FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Leonard Wood
Jump to: navigation, search

Leonard Wood (October 9, 1860August 7, 1927) was a physician who served as the US Army Chief of Staff and Governor General of the Philippines. He later became a recipient of the Medal of Honor. Jump to: navigation, search October 9 is the 282nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (283rd in Leap years). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Jump to: navigation, search August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Physician examining a child The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... Categories: United States-related stubs | United States Army | Joint Chiefs of Staff ... The Governor-General of the Philippines was the chief political executive of the Philippines from 1901 to 1935, during the period when they were governed by the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...

Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood
Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood

Leonard Wood (from wood. ... Leonard Wood (from wood. ...

Biography

Born in Winchester, New Hampshire, he attended Pierce Academy in Middleborough, Massachusetts and Harvard Medical School, earning an M.D. degree in 1884 as an intern at Boston City Hospital. Winchester is a town located in Cheshire County, New Hampshire. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch (D) Senators Judd Gregg (R) John Sununu (R) Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  - Land 23,249 km²  - Water 814 km² (3. ... Middleborough is a town located in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ...


He took a position as an Army contract physician in 1885, and was stationed at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. Wood participated in the last campaign against Geronimo in 1886, and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1898 for carrying dispatches 100 miles through hostile territory and for commanding an infantry detachment whose officers had been lost. Fort Huachuca is a military installation in Southeastern Arizona, in the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Grand Canyon State, The Copper State Other U.S. States Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Governor Janet Napolitano (D) Senators John McCain (R) Jon Kyl (R) Official languages English Only State Area 295,254 km² (6th)  - Land 294,312 km²  - Water 942 km... Jump to: navigation, search Geronimo Geronimo (Chiricahua Goyaałé One Who Yawns; often spelled Goyathlay in English), (June 16, 1829–February 17, 1909) was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who long warred against the encroachment of settlers of European descent on tribal lands. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Wood was personal physician to Presidents Grover Cleveland and William McKinley through 1898. It was during this period he developed a friendship with Theodore Roosevelt, then assistant secretary of the Navy. Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Jump to: navigation, search The name Mckinley redirects here. ... Jump to: navigation, search Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the 26th (1901–09) President of the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ...


At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, Wood, with Roosevelt, organized the 1st Volunteer Cavalry regiment, popularly known as the Rough Riders. Wood commanded the regiment in a successful engagement known as the Battle of Las Guasimas. When brigade commander, Samuel B. M. Young became ill, Wood received a field promotion to brigadier general of volunteers and assumed command of the 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, V Corps (which included the Rough Riders) and led the brigade to a famous victory at Kettle Hill and San Juan Heights. Jump to: navigation, search The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States of America gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ... Italian cavalry officers practice their horsemanship in 1904 outside Rome. ... Jump to: navigation, search A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ... Roosevelt and the Rough Riders atop San Juan Heights, 1898 The Rough Riders was the name bestowed by the American press on the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry regiment during the Spanish-American War. ... The Battle of Las Guasimas was the first true clash of arms in the Cuban campaign of the Spanish-American War. ... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... Samuel Baldwin Marks Young (1840 - 1924) was a U.S. general. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Battle of San Juan Hill Conflict Spanish-American War Date July 1, 1898 Place near Santiago, Cuba Result American victory The Battle of San Juan Hill was the bloodiest and most famous battle of the Spanish-American War. ...


After San Juan, Wood led the 2nd Cavalry Brigade for the rest of the war; he stayed in Cuba after the war and was appointed the Military Governor of Santiago in 1898, and of Cuba from 1899–1902. In that capacity he relied on his medical experience to institute improvements to the medical and sanitary conditions in Cuba. He was promoted to brigadier general of regulars shortly before moving to his next assignment. Santiago de Cuba is the capital city of Santiago de Cuba Province in eastern Cuba. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The Regular Army is the name given to the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime. ...


In 1902 he proceeded to the Philippines, where he served in the capacity of commander of the Philippines Division and later as commander of the Department of the East. He was promoted to major general in 1903, and served as governor of Moro province from 1903–06. During this period he was in charge of several bloody campaigns against Filipino troops, which was to be the beginning of his unpopularity there. Jump to: navigation, search 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Moro may refer to: Moro Islamic Liberation Front Moro reflex Moors The term Moro (pl. ...


