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Encyclopedia > Lenny Bruce
Lenny Bruce
Born October 13, 1925
Long Island, New York, United States
Died August 3, 1966 (aged 40)
Los Angeles, California, United States
Medium stand-up, film, television, books
Nationality Flag of the United States American
Years active 1947-1966
Genres Satire/Political satire, Black comedy, Improvisational comedy
Subject(s) American culture, American politics, race relations, religion, human sexuality, obscenity, stand-up comedians
Influenced Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Richard Belzer, Sam Kinison, Eddie Izzard, Bill Hicks, Lewis Black, Jon Stewart, Daniele Luttazzi
Spouse Honey Harlow (June 15, 1951 - January 21, 1957) 1 child
Notable works and roles The Lenny Bruce Originals
The Carnegie Hall Concert
How to Talk Dirty and Influence People

Lenny Bruce (October 13, 1925August 3, 1966), born Leonard Alfred Schneider, was a controversial American stand-up comedian, writer, social critic and satirist of the 1950s and 1960s. His 1964 conviction in an obscenity trial was also controversial, eventually leading to the first posthumous pardon in New York history. Image File history File links Lennyfce. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... NY redirects here. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Richard Pryor hits the money line A stand-up comedian or stand-up comic is someone that performs in comedy clubs, usually reciting a fast paced succession of amusing stories, short jokes and one-liners, typically called a monologue. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... [1]#redirect Book ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Comedy may be divided into multiple genres based on the source of humour, the method of delivery, and the context in which it is delivered. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Political satire is a subgenre of general satire that specializes in gaining entertainment from politics, politicians and public affairs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Improvisational comedy (also called improv) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ... This article very generally discusses the customs and culture of the United States; for the culture of the United States, see arts and entertainment in the United States. ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States politics is dominated by the two major parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. ... Race relations is the area of sociology that studies the social, political, and economic relations between races at all different levels of society. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... Obscenity in Latin obscenus, meaning foul, repulsive, detestable, (possibly derived from ob caenum, literally from filth). The term is most often used in a legal context to describe expressions (words, images, actions) that offend the prevalent sexual morality of the time. ... Richard Pryor hits the money line A stand-up comedian or stand-up comic is someone that performs in comedy clubs, usually reciting a fast paced succession of amusing stories, short jokes and one-liners, typically called a monologue. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... George Dennis Carlin (born May 12, 1937 in New York, New York)[2] is a Grammy-winning American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. ... Richard Jay Belzer (born August 4, 1944) is an American stand up comedian, writer and actor, perhaps best known for his work as Det. ... A caricature of Sam Kinison exhibiting the aggression and anger of his stand-up comedy acts. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This Section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lewis Niles Black (born August 30, 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning American stand-up comedian, author, playwright, and actor. ... Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz on November 28, 1962) is an American comedian, satirist, actor, writer, author, and producer. ... Daniele Luttazzi Daniele Luttazzi (born in Santarcangelo di Romagna, Rimini, January 26, 1961), real name Daniele Fabbri, is an Italian comedian, writer, satirist, illustrator and singer/songwriter. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... How to Talk Dirty and Influence People is an autobiography by Lenny Bruce, the scathing social satirist and comedian, who died in 1966 at age 40 of a morphine overdose. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Pryor hits the money line A stand-up comedian or stand-up comic is someone that performs in comedy clubs, usually reciting a fast paced succession of amusing stories, short jokes and one-liners, typically called a monologue. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... A posthumous recognition is a ceremonial award given after the recipient has passed away. ...

Contents

Early life

Leonard Alfred Schneider was born in Mineola, Long Island, New York, grew up in Bellmore, NY, and attended Wellington C. Mepham High School circa 1940.[2] His youth was chaotic, his parents divorcing when he was five years old, and saw Lenny moving in with various relatives over the next decade. His mother, Sally Marr, was a stage performer who had an enormous influence on Bruce's career. After spending time working on a farm with a family which provided the stable surroundings he needed, he joined the U.S. Navy at the age of 17 in 1942, and saw active duty in Europe until his discharge in 1946. Mineola is a village in Nassau County, New York, USA. The population was 19,233 at the 2000 census. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... NY redirects here. ... Welcome to the Bellmores sign on Sunrise Highway. ... Wellington C. Mepham High School is a high school located in Bellmore, New York. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ...


