academy of Music and multi-track stereophonic sound. Walter Elias Disney (December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966), was an American film producer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, animator, entrepreneur, visionary, and philanthropist. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, the third in the Disney animated features canon, which was a Walt Disney experiment in animation and music. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become a symbol for The Walt Disney Company. ...


In 1940, Stokowski formed the All-American Youth Orchestra, which took multiple tours overseas and was met with rave reviews. During this time he also became a frequent conductor of the NBC Symphony Orchestra, while the NBC's regular conductor, Arturo Toscanini, had many guest engagements with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established as a commercial venture in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC in order to coax the recently retired conductor Arturo Toscanini to come to America. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ...


In 1944, on the recommendation of Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, Stokowski helped form the New York City Symphony Orchestra, which they intended would make music accessible for middle-class workers. Ticket prices were set low, and performances took place at convenient, after-work hours. Many early concerts were standing room only; however, a year later in 1945, Stokowski was at odds with the board (who wanted to trim expenses even further) and he resigned. Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ...


In 1945, he founded the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra lasted for two years before it was disbanded. (It was restarted in 1991, under John Mauceri.) Then in the late 1940s, Stokowski became chief Guest Conductor of the New York Philharmonic. John Mauceri, music director, producer and composer for theatre, opera and television was born in New York, 1945. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States. ...


After the NBC Symphony Orchestra was disbanded as the official ensemble of the NBC radio network, it was re-formed as the Symphony of the Air with Stokowski as Music Director, and as such performed many concerts from 1954 until 1963. From 1955 to 1961, Stokowski was also the Music Director of the Houston Symphony Orchestra. Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in Carnegie Hall The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC as a vehicle for conductor Arturo Toscanini. ... Jones Hall The Houston Symphony Orchestra is one of the United States of Americas major orchestras, based, as its name suggests, in Houston, Texas. ...


In 1962, at the age of 80, Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. He served as Music Director for the orchestra, until May 1972 when, at the age of 90, he returned to England. In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ...


In 1976, he signed a recording contract with RCA Records that would have kept him active until he was 100 years old. However, he died of a heart attack the following year in Nether Wallop, Hampshire at the age of 95. RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ...


Personal life

Stokowski married three times. His first wife was the American concert pianist Olga Samaroff (born Lucie Hickenlooper) to whom he was married from 1911 until 1923 (one daughter: Sonia Stokowski, an actress). His second wife was Johnson & Johnson heiress Evangeline Love Brewster Johnson, an artist and aviator, to whom he was married from 1926 until 1937 (two children: Gloria Luba Stokowski and Andrea Sadja Stokowski). His third wife, from 1945 until 1955, was railroad heiress Gloria Vanderbilt (born 1924), an artist and fashion designer (two sons, Leopold Stanislaus Stokowski b. 1950 and Christopher Stokowski b. 1952). He also had a much-publicized affair with Greta Garbo. Olga Samaroff (August 8, 1880 – May 17, 1948) was a pianist, music critic, and teacher. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... Gloria Vanderbilt, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Greta Garbo (September 17, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish actress, by reputation one of the greatest and most inscrutable movie stars ever to be produced by MGM and the Hollywood studio system. ...


Trivia

  • His popularity was such that he was caricatured in several Warner Bros. cartoons (including Long-Haired Hare) with Bugs Bunny playing Leopold.
  • He was known for conducting without a baton, using only his hand gestures.

"Christopher Lloyd says that his model for creating the character [of Dr. Emmett Brown in the Back to the Future series] was actually the conductor Leopold Stokowski, with the hair that way, and the big, broad gestures. Doc Brown walks around like he's conducting the orchestra of the world." - Bob Gale Warner Bros. ... This article describes a Looney Tunes cartoon. ... Bugs Bunny is an Academy Award-winning fictional street-smart anthropomorphic gray rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Christopher Allen Lloyd (born October 22, 1938, Stamford, Connecticut) is an American character actor. ... Doctor Emmett Lathrop Doc Brown is a fictional character, one of the lead characters in the Back to the Future motion picture trilogy, played by actor Christopher Lloyd in the three films and the live action sequences of the animated series. ... Back to the Future is an American science fiction/comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and released in 1985. ...


Bibliography

Rollin Smith (2005) "Stokowski and the Organ". Oliver Daniel (1911-1990) was an American arts administrator, musicologist, and composer. ...


Notable premieres

In concert

Edgar (or Edgard) Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer, who moved to the United States in 1915, and took American citizenship in 1926. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... The Piano Concerto No. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (Russian: , Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a piece of classical music for orchestra and solo piano by Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Sergei Rachmaninoffs Third Symphony in A minor, Op. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg, (the anglicized form of Schönberg—Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he became a U.S. citizen) (September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was a composer, born in Vienna, Austria. ... The Violin Concerto by Arnold Schoenberg dates from Schoenbergs time in the United States of America, where he had moved in 1933 to escape the Nazis. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg, (the anglicized form of Schönberg—Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he became a U.S. citizen) (September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was a composer, born in Vienna, Austria. ... Arnold Schoenbergs Piano Concerto, Op. ... Eduard Steuermann (June 18, 1892 - November 11, 1964) was an American pianist and composer of Polish birth. ... The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established as a commercial venture in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC in order to coax the recently retired conductor Arturo Toscanini to come to America. ... NY redirects here. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Charles Edward Ives (October 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954) was an American composer of classical music. ... The Symphony No. ... In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 7th Avenue, occupying the east stretch of 7th Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... NY redirects here. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ...

On record

Contrary to what Rachel Lewis believes. ... The Symphony No. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Victor (Latin for winner) is a first name normally given to boys. ... Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich (Russian Дмитрий Дмитриевич Шостакович) (September 25, 1906 – August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... The Symphony No. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... Victor (Latin for winner) is a first name normally given to boys. ... Ralph Vaughan Williams (October 12, 1872 – August 26, 1958) was an influential British composer. ... Ralph Vaughan Williamss Symphony in E minor, known as Symphony No. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... There are several people and things named Ives: Charles Ives, United States classical music composer Currier & Ives, U.S. lithographer Edward Ives, U.S. toymaker Frederick Ives, photography pioneer Harry Ives, U.S. toymaker Ives Manufacturing Company, American toy manufacturer (1868-1932) Ives (wine), a type of wine This is... The Symphony No. ... In 1962, at the age of 80, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra. ...

External links

Preceded by
Frank van der Stucken
Music Director, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
1909–1912
Succeeded by
Ernst Kunwald
Preceded by
Carl Pohlig
Music Director, Philadelphia Orchestra
1912–1938
Succeeded by
Eugene Ormandy
Preceded by
Ferenc Fricsay
Music Director, Houston Symphony Orchestra
1955–1961
Succeeded by
John Barbirolli

  Results from FactBites:
 
Leopold Stokowski, All-American Youth Orchestra, Forever Young (1640 words)
Stokowski took full advantage of the AAYO's ability and desire to respond to his exclusive direction, and produced performances that went even beyond the interpretive extremes that were both the bane and the glory of his deeply personal art.
Stokowski was a capricious conductor who delighted in tweaking interpretive tradition, particularly in the standard repertoire.
Instead of the steady sensual buildup of the score, Stokowski's volume and tempo heave and lurch: he adds a huge swell of sound to the end of each repetition of the sinuous melody, and the whole thing is over in a mere twelve minutes (rather than a "normal" sixteen or so).
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