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Encyclopedia > Leiden University

Leiden University
Universiteit Leiden

Latin: Academia Lugduno Batava

Motto Praesidium Libertatis (Bastion of Freedom)
Established 1575
Type Public
Rector Paul van der Heijden
Faculty 3,244
Students 17,251
Location Leiden, the Netherlands
Nobel Laureates Heike Kamerlingh Onnes,
Hendrik Lorentz,
Pieter Zeeman,
Willem Einthoven
Website http://www.leiden.edu

Leiden University, located in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands[1]. It is a member of the Coimbra Group, the Europaeum and the League of European Research Universities. The university was founded in 1575 by Prince William of Orange, leader of the Dutch revolt in the Eighty Years' War. The royal House of Orange and Leiden University still have a close relationship. The Queens Wilhelmina, Juliana and Beatrix and crown-prince Willem-Alexander studied at Leiden University. In 2005 Queen Beatrix received a rare honorary degree from Leiden University.[2] Seal of the University of Leiden in Leiden, The Netherlands. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Leyden redirects here. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (September 21, 1853 – February 21, 1926) was a Dutch physicist. ... Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (July 18, 1853, Arnhem – February 4, 1928, Haarlem) was a Dutch physicist who shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics with Pieter Zeeman for the discovery and elucidation of the Zeeman effect. ... Pieter Zeeman (May 25, 1865 – October 9, 1943) (pronounced zāmän) was a physicist who shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics with Hendrik Lorentz for his discovery of the Zeeman effect. ... Willem Einthoven Willem Einthoven (May 21, 1860 – September 29, 1927) was a Dutch doctor and physiologist. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... Leyden redirects here. ... Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... William I (William the Silent) William I of Orange-Nassau (April 24, 1533 – July 10, 1584), also widely known as William the Silent [Dutch: Willem de Zwijger], was born in the House of Nassau, and became Prince of Orange in 1544. ... Combatants Dutch rebels Spanish Empire The Eighty Years War, or Dutch Revolt (1568[1]–1648), was the revolt of the Seventeen Provinces in the Netherlands against the Spanish (Habsburg) Empire. ... The Principality of Orange The title originally referred to the sovereign principality of Orange in southern France, which was a property of the House of Orange (from 1702 Orange-Nassau). ... For other uses, see Wilhelmina (disambiguation). ... Juliana Queen of the Netherlands Queen Juliana of the Netherlands (Juliana Emma Louise Wilhelmina van Oranje-Nassau) (April 30, 1909 – March 20, 2004), Princess of Orange-Nassau, Duchess of Mecklenburg, Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld, was Queen of the Netherlands from her mothers abdication in 1948 to her own abdication... Beatrix, Queen of the Netherlands (born January 31, 1938 as Beatrix Wilhelmina Armgard, Prinses der Nederlanden, Prinses van Oranje-Nassau, Prinses van Lippe-Biesterfeld) has been the queen regnant of the Kingdom of the Netherlands since April 30, 1980. ... His Royal Highness Crown Prince Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands, (Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand), Prince of Orange, Prince of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau, Jonkheer of Amsberg (born April 27, 1967), is the Crown Prince of the Netherlands and styled HRH the Prince of Orange. ... Beatrix, Queen of the Netherlands (born January 31, 1938 as Beatrix Wilhelmina Armgard, Prinses der Nederlanden, Prinses van Oranje-Nassau, Prinses van Lippe-Biesterfeld) has been the queen regnant of the Kingdom of the Netherlands since April 30, 1980. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ...


Today, Leiden University has nine faculties, over 50 departments and more than 150 (under)graduate programs, and it enjoys an international reputation [3]. It houses more than 40 national and international (research) institutes.

Contents

The institution

The university has no central campus; its buildings are spread over the city. Some buildings like the Gravensteen (which currently houses the Leiden International Office) are very old, while buildings like Lipsius and Gorlaeus are much more modern. The university is divided into nine major faculties which offer approximately 50 undergraduate degree programs and over 100 graduate programs. In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ...

