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Encyclopedia > Leinster House
Leinster HouseThe former palace of the Duke of Leinster. Since 1922, it has been the seat of both houses of the Irish parliament.
Leinster House
The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. Since 1922, it has been the seat of both houses of the Irish parliament.

Leinster House is the former ducal palace in Dublin that has served since 1922 as the parliament building of the Irish Free State and the Republic of Ireland. It served as the headquarters of the Royal Dublin Society until 1922. The society's famous Dublin Spring Show and Dublin Horse Show were held on its Leinster Lawn, facing Merrion Square. image of Leinster House. ... image of Leinster House. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Portugal, Spain and France (in Italy... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath), is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin Region. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) was (1922–1937) the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties which were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British... The Royal Dublin Society (RDS) was founded in 1731. ... Merrion Square is situated on the south side of Dublin city centre and is considered one of the citys finest examples of Georgian squares. ...


Ireland's parliament over the centuries had met in a number of locations, most notably in College Green, next to Trinity College Dublin. Its medieval parliament consisted of two Houses, a House of Commons and a House of Lords. Ireland's senior peer, the Earl of Kildare, had a seat in the Lords. Like all the aristocrats of the period, for the duration of the Social Season and parliamentary sessions, he and his family resided in state in a Dublin residence. (For the rest of the year, they used a number of country residences, notably Carton House in County Kildare.) College Green, previously called Hoggen Green, is a three sided square in the centre of Dublin. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... The Irish House of Commons by Francis Wheatley (1780). ... The former House of Lords chamber in the Irish Parliament Building, today in use as a function room by the Bank of Ireland. ... The Irish Social Season was a period or aristocratic entertainment and social functions that stretched from January to St. ... Carton House is one of Irelands greatest stately homes and one time ancestral seat of the Earls of Kildare and Dukes of Leinster. ...


From the late eighteenth century Leinster House (then called Kildare House) was the Earl's official Dublin residence. When it was first built in 1745-8, it was located on the unfashionable and isolated south side of the city, far from the main locations of aristocratic residences, namely Rutland (now Parnell) Square and Mountjoy Square. The Earl predicted that others would follow; in succeeding decades Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square became the primary location of residences of the aristocracy, with many of their northside residences being sold. (They ended up as slums.) In the history of aristocratic residences in Dublin, no other mansion matched Kildare House for its sheer size or status. When the Earl was made the first Duke of Leinster, the family's Dublin residence was renamed Leinster House. Its first and second floors - what Americans call second and third floors - were used as the floor model for the White House by its Irish architect, while the house itself was used as a model for the original stone-cut White House exterior. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Merrion Square is situated on the south side of Dublin city centre and is considered one of the citys finest examples of Georgian squares. ... Arms of the Duke of Leinster The Duke of Leinster (named after Leinster and, unlike the Province, pronounced Linster) is Irelands premier peer. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ...

Leinster House in 1911, decorated for the visit of King George V.The statue of Queen Victoria in the courtyard was removed in 1947.
Leinster House in 1911, decorated for the visit of King George V.
The statue of Queen Victoria in the courtyard was removed in 1947.

One famous member of the family who occasionally resided in Leinster House was Lord Edward FitzGerald, who became involved with Irish nationalism during the 1798 Rebellion, which cost him his life. With the passage of the Act of Union in 1800, Ireland ceased to have its own parliament. Without a House of Lords to attend, increasing numbers of aristocrats stopped coming to Dublin, selling off their Dublin residences, in many case to buy residences in London, where the new united parliament met. The Duke of Leinster sold Leinster House to the Royal Dublin Society. At the end of the nineteenth century, two new wings were added, to house the National Library of Ireland and the National Museum of Ireland. Image File history File links 1911 image of Leinster House, decorated for the visit of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Image File history File links 1911 image of Leinster House, decorated for the visit of King George V and Queen Mary. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert Windsor, formerly Wettin until 1917) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the House of Windsor in 1917. ... The Lord Edward FitzGerald (15 October 1763 - 4 June 1798) was an Irish aristocrat and revolutionary. ... The Irish Rebellion of 1798 or 1798 rebellion as it is known locally, was an uprising in 1798, lasting several months, against the British establishment in Ireland. ... The 1800 Act of Union merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... The Royal Dublin Society (RDS) was founded in 1731. ... National Library of Ireland is a national library located in Dublin, Ireland. ... The National Museum of Ireland (NMI) is the main museum in Ireland. ...


The Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 provided for the creation of a self-governing Irish dominion, to be called the Irish Free State. As plans were made to bring the new state into being, the Provisional Government under W.T. Cosgrave sought a temporary venue for the meetings of the new Chamber of Deputies Dáil Éireann and Senate Seanad Éireann. Plans were made to turn the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham, an eighteenth century former soldiers' home in extensive parklands, into a full-time Parliament House. However as it was still under the control of the British Army, who had yet to withdraw from it, and the new Governor-General of the Irish Free State was due to deliver the Speech from the Throne opening parliament within weeks, it was decided to hire the main RDS Lecture Theatre attached to Leinster House for use in December 1922 as a temporary Dáil chamber. Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of association between Ireland and the British Empire, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the (extra-judicial) Irish Republic which concluded the Anglo-Irish War. ... A Dominion is a wholly self-governing or virtually self-governing state of the British Empire or British Commonwealth, particularly one which reached that stage of constitutional development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries such as Canada and New Zealand. ... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) was (1922–1937) the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties which were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ... The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Seanad Chamber The Seanad meets in the former picture gallery in Leinster House. ... The Royal Hospital, Kilmainham in Kilmainham, Dublin is one of the finest 17th-century building in Ireland. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Governor-General (Irish: Seanascal) was the representative of the King in the 1922–1937 Irish Free State. ...

Leinster House in 1824.
Leinster House in 1824.

In 1924, due to financial constraints, plans to turn the Royal Hospital into a parliament house were abandoned; Leinster House instead was bought, pending the provision of a proper parliament house at some stage in the future. A new Senate or Seanad (pronounced 'shan-eth') chamber was created in Duke's old ballroom, while wings from the neighbouring Royal College of Science were taken over as used as Government Buildings. The entire Royal College of Science, which by then had been merged with University College Dublin, was subsequently taken over in 1990 and turned into a state of the art Government Buildings. Both the National Library and National Museum wings next to Leinster House remain used by as a library and museum and are not attached to the parliamentary complex. While plans were often made to provide a brand new parliament house (sites considered included the Phoenix Park and the Custom House), parliament has remained permanently located in Leinster House. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2992x2104, 1764 KB) Summary The Seat of His Grace the Duke of Leinster, named Carton, in the County of Kildare, from an engraving of the year 1824. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2992x2104, 1764 KB) Summary The Seat of His Grace the Duke of Leinster, named Carton, in the County of Kildare, from an engraving of the year 1824. ... Irish Government Buildings is a large edwardian building, centred on a quadrangle, in which some of the key offices in Irish government located. ... University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin - more commonly University College Dublin (UCD) - is Irelands largest university, with over 20,000 students. ... The Wellington Monument in Phoenix Park Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located to the north west of Dublin city centre, Ireland. ... The Custom House is a palladian 18th century building in Dublin, Ireland which houses the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government. ...


Since then, a number of extensions have been added, most recently in 2000, to provide adequate office space for 166 TDs, 60 senators, members of the press and other staff. Among the world leaders who have visited Leinster House to address joint sessions of the Oireachtas are US Presidents John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke and French President François Mitterrand. A TD or Teachta Dála (Irish for Dáil Deputy, pronounced chock-ta dawla) is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower chamber of the Irish Oireachtas (pronounced orr-och-tas) or National Parliament. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe, III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... Robert James Lee Hawke (born 9 December 1929), Australian trade union leader and politician, was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia. ... â–¶(?) (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) was a French politician. ...


A number of monuments stand, or have stood, around Leinster House. Its Kildare Street frontage used to be dominated by a large statue of Queen Victoria, first unveiled by King Edward VII in 1904. The statue was removed in 1947 and was re-erected in the 1990s in Sydney, Australia. Facing its garden front on its Merrion Square side, stands a large triangular monument commemorating three founding figures of Irish independence, President of Dáil Éireann Arthur Griffith, who died in 1922, Michael Collins and Kevin O'Higgins, the Chairman of the Provisional Government and the Vice-President of the Executive Council (deputy prime minister), both of whom were assassinated, in 1922 and 1927 respectively. Another statue commemorates the Prince Consort, Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, who held his major Irish Exhibition on Leinster Lawn in the 1850s. Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877 until her death. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Sydney is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian state of New South Wales, as well as Australias largest and oldest city (founded in 1788). ... The head of government under the Dáil Constitution adopted by the First Dáil of the Irish Republic in January 1919. ... Arthur Griffith (Árt Ó Gríofa in Irish) (March 31, 1871 – August 12, 1922) was the founder and first leader of Sinn Féin. ... Michael Collins (Irish name Micheál Ó Coileáin; October 16, 1890 – August 22, 1922), an Irish revolutionary leader, served as Minister for Finance in the Irish Republic, as Director of Intelligence for the IRA, as a member of the Irish delegation during the Anglo-Irish Treaty negotiations, as Chairman of... Kevin Christopher OHiggins ( 7 June 1892- 10 July 1927), Irish politician. ...