In 1947, soon after changing his last name to Bruce, he earned $12 and a free spaghetti dinner for his first stand-up performance in Brooklyn, New York. From that modest start, he got his first break as a guest (and introduced by his mother, who called herself "Sally Bruce") on the Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts Show, doing a "Bavarian mimic" doing impressions of American movie stars (e.g., Humphrey Bogart). For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Arthur Godfreys Talent Scouts (also known as Talent Scouts) was a television variety show which ran on CBS from 1948 until 1958. ...


In 1951, he was arrested in Miami, Florida, for impersonating a priest. He was soliciting donations for a leper colony in British Guiana after he legally chartered the "Brother Mathias Foundation" (a name of his own invention- but possible taken from the actual Brother Matthias who had befriended Babe Ruth at the orphanage that Ruth had been confined to as a child), and, unknown to the police, stole several priests' clergy shirts and a clerical collar while posing as a laundry man. He was found not guilty due to the legality of the New York state-chartered foundation, the actual existence of the Guiana leper colony, and the inability of the local clergy to expose him as an impostor. Later in his semifictional autobiography How to Talk Dirty and Influence People, he revealed that he had made approximately $8,000 in three weeks, sending $2,500 to the leper colony and keeping the rest. For other uses, see Miami (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the malady found in the Hebrew Bible, see the article Tzaraath. ... British Guiana and its boundary lines, 1896 Flag of British Guiana British Guiana was the name of the British colony on the northern coast of South America, now the independent nation of Guyana. ... George Herman Ruth, Jr. ... A leper colony is a place to quarantine people with leprosy from the rest of the population. ... How to Talk Dirty and Influence People is an autobiography by Lenny Bruce, the scathing social satirist and comedian, who died in 1966 at age 40 of a morphine overdose. ...


Career

Bruce's early comedy career included writing the screenplays for Dance Hall Racket in 1953, which featured Lenny, his wife, Honey Harlow, and mother, Sally Marr, in roles; Dream Follies in 1954, a low-budget burlesque romp; and a children's film, The Rocket Man, in 1954. He also released four albums of original material on Berkeley-based Fantasy Records, with rants, comic routines, and satirical interviews on the themes that made him famous: jazz, moral philosophy, politics, patriotism, religion, law, race, abortion, drugs, the Ku Klux Klan, Jewishness, and the Roman Catholic Church. These albums were later compiled and re-released as The Lenny Bruce Originals. Two later records were produced and sold by Bruce himself, including a 10-inch album of the 1961 San Francisco performances that started his legal troubles. Starting in the late 1960s, other unissued Bruce material was released by Alan Douglas, Frank Zappa and Phil Spector, as well as Fantasy. Bruce developed the complexity and tone of his material in Enrico Banducci's North Beach nightclub the "hungry i," where Mort Sahl had earlier made a name for himself. Dance Hall Racket is a low-budget but intriguing 1953 film featuring Lenny Bruce, who wrote the script, and his wife Honey Harlow. ... Photograph of Sally Rand, 1934. ... Fantasy Records is a United States based record label, which was founded by Max and Sol Weiss in 1949 in San Francisco, California. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Defence of the fatherland is a commonplace of patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... For other uses, see Race (disambiguation). ... An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Harvey Philip Spector (born December 26, 1939) is an American musician, songwriter, and record producer. ... Enrico Banducci was the legendary North Beach San Francisco impresario who operated the hungry i nightclub and launched the careers of Lenny Bruce, Mort Sahl, Bill Cosby, Jonathan Winters, and Barbra Streisand, as well as countless folk singers. ... Looking south-east Columbus Street (on the left), Stockton (on the right), and Green Street (not visible). ... The hungry i was a legendary San Francisco nightclub operated in the mid-1950s and early 1960s by Enrico Banducci at 599 Jackson Street in the North Beach district. ... Time Magazine, August 15, 1960 Morton Lyon Sahl (born May 11, 1927) is a Montreal-born actor/comedian/humorist credited with pioneering a style of stand-up comedy that paved the way for Lenny Bruce, Nichols & May, Dick Gregory, and others less famous. ...