Faculties
Theology Website
Law Website
Medicine Website
Mathematics and Natural Sciences Website
Arts Website
Social and Behavioural sciences Website
Philosophy Website
Archaeology Website
Creative and Performing Arts Website

The Faculty of Creative and Performing Arts is a cooperation between Leiden University and the Royal Conservatoire and Royal Academy of Art. The university has never had a faculty of economics, business or management, since all these decades one thought this would not fit into its tradition. Yet, in 2002 The Leiden School of Management (LUSM) [4] was founded, offering six professional MBA programs. These programs were shut down in 2006, however, and the LUSM is developing other business management activities more closely related to the activities of the faculties. Currently they have a cooperation with the faculty of Mathematics with the MSc in ICT in Business.[5] At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Theology at: The School of Theology Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Behavioural sciences (or Behavioral science) is a term that encompasses all the disciplines that explore the activities of and interactions among organisms in the natural world. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from Greek: αρχαίος, archae, ancient; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... “M.S.” redirects here. ...


History

In 1575, the emerging Dutch Republic did not have any universities in its northern heartland. The only other university in the Netherlands was in southern Louvain, firmly under Spanish control. The scientific renaissance had begun to highlight the importance of academic study, so Prince William founded the first Dutch university in Leiden as a reward for the heroic defence of Leiden against Spanish attacks in the previous year. Ironically, the name of Philip II of Spain, William's adversary, appears on the official foundation certificate, as he was still the de jure count of Holland. It is traditionally said that the citizens of Leiden were offered the choice between a university and a certain exemption from taxes, and that the citizens believed that a tax law could be rescinded, whereas the great universities of Europe had survived for many centuries. Originally located in the convent of St Barbara, the university moved to the convent of the White Nuns in 1581, a site which it still occupies, though the original building was destroyed in 1616. Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ... Leuven   (French Louvain, German Löwen) is the capital of the province of Flemish Brabant in Flanders, Belgium, European Union. ... William I (William the Silent) William I of Orange-Nassau (April 24, 1533 – July 10, 1584), also widely known as William the Silent [Dutch: Willem de Zwijger], was born in the House of Nassau, and became Prince of Orange in 1544. ... Philip II (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, King of England (as King-consort of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, King... The Counts of Holland ruled over the county of Holland in the Low Countries between the 10th and the 16th century. ... A tax is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (for example, tribes, secessionist movements or revolutionary movements). ... Events January 16 - English Parliament outlaws Roman Catholicism April 4 - Francis Drake completes a circumnavigation of the world and is knighted by Elizabeth I. July 26 - The Northern Netherlands proclaim their independence from Spain in the Oath of Abjuration. ... Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The presence within half a century of the date of its foundation of such scholars as Justus Lipsius, Joseph Scaliger, Franciscus Gomarus, Hugo Grotius, Jacobus Arminius, Daniel Heinsius and Gerhard Johann Vossius, at once raised Leiden university to the highest European fame, a position which the learning and reputation of Jacobus Gronovius, Herman Boerhaave, Tiberius Hemsterhuis and David Ruhnken, among others, enabled it to maintain down to the end of the 18th century. Justus Lipsius, Joost Lips or Josse Lips (October 18, 1547 — March 23, 1606), was a Flemish philologian and humanist. ... Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609) was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Roques Lobejac. ... Franciscus Gomarus (born January 30, 1563 in Bruges, died 1641), was a Dutch theologian. ... Hugo Grotius Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; 10th April 1583 - 28th August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Jacobus Arminius Jacobus Arminius (aka Jacob Arminius, James Arminius, and his Dutch name Jacob Harmenszoon or Jakob Hermann) (1560–1609) was a Dutch heretical theologian and (until 1603) professor in theology at the University of Leiden. ... Daniel Heinsius (or Heins) ( June 9, 1580 - February 25, 1655), one of the most famous scholars of the Dutch Renaissance, was born at Ghent. ... Gerhard Johann Vossius. ... Jakob Gronovius (1645-1716) was a Germany classical scholar, the son of Johann Friedrich Gronovius. ... Herman Boerhaave (December 31, 1668 - September 23, 1738) was a Dutch humanist and physician of European fame. ... Tiberius Hemsterhuis (January 9, 1685 - April 7, 1766), Dutch philologist and critic, was born at Groningen in Holland. ... David Ruhnken ( 1723- 1798) was a scholar, one of the most illustrious in the history of the Netherlands. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


At the end of the nineteenth century, Leiden University again became one of Europe's leading universities. At the world’s first university low-temperature laboratory, professor Heike Kamerlingh Onnes achieved temperatures of only one degree above absolute zero of -273 degrees Celsius. In 1908 he was also the first to succeed in liquifying helium and can be credited with the discovery of the superconductivity in metals. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (September 21, 1853 – February 21, 1926) was a Dutch physicist. ...


