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Encyclopedia > Leith
The Water of Leith looking upriver from the docks, with the old buildings along Leith Shore including The King's Wark and The Old Ship Hotel and King's Landing.

Formerly a municipal burgh,[1] Leith is a former town in North Edinburgh at the mouth of the Water of Leith and is the port of Edinburgh, Scotland. It lies on the south shore of the Firth of Forth, in the unitary local authority of City of Edinburgh. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Water of Leith, above the Dean Village, running through a wooded gorge beneath the New Town. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... , Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... The Water of Leith, above the Dean Village, running through a wooded gorge beneath the New Town. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... , Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English (de facto)1; Gaelic[1]2 and Scots3 (recognised minority... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea... City of Edinburgh (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Èideann in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ...

Contents

History

Historically Leith and Edinburgh were separate burghs, but growth over the centuries means that Leith and Edinburgh now form a contiguous urban area. Leith was merged with Edinburgh in 1920 following an unofficial referendum in which the people of Leith voted five to one against the merger. A burgh (pronounced burruh) is the Scots language equivalent of the English language borough. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


Leith has a long and prominent role in Scottish history. As the major port access to Edinburgh, Leith has served as the staging point for many of Scottish history's significant events. Mary Queen of Scots' mother - Mary of Guise - ruled Scotland from Leith, as Regent for her daughter in 1560. At that time the Scottish Court was situated in Leith. The Regency ended in disaster with French Catholic troops being ousted by Scottish forces aided by English Protestant troops. The following year Mary Queen of Scots arrived in Leith to begin her ill-fated six year reign. Mary I of Scotland; known as Mary, Queen of Scots Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart or Stewart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was the ruler of Scotland from December 14, 1542 – July 24, 1567. ... Marie de Guise Marie de Guise (in English, Mary of Guise) (November 22, 1515 – June 11, 1560) was the Queen Consort of James V of Scotland and the mother of Mary, Queen of Scots. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ...


About a century later, Leith was both a battleground and ultimately headquarters for Oliver Cromwell forces. An archway of the old Leith Citadel stands as the only remnant of extensive Cromwellian fortifications forced upon Leith following the move north of a roundhead army. Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England, Scotland and Ireland into a republican Commonwealth and for the brutal war exercised in his conquest of Ireland. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ...


The remains of the battlefield are now a park called the Leith Links and the grassy mounds mark former cannon emplacement earthworks. This was also where the earliest record of golf was found; it was the subject of a ban by King James II in 1457 as it interfered with the more useful sport of archery. The links are the site of an early five hole golf course built in the 18th century. Leith bolsters its claim to being "the home of golf" because the official rules of golf, initially formulated at Leith in 1744 by the Honorable Company of Edinburgh Golfers, were later adopted by St Andrews. James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... This article is about the sport. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews is one of the oldest golf clubs in the world. ...


During the American war of independence John Paul Jones, a Scotsman who is credited as founder of the US Navy, led a flotilla of three former French vessels against Leith. The heavily armed warships were, reputedly, repulsed by appalling weather. Leith built fortifications after this event to prevent any repeat threat to the port and to Edinburgh. Part of Leith is still known as "The Fort" to this day, although all of the 18th century buildings, save a gatehouse, are long since gone. John Paul Jones (July 6, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ...


Leith was the port of entry for the visit of King George IV to Scotland, and The Old Ship Hotel and King's Landing was then given its new name to mark the King's arrival by ship's boat at Leith Shore for this event which popularised symbols of Scottish national identity. Sir David Wilkies flattering portrait of the kilted King George IV, with lighting chosen to tone down the brightness of his kilt and his knees shown bare, without the pink tights he wore at the event. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


The docks at Leith underwent severe decline in the post-Second World War period, with the area gaining a reputation for roughness and prostitution. In recent years Leith has undergone significant regeneration and is now a busy port with visits from cruise liners and the home of the Royal Yacht Britannia, Ocean Terminal, and administrative headquarters of the Scottish Executive. The council and government's 'Leith Project' provided a further economic boost. The shore area of Leith, once seedy, is now a centre for a range of new pubs and restaurants in charming surroundings. A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Britannia HM Yacht Britannia was the 83rd Royal Yacht since the restoration of King Charles II in 1660 (Charles II himself had 25 Royal Yachts, while five were simultaneously in service in 1831). ... Ocean Terminal in Edinburgh, Scotland is a shopping centre, designed by Terence Conran. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ...