His growing fame led to appearances on the nationally televised Steve Allen Show, where on his debut Lenny commented on the recent marriage of Elizabeth Taylor to Eddie Fisher by making his first line an unscripted "Will Elizabeth Taylor become bar mitzvahed?". He also began getting mainstream press, both favorable and derogatory. Hy Gardner, the syndicated Broadway columnist called Bruce a "fad" and "a one-time-around freak attraction," and Variety declared him "undisciplined and unfunny." But influential San Francisco columnist Herb Caen was an early and enthusiastic supporter, writing in 1959: Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian and writer instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Eddie Fisher (born August 10, 1928) is an American singer and entertainer. ... When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (בר מצו&#1493... Hy Gardner (December 2, 1908 – June 17, 1989) was a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, host of The Hy Gardner Show, and a regular panelist on the first incarnation of To Tell The Truth. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Herbert Eugene Caen (April 3, 1916 – February 1, 1997) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist working in San Francisco. ...

"They call Lenny Bruce a sick comic, and sick he is. Sick of all the pretentious phoniness of a generation that makes his vicious humor meaningful. He is a rebel, but not without a cause, for there are shirts that need un-stuffing, egos that need deflating. Sometimes you feel guilty laughing at some of Lenny's mordant jabs, but that disappears a second later when your inner voice tells you, with pleased surprise, 'But that's true'."

On February 3, 1961, in the midst of a severe blizzard, he gave a famous performance at Carnegie Hall in New York. Recorded and later released as a three-disc set, the Carnegie Hall Concert was considered by many to be the best of his appearances. In the liner notes, critic Albert Goldman described it as follows: Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Albert Harry Goldman (crazy jew) (April 15, 1927 – March 28, 1994) was an American professor and author. ...

This was the moment that an obscure yet rapidly rising young comedian named Lenny Bruce chose to give one of the greatest performances of his career. ... The performance contained in this album is that of a child of the jazz age. Lenny worshipped the gods of Spontaneity, Candor and Free Association. He fancied himself an oral jazzman. His ideal was to walk out there like Charlie Parker, take that mike in his hand like a horn and blow, blow, blow everything that came into his head just as it came into his head with nothing censored, nothing translated, nothing mediated, until he was pure mind, pure head sending out brainwaves like radio waves into the heads of every man and woman seated in that vast hall. Sending, sending, sending, he would finally reach a point of clairvoyance where he was no longer a performer but rather a medium transmitting messages that just came to him from out there -- from recall, fantasy, prophecy. A point at which, like the practitioners of automatic writing, his tongue would outrun his mind and he would be saying things he didn't plan to say, things that surprised, delighted him, cracked him up -- as if he were a spectator at his own performance![3] A Free Association is an association which meets certain mostly negative criteria. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... For the article about the album by Ataxia, see Automatic Writing (album). ...

Legal troubles

On October 4, 1961 Bruce was arrested for obscenity at the Jazz Workshop in San Francisco; he had used the words cocksucker and riffed that "'to' is a preposition, 'come' is a verb" and that the sexual climax of "come" is so common that it bears no weight, and that if someone hearing it becomes upset, they "probably can't come." Although the jury acquitted him, other law enforcement agencies began monitoring his appearances, resulting in frequent arrests under charges of obscenity. The increased scrutiny also led to an arrest in Philadelphia for drug possession in the same year, and again in Los Angeles, California, two years later. Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... d Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


By the end of 1963, he had become a target of the Manhattan district attorney, Frank Hogan, who was working closely with Francis Cardinal Spellman, the Archbishop of New York. In April 1964, he appeared twice at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village, with undercover police detectives in the audience. On both occasions, he was arrested after leaving the stage, the complaints again resting on his use of various obscenities. Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Francis Joseph Cardinal Spellman, (4 May 1889–2 December 1967) was an American prelate, the ninth bishop and sixth archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... St. ... Cafe Au Go Go was a Greenwich Village night club located in the basement of 152 Bleecker Street beneath the Garrick Theater. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ...