Kamerlingh Onnes was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1913. Three other professors received the Nobel Prize for their research performed at Universiteit Leiden: Hendrik Antoon Lorentz and Pieter Zeeman received the Nobel Prize for their pioneering work in the field of optical and electronic phenomena, and the physiologist Willem Einthoven for his invention of the string galvanometer, which among other things, enabled the development of electrocardiography. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (September 21, 1853 – February 21, 1926) was a Dutch physicist. ... Nobel Prize medal. ... Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (July 18, 1853, Arnhem – February 4, 1928, Haarlem) was a Dutch physicist and the winner of the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on electromagnetic radiation. ... Pieter Zeeman (May 25, 1865 – October 9, 1943) (pronounced zāmän) was a physicist who shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics with Hendrik Lorentz for his discovery of the Zeeman effect. ... Nobel Prize medal. ... Willem Einthoven Willem Einthoven (May 21, 1860 – September 29, 1927) was a Dutch doctor and physiologist. ...


These Nobel prize winners, but also the physicists Albert Einstein and Paul Ehrenfest, the Arabist and Islam expert Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje, the law expert Cornelis van Vollenhoven and historian Johan Huizinga, were among those who pushed the university into a place of international prominence during the 1920s and 1930s. In 2005 the manuscript of Einstein on the quantum theory of the monatomic ideal gas (the Einstein-Bose condensation) was discovered in one of Leiden's libraries.[6] Albert Einstein ( ) (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass-energy equivalence, . He was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the... Paul Ehrenfest Paul Ehrenfest (Vienna, January 18, 1880 – Amsterdam, September 25, 1933) was an Austrian physicist and mathematician, who obtained Dutch citizenship on March 24, 1922. ... Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857-1936). ... Cornelis van Vollenhoven, Dordrecht May 8, 1874 - Leiden, April 29 1933. ... Johan Huizinga (b. ... Albert Einstein ( ) (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass-energy equivalence, . He was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the... A Bose-Einstein condensate is a gaseous superfluid phase formed by atoms cooled to temperatures very near to absolute zero. ...


At present, Leiden has a firmly established international position among the top research institutes in many fields, including the natural sciences, medicine, social and behavioural sciences, law, arts and letters. Of the twenty-eight Spinoza awards (the highest scientific award of The Netherlands), seven were granted to professors of the Universiteit Leiden. Literary historian Frits van Oostrom was the first professor of Leiden to be granted the Spinoza award for his work on developing the NLCM centre (Dutch literature and culture in the Middle Ages) into a top research centre. Other Spinoza award winners are linguist Frits Kortlandt, mathematician Hendrik Lenstra and Carlo Beenakker, who works in the field of mesoscopic physics. Among other leading professors are Ewine van Dishoeck, professor of astronomy at Leiden Observatory, professor of transplantation biology Els Goulmy, Frits Rosendaal, professor of clinical epidemiology, Wim Blockmans, professor of Medieval History, and Willem Adelaar, professor of Amerindian Languages. Baruch Spinoza Benedictus de Spinoza (November 24, 1632 - February 21, 1677), named Baruch Spinoza by his synagogue elders and known as Bento de Spinoza or Bento dEspiñoza in the community in which he grew up. ... Frits van Oostrom (1953-), born in Utrecht, The Netherlands, is University Professor for the Humanities at the Utrecht University. ... Hendrik Willem Lenstra, Jr. ... Carlo W. J. Beenakker (June 9, 1960) is a professor at Leiden University and leader of the universitys mesoscopic physics group, which was established in 1992. ... Ewine van Dishoeck (1955) is Professor of Molecular Astrophysics and the director of the Raymond & Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics at the Leiden University. ... The Leiden Observatory (Sterrewacht Leiden) is an optical observatory in the city of Leiden in the Netherlands. ... Els Goulmy (1946) is professor of transplantation biology, especially regarding minor histocompatibility antigen, at Leiden University. ... Wim Blockmans, born in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1945. ... Amerindian languages are the native languages of the Americas. ...


