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Encyclopedia > Len Wein

Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics' Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics' X-Men. June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... An Editor is a person who prepares text—typically language, but also images and sounds—for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ...

The House of Secrets #92 (July 1971), introducting Swamp Thing. Cover art by Bernie Wrightson
The House of Secrets #92 (July 1971), introducting Swamp Thing. Cover art by Bernie Wrightson

Contents

Image File history File links HouseOfSecrets92. ... Image File history File links HouseOfSecrets92. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Swamp Thing, created by Bernie Wrightson. ...


Early career

Wein's first professional comics story was "Eye of the Beholder" in DC's Teen Titans #18 (Dec. 1968), where with co-writter and fellow future-pro Marv Wolfman he introduced the male character Starfire who was eventually renamed Red Star. Late the following year, Wein was publishing anthological mystery stories for DC's The House of Secrets and Marvel's Tower of Shadows and Chamber of Darkness. He additionally began writing for DC's romance comic Secret Hearts and the company's toy-line tie-in Hot Wheels; Skywald Publications' horror-comics magazines Nightmare and Psycho and its short-lived Western comic books; and Gold Key's Mod Wheels, Boris Karloff Tales of Mystery, the toyline tie-in Microbots, and the TV-series tie-ins Star Trek and The Twilight Zone. Teen Titans redirects here. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... Red Star Red Star (a. ... Anthology may also mean a Alien Ant Farm album ANThology, see Anthology (AAF Album) An anthology is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ... House of Secrets is the name of several mystery-suspense, anthology comic book series published by DC Comics. ... This article refers to the wide variety of writing called romantic. For literature from the European Romantic movement of the 18th and 19th centuries, see Romanticism: Art and Literature. ... A display of Roman toys, including several that would be familiar to children today: a doll, dice, rattles, and toy dishes for playing house. ... Hot Wheels Car - Dodge Viper Hot Wheels® is a popular brand of toy automobile, introduced by U.S. toymaker Mattel in 1968. ... Skywald Publications was a 1970s publisher of black-and-white comics magazines, primarily the horror anthologies Nightmare, Psycho and Scream, as well as a small line of comic books. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Western fiction is a genre of literature that is typically set in any of the American states west of the Mississippi River and between the years of approximately 1860 and 1900. ... This gold key has had the logo removed to protect the owner from identification Gold Keys are made available to large top clients of Swiss Banks. ... Boris Karloff Boris Karloff (November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969), born William Henry Pratt, was a famous actor in horror films. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Star Trek collectively refers to a science-fiction franchise spanning six unique television series, 726 episodes and ten motion pictures in addition to hundreds of novels, video games, fan stories and other works of fiction all set within the same fictional universe created by Gene Roddenberry in the mid-1960s. ... The Twilight Zone original opening. ...


DC and Marvel Comics

Wein's first superhero work was not for DC but Marvel, with a one-off story in Daredevil #71 (Dec. 1970) co-written with staff writer/editor Roy Thomas. Wein later began scripting sporadic issues of such DC superhero titles as Adventure Comics (featuring Supergirl and Zatanna), The Flash, and Superman, while continuing to write anthological mysteries, along with well-received stories for all but one issue of the semi-anthological occult title The Phantom Stranger #14-26 (Aug. 1971 - Sept. 1973). Superman and Batman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... For people who perform risky stunts as a profession, see stunt performer. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Adventure Comics was a comic book published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ... Zatanna is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed, nicknamed Created by Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert, the original Flash first appeared in Flash Comics #1 (1940). ... Superman, aka Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and for several decades has been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons of all-time. ... The word occult comes from Latin occultus (hidden), referring to the knowledge of the secret or knowledge of the hidden and often meaning knowledge of the supernatural, as opposed to knowledge of the visible or knowledge of the measurable, usually referred to as science. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics. ...