A three-judge panel presided over his widely-publicized six-month trial, with Bruce and club owner Howard Solomon being found guilty of obscenity on November 4, 1964. The conviction was announced despite positive testimony and petitions of support from Woody Allen, Bob Dylan, Jules Feiffer, Allen Ginsberg, Norman Mailer, William Styron, and James Baldwin, among other artists, writers and educators, as well as Manhattan journalist and television personality Dorothy Kilgallen and sociologist Herbert Gans. Bruce was sentenced on December 21, 1964, to four months in the workhouse; he was set free on bail during the appeals process and died before the appeal was decided. Solomon's conviction was eventually overturned by New York's highest court, the New York Court of Appeals, in 1970. Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... William Clark Styron, Jr. ... James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, poet, and essayist, best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. ... Dorothy Mae Kilgallen (July 3, 1913 – November 8, 1965) was an Irish-American journalist and television game show panelist, perhaps best known nationally for her syndicated newspaper column, The Voice of Broadway, and her role as panelist on the television game show Whats My Line?. She was born in... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Last years

Poster for Lenny Bruce's last series of appearances (at The Fillmore).
Poster for Lenny Bruce's last series of appearances (at The Fillmore).

Despite his prominence as a comedian, Bruce only appeared on network television six times in his life. In his later club performances, Bruce was known for relating the details of his encounters with the police directly in his comedy routine; his criticism encouraged the police to eye him with maximum scrutiny. These performances often included rants about his court battles over obscenity charges, tirades against fascism and complaints of his denial to the right to free speech. Image File history File links Lenny_Bruce_at_the_Fillmore. ... Image File history File links Lenny_Bruce_at_the_Fillmore. ... The Fillmore (also known as the Fillmore Auditorium or, for several years, The Elite Club), is a historic music venue in San Francisco, California made famous by Bill Graham (1931–1991). ...


He was banned outright from several U.S. cities, and in 1962 he was banned from performing in Sydney, Australia. At his first show there, he got up on stage, declared "What a fucking wonderful audience" and was promptly arrested. On November 22, 1963 in New York City, the day when U.S. President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated in Dallas, Texas, he opened an evening performance (many, if not most, entertainers had cancelled their shows that night) by walking onstage slowly, shaking his head sadly, and saying "Poor Vaughn Meader!"-- an allusion to the impressionist who had recorded a series of best-selling comedy albums impersonating the president and his family)[citation needed]. The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ... Vaughn Meader (center, right) featured on the cover of The First Family, c. ...


Increasing drug use also affected his health. By 1966 he had been blacklisted by nearly every nightclub in the United States, as owners feared prosecution for obscenity. Bruce did have one final triumphant performance at The Berkeley Community Theater in Dec. 1965; a focused listening to the concert recording reveals a straight and very lucid Bruce at his very best. His last performance was on June 25, 1966, at the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, on a bill with Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention. The performance was not remembered fondly by Bill Graham, who described Bruce as "whacked out on amphetamines" and finished his set emotionally disturbed. Zappa asked Bruce to sign his draft card, but the suspicious Bruce refused. A blacklist is a list or register of entities who, for one reason or another, are being denied a particular privilege, service, or mobility. ... The Fillmore (also known as the Fillmore Auditorium or, for several years, The Elite Club), is a historic music venue in San Francisco, California made famous by Bill Graham (1931–1991). ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... The Mothers of Invention were a rock and roll band active from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... Cover of Bill Graham Presents Bill Graham (January 8, 1931–October 25, 1991) was a well-known rock concert promoter, who flourished from the 1960s until his death. ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ...


At the request of Hugh Hefner, Bruce (with the aid of Paul Krassner) wrote his autobiography, which was serialized in Playboy in 1964 and 1965, and later published as the book How to Talk Dirty and Influence People. Hefner, a long-time foe of censorship, had long assisted Bruce's career, featuring him on the television debut of Playboy's Penthouse in October, 1959. Hugh Marston Hefner (born April 9, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois), also referred to colloquially as Hef, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine. ... Paul Krassner (born April 9, 1932) was editor and frequent contributor to the Freethought magazine The Realist, which, first published in 1958, is a very early example of the countercultural press in the United States. ... Playboy is an American mens magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... How to Talk Dirty and Influence People is an autobiography by Lenny Bruce, the scathing social satirist and comedian, who died in 1966 at age 40 of a morphine overdose. ...