The portraits of many famous professors since the earliest days hang in the university aula, one of the most memorable places, as Niebuhr called it, in the history of science. The University Library, which has more than 3.5 million books and fifty thousand journals, also has a number of special collections of western and oriental manuscripts, printed books, archives, maps, and atlases. Scholars from all over the world visit Leiden University Library. The research activities of the Scaliger Institute concentrate on the various aspects of the transmission of knowledge and ideas through texts and images from antiquity to the present day. The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Carsten Niebuhr Carsten Niebuhr (March 17, 1733 - April 26, 1815) was a German traveller. ... University Library Leiden in 1610 from Woudanus in Stedeboeck der Nederlanden, Amsterdam: Willem Blaeu, 1649. ... University Library Leiden in 1610 from Woudanus in Stedeboeck der Nederlanden, Amsterdam: Willem Blaeu, 1649. ... University Library Leiden in 1610 from Woudanus in Stedeboeck der Nederlanden, Amsterdam: Willem Blaeu, 1649. ...


Among the institutions affiliated with the university are The KITLV or Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (founded in 1851), the observatory 1633; the natural history museum, with a very complete anatomical cabinet; the museum of antiquities (Museum van Oudheden), with specially valuable Egyptian and Indian departments; a museum of Dutch antiquities from the earliest times; and three ethnographical museums, of which the nucleus was P. F. von Siebold's Japanese collections. The anatomical and pathological laboratories of the university are modern, and the museums of geology and mineralogy have been restored. The KITLV or Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies at Leiden was founded in 1851. ... The Leiden Observatory (Sterrewacht Leiden) is an optical observatory in the city of Leiden in the Netherlands. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Pathology (from Greek pathos, feeling, pain, suffering; and logos, study of; see also -ology) is the study of the processes underlying disease and other forms of illness, harmful abnormality, or dysfunction. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mineralogy is an earth science that involves the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals. ...


The Hortus Botanicus (botanical garden) is the oldest botanical garden in the Netherlands. Plants from all over the world have been carefully cultivated here by experts for more than four centuries. The Clusius garden (a reconstruction), the 18th century Orangery with its monumental tub plants, the rare collection of historical trees hundreds of years old, the Japanese Von Siebold Memorial Garden symbolising the historical link between East and West, the tropical greenhouses with their world class plant collections, and the central square and Conservatory exhibiting exotic plants from South Africa and southern Europe. The Hortus Botanicus of Leiden is the oldest botanical garden of the Netherlands, and one of the oldest in the world. ...


Research at Leiden is well developed. There are many university research institutes and Leiden participates in over forty nation-wide research schools, twelve of which being located in the heart of Leiden.


Education

Undergraduate programs:

Most of the university's departments offer their own degree program(s). Undergraduate programs lead to either a B.A., B.Sc. or LL.B. degree. Other degrees, such as the B.Eng. or B.F.A., are not awarded at Leiden University. A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... Bachelor of Engineering (BAI (in latin), BEng, or BE) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded to a student after three, four or five years of studying engineering at an accredited university in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, China and India. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ...