Image File history File links LeithBananaFlats. ... Image File history File links LeithBananaFlats. ... The famous Leith Banana Flats Cables Wynd House, better known as the Leith Banana Flats[1][2] or as the banana block[3] because of its curved shape, is a multistorey public housing block in Leith, Edinburgh. ...

The new face of Leith

After decades of industrial decline, slum clearance and resultant depopulation in the post-war era, Leith gradually began to enjoy an upturn in fortunes in the late 1980s. Several old industrial sites were developed with modest, affordable housing, while small industrial business units were constructed at Swanfield, Bonnington, Seafield and off Lindsay Road. The Shore developed a clutch of upmarket restaurants, including the first of the groundbreaking chain of Malmaison hotels in a conversion of the former Seamans Mission, while the once industrially-polluted and desolate banks of the Water of Leith were cleaned up and a public walkway opened. A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... It has been suggested that Pollutant be merged into this article or section. ... The Water of Leith, above the Dean Village, running through a wooded gorge beneath the New Town. ...


Leith's gradual revival was greatly accelerated, however, by the decision of the Scottish Office (now the Scottish Executive) to purchase the disused Old East and Old West Docks, which were filled-in as a low-cost site for one of its civil service offices in the mid 1990s. The influx of well-paid civil service jobs boosted local commerce and fostered Leith's growing reputation as a white-collar, small business location. Further large-scale service and tourist development followed, including the Ocean Terminal complex and the permanently moored Royal Yacht Britannia. Categories: Stub | Scotland | Departments of the United Kingdom Government ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... The Byzantine civil service in action. ... White-collar workers perform tasks which are less laborious yet often more highly paid than blue-collar workers, who do manual work. ... Ocean Terminal in Edinburgh, Scotland is a shopping centre, designed by Terence Conran. ... Britannia HM Yacht Britannia was the 83rd Royal Yacht since the restoration of King Charles II in 1660 (Charles II himself had 25 Royal Yachts, while five were simultaneously in service in 1831). ...


In 2004 the owner of the Docks, Forth Ports, announced plans to close the port and carry out a major redevelopment of the area.[2] The planned development, which was given supplementary planning guidance by the City of Edinburgh Council in 2004, will be the size of a small town with up to 17,000 new homes. [3] It will include developments on the infilled Western harbour as well as residential, leisure, retail and commercial development across the rest of the old docks. The urban design of the project will keep it in context with the older developments in Leith and provide a wealth of public and private open space, including two large parks and a number of pedestrian linkages across the docks. The whole project is expected to be completed by about 2020. The plans have not been entirely well received, with concerns being expressed that the scheme does not give enough importance to affordable housing, and that it will only exacerbate the income disparity that already exists in Leith.[citation needed] Forth Ports plc is one of the largest port operators in the United Kingdom. ... City of Edinburgh (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Èideann in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Affordable housing is a dwelling where the total housing costs are affordable to those living in that housing unit. ... Income disparity is an inequality in pay or salary for equal labor. ...


Famous people from Leith

Paolozzis Newton, bronze (1995) in the courtyard of the British Library. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Chris Small (born 26 September 1973) is a Scottish professional snooker player. ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... John Hunter, Naval pioneer and colonial governor Captain John Hunter (1737– to 1821) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator who succeeded Arthur Phillip as the second governor of New South Wales, Australia from 1795 to 1800. ... the flag of the Governor of New South Wales The Governor of New South Wales is the representative in the Australian state of New South Wales of Australias head of state, Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... For the botanist (1832 - 1908), see Robert Jameson at Gerbera. ... Sir John Gladstone, 1st Baronet (11 December 1764 – 7 December 1851), was a Scottish merchant, Member of Parliament, and the father of the British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... Irvine Welsh (born Leith, Edinburgh, September 27, 1958) is an acclaimed contemporary Scottish novelist, most famous for his novel Trainspotting. ... Trainspotting is the first novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Tiny Dancer is a 1971 song by Elton John with lyrics by Bernie Taupin, which appears on Johns fifth album, Madman Across the Water. ... Dick Gaughan is a Scottish singer-songwriter. ... Adam Archibald was a Scottish First World War recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Victoria Cross (VC) is a military decoration awarded for valour in the face of the enemy to members of armed forces of some Commonwealth countries and previous British Empire territories. ... Craig and Charlie Reid, as pictured on The Proclaimers album Hit the Highway For the footballers, see Craig Reid (footballer). ... The Proclaimers are a Irish band composed of identical twins Charlie and Craig Reid. ...