Death

On August 3, 1966, Bruce was found dead at the age of 40 in the bathroom of his Hollywood Hills home at 8825 Hollywood Boulevard. The "official" photo, taken at the scene, showed a naked Bruce, a syringe and burned bottle cap nearby, along with various other narcotics paraphernalia. His official cause of death was acute morphine poisoning caused by an accidental overdose.[1] The Hollywood Hills, an unofficial designation of part of the City of Los Angeles, California, are part of the eastern section of the low transverse range of the Santa Monica Mountains, which extends from the Los Feliz District and Hollywood, on the south side of the Valley, to Pacific Coast... Morphine (INN) (IPA: ) is a highly potent opiate analgesic drug and is the principal active agent in opium and the prototypical opiate. ...


He was interred in Eden Memorial Park Cemetery in Mission Hills, California, but an unconventional memorial on August 21 was controversial enough to keep his name in the spotlight. The service saw over 500 people pay their respects, led by legendary record producer Phil Spector. Cemetery officials had tried to block the ceremony after advertisements for the event encouraged attendees to bring box lunches and noisemakers. Dick Schaap famously eulogized Bruce in Playboy, with the memorable last line: "One last four-letter word for Lenny: Dead. At forty. That's obscene." Eden Memorial Park Cemetery is located at 11500 Sepulveda Boulevard, Mission Hills, CA. Lenny Bruce (1925-1966), comedian Howard Caine (1926-1993), actor Phil Foster (1914-1985), actor Bruce Gary (1951-2006), musician Mitzi Green (1920-1969), actress Julius Harris (1923-2004), actor Harvey Lembeck (1923-1982), actor Groucho Marx... For the community in Los Angeles, see Mission Hills, Los Angeles, California. ... Harvey Philip Spector (born December 26, 1939) is an American musician, songwriter, and record producer. ... Richard J. Schaap (September 27, 1934 – December 21, 2001) was a 20th century American sportswriter, broadcaster, and the author or co-author of 33 books. ...


Bruce is survived by his daughter, Kitty Bruce, who resides in Pennsylvania as of the 2000s. Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...

  • In December 2003, 37 years after his death, Bruce was granted a pardon for his obscenity conviction by New York governor George Pataki,[2] following a petition by Robert Corn-Revere, Ronald Collins and David Skover, the petition having been signed by several stars such as Robin Williams. It was the first posthumous pardon in the state's history. Pataki claimed his act was "a declaration of New York's commitment to upholding the First Amendment."

This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... NY redirects here. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) was the 57th Governor of New York, USA serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Robin McLaurin Williams (born July 21, 1951)[1] is an Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian who has done television, stage, and film work. ...

Posthumous credits and legacy

Lenny Bruce in 1963, his legal troubles growing.
Lenny Bruce in 1963, his legal troubles growing.
  • In 1971, one of Bruce's comedy routines was developed by San Francisco filmmaker John Magnuson (who also directed 1967's "Lenny Bruce Performance Film") into a short animated film, Thank You, Mask Man (often cited as Thank You Masked Man) which parodied The Lone Ranger (see link below). Bruce received credit for co-writing and co-directing this seven-minute cartoon and providing his unique narration, which included all of the voice characterizations.
  • In 1971, Lenny, a play by Julian Barry based on Bruce's life and work and starring Cliff Gorman, opened on Broadway. The play was developed into a 1974 film Lenny by Bob Fosse and starred Dustin Hoffman. Eddie Izzard portrayed the comedian in the 1998 London revival of Barry's play.
  • Larry Gelbart has said that Bruce's attempt to be released from military service in World War Two by dressing in a WAVES uniform was the original inspiration for the character Maxwell Q. Klinger on the sitcom M*A*S*H
  • In 2004, Bruce was voted No. 3 of the 100 Greatest Stand-ups of All Time by Comedy Central behind Richard Pryor and George Carlin, both of whom cite Bruce as an influence (Carlin was arrested as an audience member for refusing to show identification at Bruce's 1964 show at the Gate of Horn in Chicago, after the police ended the show and arrested Bruce for obscenity. They were both placed into the back of the same paddywagon together). In a similar survey conducted during 2007, Bruce was voted No. 30 of the 100 Greatest Comedy Stand-Ups by a public poll for the British Channel 4.[3]
  • A six-CD retrospective titled Let The Buyer Beware, overseen by record producer Hal Willner, was released in 2004.
  • Lenny Bruce appears as a fictionalized character in Don DeLillo's 1997 novel Underworld.
  • In 2007, Shmaltz Brewing Company of New York, as the first of its Tribute to Jewish Stars series, concocted a memorial beer for Lenny Bruce. "Bittersweet Lenny's R.I.P.A." is a double India Pale Ale with rye malt, released under Shmaltz's He'Brew label.