  • African Languages and Cultures[7]
  • Archeology
  • Arabic, Persian and Turkish Languages and Cultures [8]
  • Art History
  • Assyriology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology[9]
  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences[10]
  • Chemistry
  • Chinese Languages and Cultures[11]
  • Classics
  • Comparative Indo-European Linguistics
  • Computer Science
  • Criminology
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Developmental Sociology
  • Dutch Language and Literature
  • Dutch Studies
  • Educational Sciences
  • Egyptian Languages and Cultures (Egyptology)[12]
  • English Language and Culture[13]
  • French Language and Culture[14]
  • German Language and Culture[15]
  • History[16]
  • Hebrew and Aramaic Languages and Cultures[17]
  • Indian American Studies[18]
  • Indology (South and central Asia)[19]
  • Indonesian Languages and Cultures[20]
  • Italian Language and Culture[21]
  • Japanese Languages and Cultures[22]
  • Korean Languages and Cultures[23]
  • Latin American Studies (Spanish Languages and Cultures)[24]
  • Law (General Dutch Law track)
  • Linguistics
  • Life Science and Technology
  • Literature
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine (6-year track)
  • Molecular Science and Technology
  • Near Eastern Studies
  • New Persian Languages and Cultures (Turkish)[25]
  • Notarial Law
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Psychology
  • Russian Studies
  • Slavic Languages and Literatures
  • Southeast Asia and Oceania Languages and Cultures
  • Tax Law
  • Theology
  • World Religion Studies

Graduate Studies:

Students can choose from a range of graduate programs. Most of the above mentioned undergraduate programs can be continued with either a general or a specialised graduate program. Leiden University offers more than 100 graduate programs leading to either M.A., M.Sc., M.Phil., or LL.M. degree. The M.Phil. is a special research degree and only awarded by selected departments of the university (mostly in the fields of Arts, Social Sciences, Archeology, Philosophy, and Theology). Admission to these programs are highly selective and primarily aiming at those students opting for an academic career. A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... In the usage of the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, New Zealand and some other countries, the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ...


Some of the notable graduate programs are

  • Air and Space Law
  • Bioinformatics
  • DNA computing
  • Drug Delivery Technology and Biopharmaceutics
  • East Asian Studies
  • European Law
  • European Business Law
  • European Union Studies
  • Evolutionary and Ecological Sciences
  • Functional Genomics
  • History
  • ICT in Business
  • International Public Law
  • International Relations and Diplomacy
  • Islamic Studies
  • Life Science and Technology
  • Linguistics
  • Media Technology[26]
  • Nanoscience
  • Philosophy of a Specific Discipline
  • Toxicology

Doctorate programs:

In addition, most departments, affiliated (research)institutes or faculties offer doctorate programs or positions, leading to the Ph.D degree. Most of the Ph.D. programs offered by the university are concentrated in several research schools or institutes. Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...


Research schools and affiliated institutes

Leiden University has more than 50 research and graduate schools and institutes. Some of them are fully affiliated with one faculty of the university, while others are interfaculty institutes or even interuniversity institutes. Most of the scholars working in the Netherlands are associated with one of these schools or institutes.

Institute
ASC Research Centre for African Studies
CNWS Research School of Asian, African, and American Studies
CTI Center for Language and Identity
E.M. Meijers Institute Research School for Legal Studies
Grotius Centre Research Centre for International Legal Studies
GSS Leiden Graduate School of Science
Historical Institute Research Institute of History
Huizinga Instituut Research Institute and Graduate School of Cultural History
IBL Research Institute for Biology
IIAS International Institute for Asian Studies
IOPS Interuniversity Graduate School Psychometrics and Sociometrics
ISED Institute for the Study of Educational and Human Development
LACDR The Leiden Amsterdam Center for Drug Research
LCMBS Leiden Centre for Molecular BioScience
LGSAS Leiden Graduate School for Archeology
LIACS Institute of Advanced Computer Science
LIBC Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition
LIC Leiden Insitute of Chemistry
LION Leiden Institute of Physics
LISOR Leiden Institute for the Study of Religion
LUCL Leiden University Centre for Linguistics
LUMI Leiden University Mathematical Institute
Mediëvistiek Netherlands Research School for Medieval Studies
NIG Netherlands Institute of Government
NOVA Netherlands Research School for Astronomy
N.W. Posthumus Instituut Netherlands Research Institute and School for Economic and Social History
OIKOS National Graduate School in Classical Studies
Onderzoekschool Kunstgeschiedenis Dutch Postgraduate School for Art History
OSL Netherlands Graduate School for Literary Studies
PALLAS Research Institute of Art History and Literatures of the Western World
Polybios Graduate School for Political Science and International Affairs
Sterrewacht Leiden Leiden Astronomical Observatory
The Europe Institute Research Institute for Legal Studies in the Field of European Integration
Van Vollenhoven Institute Research Institute for Law, Governance and Development

Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10 April 1583 – Rostock, 28 August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Johan Huizinga (b. ... The Leiden Observatory (Sterrewacht Leiden) is an optical observatory in the city of Leiden in the Netherlands. ...