Wein and artist Bernie Wrightson created the horror character Swamp Thing in The House of Secrets #92 (July 1971). Over the next several decades, Swamp Thing would star in DC series and miniseries — including an initial 1972-96 series begun by Wein and Wrightson, and the mid-1980s Saga of the Swamp Thing, edited by Wein and featuring early work by writer Alan Moore — as well as two theatrical films, and a syndicated television series. He was responsible for writing what many have called the seminal version of Justice League of America (issues #100-118) with artist Dick Dillin. Wein also, with artist Carmine Infantino created and wrote The Human Target series of stories which appeared first in Action Comics, and later in Detective Comcis and The Brave and the Bold. Swamp Thing, created by Bernie Wrightson. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Alan Moore Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton, England) is a British writer most famous for his work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Film may refer to: photographic film a motion picture in academics, the study of motion pictures as an art form a thin skin or membrane, or any covering or coating, whether transparent or opaque a thin layer of liquid, either on a solid or liquid surface or free-standing Film... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Richard Allen Dick Dillin (b. ... Carmine Infantino (born May 24, 1925, Brooklyn, New York City) is an American comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. ... The Human Target is an American comic book character created by Len Wein and Carmine Infantino: a unique private detective and bodyguard named Christopher Chance who operates by impersonating his clients in order to eliminate threats to his principal, hence the idea of becoming a Human Target. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ...


In the early 1970s, Len began writing for Marvel Comics. He succeeded Roy Thomas as editor-in-chief of the color-comics line in 1974, staying a little over a year before handing the reins to Wolfman. Remaining at Marvel as a writer, Wein had lengthy runs on The Amazing Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, The Mighty Thor and Fantastic Four. In 1975, he and artist Dave Cockrum revived the Stan Lee / Jack Kirby mutant-superhero team the X-Men after a half-decade's hiatus, reformatting the membership. Among the characters the duo created were Nightcrawler, Storm, and Colossus; Wein had additionally created Wolverine earlier, with artists John Romita Sr. and Herb Trimpe, in The Incredible Hulk. Wein plotted the next two X-Men stories with artist Cockrum. These issues were then scripted by Chris Claremont, who subsequently developed the series into what became, with Spider-Man, one of Marvel's leading franchises. It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ... Cover by Steve Ditko for The Amazing Spider-Man #10 (Volume 1), March 1964. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a Marvel Comics superhero, based on the thunder god of Norse mythology. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... The cover of Giant-Size X-Men #1 by Gil Kane & Cockrum, featuring characters he (Cockrum) designed. ... Stan Lee and his most famous creation, Spider-Man. ... The Fantastic Four, one of Kirbys most famous co-creations. ... // Marvel Comics In Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men franchise, a mutant is a human being who is born with genetic modifications that allow for abilities not possessed by regular humans. ... Superman and Batman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Nightcrawler (Kurt Wagner) is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe and a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... Colossus (Piotr Peter Nikolaievitch Rasputin) is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe and a member of the X-Men. ... Wolverine (a. ... John Romita, Sr. ... Herb Trimpe (1939- ) is an American comic book artist and occasional writer, best remembered for his work on The Incredible Hulk and credited with the co-creation of X-Mens Wolverine in the early 1970s. ... Chris Claremont. ...


Return to DC

At the end of the 1970s, following a dispute with Marvel management, Wein returned to DC as a writer and then eventually an editor. He scripted a long run of Batman and collaborated on Green Lantern with artists Dave Gibbons and Mark Farmer. He also dialogued the mini-series Legends over the plots of John Ostrander and the artwork of John Byrne and Karl Kesel. As editor, he worked on such successful series as The New Teen Titans, Crisis on Infinite Earths, All-Star Squadron, and Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons's acclaimed and highly influential Watchmen miniseries. The DC Comics superhero Batman (originally and still sometimes referred to as the Batman or the Bat-Man) is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. ... Screenshot of Beneath a Steel Sky, backgrounds courtesy of Dave Gibbons. ... Mark Farmer is a British comic book artist. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... John Ostrander is an American writer of comics. ... John Byrne John Lindley Byrne (born July 6, 1950, Walsall) is a British-born naturalised American author and artist of comic books. ... A writer and inker whose works have primarily been under contract for DC Comics. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a twelve-issue comic book limited series (or maxiseries) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The All-Star Squadron, featuring Doctor Mid-Nite, Star-Spangled Kid, Robotman, Uncle Sam, Phantom Lady, Commander Steel, Plastic Man, Starman, Sandman, Green Lantern, Atom, Flash, Liberty Belle, Hourman and Amazing-Man The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981–1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by... Screenshot of Beneath a Steel Sky, backgrounds courtesy of Dave Gibbons. ... Watchmen is a twelve-issue comic book written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons. ... A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ...