Image File history File links Lenny_Bruce_Mugshot_4-27-63. ... Image File history File links Lenny_Bruce_Mugshot_4-27-63. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations with varied meanings that evolved from its original meaning. ... In fiction, a narrator is a voice or character who tells the story. ... Cliff Gorman (October 13, 1936 - September 5, 2002), a native of New York City, was an American actor on stage and screen. ... Lenny is a 1974 film about the life of the comedian Lenny Bruce, starring Dustin Hoffman. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Larry Gelbart (b. ... A WAVES Photographer 3rd Class The WAVES were a World War II era division of the U.S. Navy that consisted entirely of women. ... Maxwell Q. Klinger is a fictional character from the M*A*S*H television series played by American actor Jamie Farr. ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the 1961... Robert B. Weide (born June 20, 1959) is a U.S. writer, producer, and director, perhaps best known for his documentaries and his work on Curb Your Enthusiasm. ... The Academy Award for Documentary Feature is one of the most prestigious awards for documentary films. ... Robert Mario De Niro Jr. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... George Dennis Carlin (born May 12, 1937 in New York, New York)[2] is a Grammy-winning American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. ... Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ... Hal Willner (born 1957, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a music producer working in recording, Films, TV and live events. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Rich showing off Louis Vuittons famed man bag. ... American Dreams was an American television drama program broadcast on the NBC television network. ... Lewis Niles Black (born August 30, 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning American stand-up comedian, author, playwright, and actor. ... Time Magazine, August 15, 1960 Morton Lyon Sahl (born May 11, 1927) is a Montreal-born actor/comedian/humorist credited with pioneering a style of stand-up comedy that paved the way for Lenny Bruce, Nichols & May, Dick Gregory, and others less famous. ... Shelley Berman (born 3 February 1926, in Chicago, Illinois) is a comedian, writer, teacher, and actor. ... Jonathan Lovitz (born July 21, 1957 in Tarzana, California) is an American actor and comedian perhaps best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live and for his show The Critic. ... Paul Krassner (born April 9, 1932) was editor and frequent contributor to the Freethought magazine The Realist, which, first published in 1958, is a very early example of the countercultural press in the United States. ...

Lenny Bruce in song

In part due to his freewheeling, jazz-like style, Lenny Bruce has always had fans in the music community.

  • The clip of a news broadcast featured in "7 O'Clock News/Silent Night" by Simon and Garfunkel carries the supposed newscast audio of Lenny Bruce's death. In another track on the album Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme, "A Simple Desultory Philippic (Or How I Was Robert MacNamara'd Into Submission)", Simon sings, "... and I learned the truth from Lenny Bruce."
  • Bruce is referred to in the Genesis song "Broadway Melody of 1974", in the line "Lenny Bruce, declares a truce and plays his other hand."
  • Lenny Bruce's "'to' is a preposition, 'come' is a verb..." controversy inspired the 1992 song "Big Mouth Strikes Again" by anarcho-punk band Chumbawamba. It includes a chorus which states that "TO is a preposition, COME is a verb, COME is a verb intransitive, TO COME, TO COME, Don't come in me," and a verse which details both the event and the subsequent legal proceedings.
  • Lenny Bruce is mentioned throughout the chorus of the song "Mr. Hardcore" by Nils Lofgren