Notable streets in Leith

Constitution Street | Great Junction Street | Leith Walk | Timber Bush | The Shore This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Etymology Bush is the corrupt form of Bourse, meaning a stock exchange History Timber Bush was originally the open piazza in the lower storey of an ancient building adjoining Queen Street Chapel in Leith, where the merchants and traders met for business - the Bourse, or exchange. ...


Other points of interest

Leith was home to the shipbuilder Henry Robb, which closed in 1983. Henry Robb, Limited, known colloquially as Robbs, was a British shipbuilding company based in Leith Docks on the east coast of Scotland. ...


Leith commonly takes as its home team Hibernian, who play at Easter Road Stadium: Easter Road actually straddles the old council boundary between Edinburgh and Leith, the north end being in Leith, the south and the postal address for the club being in Edinburgh. Hibernian Football Club (informally known as Hibs) are a Scottish professional football club based in Leith, north Edinburgh. ... Easter Road is the football ground of Hibernian Football Club in Leith, Edinburgh, and has a capacity of 17,500 making it the largest football stadium in Edinburgh. ...


The Proclaimers had a hit with "Sunshine on Leith". They are supporters of Hibernian Football Club and the song is regularly played before home matches. The Proclaimers are a Irish band composed of identical twins Charlie and Craig Reid. ... Hibernian Football Club is one of two main Edinburgh football clubs (the other being Heart of Midlothian). ...


Irvine Welsh was born in Leith and several of his books, including his debut novel Trainspotting and its sequel Porno, are partly set there. Irvine Welsh (born Leith, Edinburgh, September 27, 1958) is an acclaimed contemporary Scottish novelist, most famous for his novel Trainspotting. ... Trainspotting is the first novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. ... Porno is a novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh, and is the sequel to Trainspotting. ...


Grand Theft Auto computer game developers Rockstar North are based on Leith Street, the road (continued as Leith Walk) to Leith from central Edinburgh. Prior to this, the company was based within Leith itself - in an office building situated next to Leith Links park. The park itself is honoured in the fourth Grand Theft Auto game, Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, where the local country club is called Leaf Links. Grand Theft Auto (GTA) is a video game series created and primarily developed by Scottish developer Rockstar North (formerly DMA Design), published by Rockstar Games and debuted in 1998. ... Rockstar North Limited (formerly DMA Design Limited) is a Scottish developer of computer and video games founded by David Jones in Dundee and presently located in Leith Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. ... , Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (released in October 2002) is the fourth video game in the hit Grand Theft Auto series. ...


As of June 2007 Leith has been [unofficially] twinned with Rio De Janeiro[4] to promote the Leith Festival, a local rival to The Edinburgh Fringe. Location of Rio de Janeiro Coordinates: Country Brazil Region Southeast State Rio de Janeiro Government  - Mayor Cesar Maia (PFL) Area  - City 1,260 km²  (486. ... A street performer on the Royal Mile, with volunteer (2004). ...


References

  1. ^ The Story of Leith XXXIII. How Leith was Governed
  2. ^ End of the line for Leith port
  3. ^ Leith set for major development
  4. ^ Is Leith the new Rio?

External links

Coordinates: 55°58′41.20″N, 3°10′06.09″W Edinburgh is divided into areas that generally encompass a park (or green), a high street (i. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Leith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1308 words)
Leith is a town at the mouth of the Water of Leith and is the port of Edinburgh, Scotland.
Leith bolsters its claim to being "the home of golf" because the official rules of golf, initially formulated at Leith in 1744 by the Honorable Company of Edinburgh Golfers, were later adopted by St Andrews.
Leith was the port of entry for the visit of King George IV to Scotland, and The Old Ship Hotel and King's Landing was then given its new name to mark the King's arrival by ship's boat at Leith Shore for this event which popularised symbols of Scottish national identity.
The Story of Leith - XXXIII. How Leith was Governed (2416 words)
The Leith people complained bitterly of a large portion of the town being unprovided with any local magistracy, and of the fact that, where there were bailies, the government of each was separate from and independent of the others.
When Leith at last obtained its own Town Council, the right of electing the councillors lay with such of the citizens of Leith as were qualified to vote for a member of Parliament, the town being divided into wards for the purposes of the election.
From the Reformation down to the beginning of the nineteenth century the kirk session of South Leith was the education authority of the town, maintaining two schools—a grammar school for higher education and a school for the poor where the children were taught to read the Scriptures.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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