Wein later wrote a Blue Beetle revival, and scripted a revamped Wonder Woman over penciller George Perez's plots, and created Gunfire, a new relatively shortlived superhero with artist Steve Erwin. Three fictional superheroes have used the name Blue Beetle as of 2005. ... Wonder Woman is a DC Comics superhero. ... In the collaborative method of producing a comic book used to create the majority of the comics published by major US publishers, the penciller (or penciler) is the artist who interprets the story created by the writer as comics pages drawn in pencil. ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Steve Irwin Stephen Robert Steve Irwin (born February 22, 1962 in Essendon, Victoria, Australia) is the owner and manager of Australia Zoo at Beerwah, Queensland, Australia. ...


Later career

Following his second stint at DC, Wein began writing and story editing for such animated television series as X-Men, Batman, Spider-Man, Reboot and War Planets: Shadow Raiders. In 2001, he and Wolfman wrote the screenplay "Gene Pool" for the production company Helkon, and later adapted it for a one-shot comic book for IDW Comics. He has recently begun writing comic-book stories for Bongo Comics' TV-series tie-in The Simpsons, and in 2006, collaborated with writer Kurt Busiek and artist Kelley Jones on the four-issue mini-series Conan: The Book of Thoth for Dark Horse Comics. In September 2004, Wein completed a script for a Swamp Thing feature for Silver Pictures at Warner Bros. In 2005 and 2006, Wein appeared frequently as a panelist on the Los Angeles theatre version of the TV game show What's My Line. An animated television series or cartoon television series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Examples of comic book titles published by Bongo Comics Bongo Comics is a comic book publishing company founded in 1993 by Steve and Cindy Vance, Bill Morrison, and Simpsons creator Matt Groening. ... The Simpsons is the longest-running American animated television series and overall sitcom, with 17 seasons and 367 episodes since it debuted on December 17, 1989 on FOX. The TV series, created by Matt Groening, is a spinoff of a series of animated shorts originally aired on The Tracey Ullman... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is an American comic book writer. ... Silver Pictures is a movie production company founded by Hollywood producer Joel Silver In 1987. ... The WB Shield, used from 2001 to late 2003. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Whats My Line? was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. ...


His first wife was Glynis Oliver, a comics colorist who spent years on the X-Men titles. His second wife is M.C. Valada, a photographer and entertainment attorney. Glyins Oliver is a colorist who has worked in the comics industry. ... A colorist is an artist who colors comic art reading it for production as a comic book. ... This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ...


Wein won the Shazam Award for Best Writer (Dramatic) in 1972, for Swamp Thing, and another that year for Best Individual Story (Dramatic), for "Dark Genesis" in Swamp Thing #1 (with Berni Wrightson). He was nominated in the same categories the following year. He also won the 1982 Comics Buyers Guide Award as Best Editor and was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award given by the Horror Writers of America for his graphic Vertigo one-shot, The Dreaming: Trial and Error. The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... Berni Wrightson, born on October 27, 1948 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, is an American artist. ...


References

  • The Grand Comics Database
Preceded by:
Roy Thomas
Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief
1974–1975
Succeeded by:
Marv Wolfman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Len Wein - definition of Len Wein in Encyclopedia (538 words)
That Wein had a strong hand—with artist Dave Cockrum and Thomas—in creating such characters as Nightcrawler, Storm, Colossus and Wolverine (who had made his debut in Wein's run on Hulk) has never been in doubt.
In the late 1970s Wein moved back to DC, principally as an editor, although he also scripted some excellent Batman stories and collaborated on a fine Green Lantern run (with artists Dave Gibbons and Mark Farmer).
During the 1980s, Wein commisssioned an update of the Charlton Comics library of characters from writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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