Sgt. ... Simon and Garfunkel are an American popular music duo comprising Paul Simon and Arthur Art Garfunkel. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... This article is about the band. ... Its the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine) is a song by the rock band R.E.M., found on their 1987 album Document and the 1988 compilation Eponymous. ... Rent can refer to: Renting, a system of payment for the temporary use of something owned by someone else. ... La Vie Boheme (French: the Bohemian life) is a song in the musical RENT. The second part of this song (La Vie Boheme B) ends the first act of the show. ... The Stranglers are an English rock music group, formed on September 11, 1974 in Guildford, Surrey. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... For the prequel to Ico, see Shadow of the Colossus. ... The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy was a Rap/Hip-Hop band active during the early 1990s. ... The Mighty Mighty Bosstones were a ska-core band from Boston, Massachusetts (Bosstones being a play on Boston). They are credited, along with bands such as Operation Ivy and The Suicide Machines, with creating the ska-core genre, a form of ska punk that mixes to various degrees elements of... Great Big Sea (often shortened to GBS) is a Canadian folk-rock band from Newfoundland and Labrador, best known for performing energetic rock interpretations of traditional Newfoundland folk songs including sea shanties, which draw from the islands 500-year-old Irish, English, and French heritage. ... Metric is a Canadian rock band. ... Steve Earle (born Stephen Fain Earle January 17, 1955) is an American singer-songwriter, well known for his rock and country music, as well as for his political views. ... Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940–April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Pleasures of the Harbor was Phil Ochs fourth long player, and his first for A&M Records, released in 1967. ... Michael J. Pollard (born Michael J. Pollack, May 30, 1939 in Passaic, New Jersey) is an actor. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Nada Surf is an American alternative rock / indie rock group formed in 1992. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... The Mothers of Invention were a rock and roll band active from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... Tim Hardin (December 23, 1941 – December 29, 1980) was a United States folk musician and composer who was a part of the 1960s Greenwich Village folk scene and performer at the Woodstock Festival. ... For the photographer, see John Jabez Edwin Mayall. ... Grace Slick (born October 30, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter, who was one of the lead singers of the rock groups Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Starship, and also as a solo artist, for nearly three decades, from the mid-1960s to the mid-1990s. ... The Great Society was a 1960s San Francisco rock band in the burgeoning Haight Ashbury folk-psychedelic style pervasive during the time of its existence, 1965 to 1966. ... The Auteurs were a vehicle for the songwriting talents of Luke Haines (guitar, piano and vocals). ... Mickey Avalon (real name Yeshe Perl) is a rap artist from Hollywood, California. ... MDC can stand for: Multiple Description Coding Major Diagnostic Category Mega-Damage Capacity, a measure of the toughness and structural integrity of armored vehicles in the Palladium Books role-playing system MetaData Coalition - see metadata (computing) Modification Detection Code Movement for Democratic Change - A Zimbabwean political party MDC - a hardcore... Allan Sherman (sometimes incorrectly Alan and Allen), November 30, 1924 – November 20, 1973, was an American musician, parodist, satirist, and television producer. ... Widespread Panic is a southern rock band from Athens, Georgia. ... For the photographer, see John Jabez Edwin Mayall. ... John Anthony Frusciante (IPA pronunciation: ) (born March 5, 1970) is an American guitarist, singer, songwriter and record producer. ... The Bicycle Thief is a band fronted by Bob Forrest, former lead singer of Thelonious Monster and friend of Red Hot Chili Peppers Flea, Anthony Kiedis, John Frusciante and Chad Smith in their early years. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer and a founding member of The Rolling Stones in 1962. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... The anarchy symbol commonly used by anarcho-punks Anarcho-punk (sometimes known as peace-punk) is a subgenre of the punk rock movement consisting of groups and bands promoting specifically anarchist ideas. ... Chumbawamba are an English band who started out playing punk rock but over a 25-year career have gone on to play music in a wide range of styles, including pop influenced by dance music and world music, and now play acoustic folk music. ...