Wood was named Army Chief of Staff in 1910 by President Taft, whom he had met while both were in the Philippines; he remains the only medical officer to have ever held that position. As Chief of Staff, Wood implemented several programs, among which were the forerunner of the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program, and the Preparedness Movement, a campaign for universal military training and wartime conscription. The Preparedness Movement plan was scrapped in favor of the Selective Service System, shortly before World War I. He developed the Mobile Army, thus laying the groundwork for American success in WWI. He also created the General Staff Corps. Categories: United States-related stubs | United States Army | Joint Chiefs of Staff ... Jump to: navigation, search 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ... The Preparedness Movement was a campaign led by Leonard Wood and Theodore Roosevelt to strengthen the US military. ... The Selective Service System is the means by which the United States administers military conscription. ... Jump to: navigation, search World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... A General Staff is a group of professional military officers who act in a staff or administrative role under the command of a general officer. ...


In 1914, Wood was replaced as Chief of Staff by William Wotherspoon. With the US entry into World War I, Wood was recommended by Republicans, in particular Henry Cabot Lodge, to be the U.S. field commander; however, War Secretary Newton Baker instead appointed John J. Pershing, amid much controversy. During the war, Wood was instead put in charge of the training of the 10th and 89th Infantry Divisions, both at Camp Funston. In 1915, he published The Military Obligation of Citizenship, and in 1916 Our Military History. Jump to: navigation, search 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... William Wallace Wotherspoon (1850 - 1921) was a U.S. general. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924), was a Republican statesman and noted historian. ... 1927 Time cover featuring Baker Newton Diehl Baker (December 3, 1871–December 25, 1937) was an American politician in the Democratic Party, and a notable figure in the Progressive movement. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry). ... The 89th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. World War I Activated: August 1917. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ...


Wood was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in the election of 1920. Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


He retired from the Army in 1921, and was made Governor General of the Philippines, in which capacity he served from 1921 to 1927. He was noted for his harsh, unpopular policies. Jump to: navigation, search 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Governor-General of the Philippines was the chief political executive of the Philippines from 1901 to 1935, during the period when they were governed by the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Wood died in Boston, Massachusetts after undergoing surgery for a brain tumor that had resulted from an earlier head injury. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Location Location in Massachusetts Government Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas Menino (Dem) Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 89. ... A typical modern surgery operation For other meanings of the word, see Surgery (disambiguation) Surgery (from the Greek cheirourgia - lit. ... See the article about cancer for the main article about malignant tumors. ... Arlington Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, is an American military cemetery established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Robert E. Lees home. ...


Camp Leonard Wood in Missouri, now Fort Leonard Wood, home of the U.S. Army Chemical School, was named in his honor, as was the USS Leonard Wood (AP-25/APA-12). Fort Leonard Wood is a United States Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) post located in the Missouri Ozarks. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


Medal of Honor citation

Voluntarily carried dispatches through a region infested with hostile Indians, making a journey of 70 miles in one night and walking 30 miles the next day. Also for several weeks, while in close pursuit of Geronimo's band and constantly expecting an encounter, commanded a detachment of Infantry, which was then without an officer, and to the command of which he was assigned upon his own request.

US Army -- Medal of Honor File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jump to: navigation, search Geronimo Geronimo (Chiricahua Goyaałé One Who Yawns; often spelled Goyathlay in English), (June 16, 1829–February 17, 1909) was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who long warred against the encroachment of settlers of European descent on tribal lands. ...

External links

  • Fort Leonard Wood's website
Preceded by:
J. Franklin Bell
Chief of Staff of the United States Army
1910–1914
Succeeded by:
William W. Wotherspoon
Preceded by:
Charles Yeater
Governor-General of the Philippines
1921-1927
Succeeded by:
Eugene Allen Gilmore

  Results from FactBites:
 
Leonard Wood - definition of Leonard Wood in Encyclopedia (726 words)
Leonard Wood (October 9, 1860 – August 7, 1927) was a physician who served as the US Army Chief of Staff and Governor General of the Philippines.
Wood participated in the last campaign against Geronimo, and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1898 for carrying dispatches 100 miles through hostile territory and for commanding an infantry detachment whose officers had been lost.
Wood commanded the regiment in a successful engagement known as the Battle of Las Guasimas, and later led them to a famous victory at Kettle Hill and San Juan Heights as commander of a larger force to which the Rough Riders were attached.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m