External link

  • Leinster House Website
Irish parliament houses
1600s-present
Leinster House

Chichester House 1600s–early 1700s Saint Patrick saltire | Blue Coat School early 1700s–1729 Saint Patrick saltire | Parliament House, College Green 1729–1800 Saint Patrick saltire | Mansion House 1919, 1922 Irish tricolour | UCD (Earlsfort Terrace) 1919–1922 Irish tricolour | Royal College of Science 1921 LL flag | Stormont 1932–1972; 1999–present Ni flag | Leinster House 1922–present Irish tricolour image of Leinster House. ... self drawn File links The following pages link to this file: Irish Potato Famine (1845-1849) Union Jack Ireland Great Irish Famine (1740-1741) Flag of Ireland Irish potato famine (legacy) British Home Championship Irish Famine (1879) Categories: GFDL images ... self drawn File links The following pages link to this file: Irish Potato Famine (1845-1849) Union Jack Ireland Great Irish Famine (1740-1741) Flag of Ireland Irish potato famine (legacy) British Home Championship Irish Famine (1879) Categories: GFDL images ... The Irish House of Commons entrance The original entrance to the building, facing onto College Green. ... self drawn File links The following pages link to this file: Irish Potato Famine (1845-1849) Union Jack Ireland Great Irish Famine (1740-1741) Flag of Ireland Irish potato famine (legacy) British Home Championship Irish Famine (1879) Categories: GFDL images ... The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin and has been since 1715. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... The Royal College of Science for Ireland was created as a result of a decision of HM Treasury in 1865 to merge a number of science-orientated education bodies including the Museum of Irish Industry and Government School of Science applied to Mining and the Arts. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Ministers and Secretaries Act Categories: Flag images ... The Parliament Building of Northern Ireland, known as Stormont because of its location in the Stormont area of Belfast, served as the seat of the Parliament of Northern Ireland and successive Northern Ireland assemblies and conventions. ... Image File history File links Northern_Ireland_flag. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ...

Historic Irish Houses and Castles Dublin Castle

Áras an Uachtaráin | Allenstown House | Ardbraccan House | Blarney Castle | Carton House | Castletown House | Chichester House | Deerfield | Dublin Castle | Durhamstown Castle | Emo Court | Farmleigh | Iveagh House | Kilkenny Castle | Leinster House | Lismore Castle | Malahide Castle | Mansion House | Mornington House | Powerscourt House | Slane Castle | Trim Castle | Tyrone House dublin castle tower File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Áras an Uachtaráin (formerly the Viceregal Lodge) is the official residence of the President of Ireland, located in the Phoenix Park on the Northside of Dublin1. ... Allenstown House was a large 5-bay, 4 storey Georgian mansion in County Meath, Ireland. ... Ardbraccan House (known sometimes historically as Ardbraccan Palace) is a large Palladian county house in County Meath in the Republic of Ireland. ... View from the top of the castle of the surrounding grounds Kissing the Blarney Stone See Also Blarney Stone of Eloquence External Links Official Blarney Castle Website Categories: Ireland geography stubs | Europe buildings and structures stubs | Castles in Ireland ... Carton House is one of Irelands greatest stately homes and one time ancestral seat of the Earls of Kildare and Dukes of Leinster. ... Castletown House, Irelands finest Palladian country house, is an imposing building built in 1722 for William Connolly, the Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. ... Deerfield is the name of some places in the United States of America: Deerfield, Illinois Deerfield, Kansas Deerfield, Massachusetts Deerfield, Michigan Deerfield, Missouri Deerfield, New Hampshire Deerfield, New York Deerfield, Wisconsin, village in Dane County Deerfield (town), Wisconsin, town in Dane County Deerfield (town), Wisconsin, town in Waushara County Deerfield... [[the building to the right. ... 1885 Map showing the location of Durhamstown Castle Durhamstown Castle is a 500 year old towerhouse in County Meath in Ireland. ... Farmleigh was formerly one of the Dublin residences of the Guinness brewing family. ... Categories: Ireland-place stubs | Castles in Ireland ... Lismore Castle is a castle in County Waterford in the Republic of Ireland. ... Malahide Castle lies close to the village of Malahide 9 miles north of Dublin in Ireland. ... The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin and has been since 1715. ... Mornington House was the Dublin social season georgian residence of the Earls of Mornington. ... Irish Palladianism. ... Slane Castle is a castle located in Slane, Ireland. ... Norman Keep, Trim Castle - before renovation Trim Castle, Trim, Ireland has an area of 30,000 m², it is the remains of the largest castle in Europe, which was Norman in origin, built primarily by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter de Lacy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Leinster House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (903 words)
The former palace of the Duke of Leinster.
Leinster House is the former ducal palace in Dublin that has served since 1922 as the parliament building of the Irish Free State and the Republic of Ireland.
Leinster House in 1911, decorated for the visit of King George V.
A Guide to Leinster House, and Tour of the Parliament (1126 words)
On becoming the Duke of Leinster in 1776 (Dublin and Kildare are in the province of Leinster) the house was renamed Leinster House.
In 1815, Augustus Frederick, the third Duke of Leinster, sold the mansion to the Royal Dublin Society (RDS) for £10,000 and a yearly rent of £600 which was later redeemed.
Today, Leinster House is the seat of the two Houses of the Oireachtas (National Parliament), comprising Dáil Éireann (the House of Representatives) and Seanad Éireann (the Senate).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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