Books by or about Bruce

By Bruce:

  • Lenny Bruce, Stamp Help Out! (1961 and/or 1965, self-published and sold at his concerts and in hip bookshops like City Lights in SF)
  • Lenny Bruce, How to Talk Dirty and Influence People (Playboy Publishing, 1967)

By others: How to Talk Dirty and Influence People is an autobiography by Lenny Bruce, the scathing social satirist and comedian, who died in 1966 at age 40 of a morphine overdose. ...

  • Julian Barry, Lenny (play) (Grove Press, Inc. 1971)
  • Kitty Bruce, The (almost) Unpublished Lenny Bruce (1984, Running Press) (includes a graphically spruced up reproduction of 'Stamp Help Out!')
  • The Essential Lenny Bruce, compiled and edited by John Cohen (Ballantine Books, 1967)
  • Ronald Collins & David Skover, The Trials of Lenny Bruce: The Fall & Rise of an American Icon (Sourcebooks, 2002)
  • Don DeLillo, Underworld, (Simon and Schuster Inc., 1997)
  • Bradley Denton, The Calvin Coolidge Home For Dead Comedians, an award-winning collection of science fiction stories in which the title story has Lenny Bruce as one of the two protagonists.
  • Albert Goldman, with Lawrence Schiller, Ladies and Gentlemen: Lenny Bruce!! (Random House, 1971)
  • Frank Kofsky, Lenny Bruce: The Comedian as Social Critic & Secular Moralist (Monad Press, 1974)
  • Valerie Kohler Smith, Lenny (novelization based on the Barry-scripted/Fosse-directed film) (Grove Press, Inc., 1974)
  • William Karl Thomas, Lenny Bruce: The Making of a Prophet (Archon Books, 1989)

Ronald K.L. Collins is a scholar at the Arlington, Va. ... David Michael Skover is the Dean’s Distinguished Research Scholar & Professor of Law at Seattle University. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Underworld is a novel written in 1997 by Don DeLillo. ... Bradley Clayton Denton (born 1958, Towanda, Kansas) is an award-winning American science fiction author. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Albert Harry Goldman (crazy jew) (April 15, 1927 – March 28, 1994) was an American professor and author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Frank Kofsky (1935 - 1997) was an American Marxist historian and author who was a Professor of History at California State University, Sacramento, from 1969 until his death. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... For the North American Indian ceremony, see Sun Dance sundance channel is an independent film network in the United States owned by Viacom, Robert Redford, and NBC Universal. ...

References

  1. ^ Collins, Ronald; Skover, David (2002). The Trials of Lenny Bruce: The Fall and Rise of an American Icon. Sourcebooks Mediafusion, 340. ISBN 1-57071-986-1. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ 100 Greatest Comedy Stand-Ups Results on Channel 4. Accessed 13 May 2007.
Persondata
NAME Bruce, Lenny
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Schneider, Leonard Alfred (birth name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION comedian and social critic
DATE OF BIRTH October 13, 1925
PLACE OF BIRTH Long Island, New York, USA
DATE OF DEATH August 3, 1966
PLACE OF DEATH Los Angeles, California, USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Lenny Bruce FBI File (303 words)
This martyr-like quality often associated and adorned on Lenny and his life conveniently overshadows the flaws and imperfections of his personality, such as his unfair treatment of women or the fact that he would often turn his friends to police to free himself from drug charges.
Lenny revolutionized the comedy scene by striping away the superficial banality and willingly standing naked before audiences exposing his thoughts and ideas.
The work of Lenny Bruce has stood the test of time and is waiting to be rediscovered by a new generation.
Lenny Bruce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1778 words)
Lenny Bruce (October 13, 1925 – August 3, 1966), born Leonard Alfred Schneider, was a controversial American stand-up comedian, writer, social critic and satirist of the 1950s and 1960s.
Bruce was sentenced on December 21, 1964, to four months in the workhouse; he was set free on bail during the appeals process and died before the appeal was decided.
Bruce was survived by his daughter, Kitty Bruce, who resides in Pennsylvania as of the 2000s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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