Alumni and other people associated with the Leiden University

Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd, in Arabic: , (born October 7, 1943) is an Egyptian Quranic scientist and one of the leading liberal theologists in Islam. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali ( ; Somali: ; born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969[2] in Mogadishu, Somalia) is a Dutch feminist and political writer, daughter of the Somali scholar, politician, and revolutionary opposition leader Hirsi Magan Isse. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... Bernhard Siegfried Albinus (originally Weiss) (February 24, 1697 - September 9, 1770) was a German anatomist. ... Jacobus Arminius Jacobus Arminius (aka Jacob Arminius, James Arminius, and his Dutch name Jacob Harmenszoon or Jakob Hermann) (1560–1609) was a Dutch heretical theologian and (until 1603) professor in theology at the University of Leiden. ... Beatrix, Queen of the Netherlands (born January 31, 1938 as Beatrix Wilhelmina Armgard, Prinses der Nederlanden, Prinses van Oranje-Nassau, Prinses van Lippe-Biesterfeld) has been the queen regnant of the Kingdom of the Netherlands since April 30, 1980. ... Herman Boerhaave (December 31, 1668 - September 23, 1738) was a Dutch humanist and physician of European fame. ... Bart Jan Bok (Hoorn, April 28, 1906 – Tucson, August 5, 1983) was a Dutch-American astronomer. ... Frits Bolkestein Frederik Bolkestein (born 4 April 1933 in Amsterdam; usually known as  ) is a Dutch politician and former EU Commissioner. ... Gerardus Johannes Petrus Josephus Bolland (9 June 1854-11 February 1922), also known as G.J.P.J. Bolland, was a Dutch autodidact (self-taught man), linguist, philosopher, biblical scholar, and lecturer. ... Alexander Boswell (1706-1782), lord of Auchinleck, was a judge of the supreme courts of Scotland. ... John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute (May 25, 1713 - March 10, 1792), was a Scottish nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain (1762-1763) under George III. A close relative of the Campbell clan (his mother was a daughter of the First Duke of Argyll), Bute succeeded to... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, PC, FRS (November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded... Charles de LEcluse or Carolus Clusius (Arras, February 19, 1525 - Leiden April 4, 1609) was the Flemish doctor and pioneering botanist, perhaps the most influential of all 16th century scientific horticulturists. ... Norbert de Jonge (born 13 May 1978) is a Dutch pedophile activist and advocate of the GNU philosophy in the Netherlands. ... René Descartes (French IPA: ) (March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Renatus Cartesius (latinized form), was a highly influential French philosopher, mathematician, scientist, and writer. ... Edsger Dijkstra Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (Rotterdam, May 11, 1930 – Nuenen, August 6, 2002; IPA: ) was a Dutch computer scientist. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Paul Ehrenfest Paul Ehrenfest (Vienna, January 18, 1880 – Amsterdam, September 25, 1933) was an Austrian physicist and mathematician, who obtained Dutch citizenship on March 24, 1922. ... Willem Einthoven Willem Einthoven (May 21, 1860 – September 29, 1927) was a Dutch doctor and physiologist. ... Albert Einstein ( ) (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who is best known for his theory of relativity and specifically mass-energy equivalence, . He was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the... Thomas Girdlestone MD (born Holt, Norfolk, 1758, died 25 June 1822) was an English physician and writer. ... Michiel Jan de Goeje (1836—1909), Dutch orientalist, was born in Friesland in 1836. ... Franciscus Gomarus (born January 30, 1563 in Bruges, died 1641), was a Dutch theologian. ... Jakob Gronovius (1645-1716) was a Germany classical scholar, the son of Johann Friedrich Gronovius. ... Hugo Grotius Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; 10th April 1583 - 28th August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Mohammad Hatta Mohammad Hatta (born August 12, 1902, Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia); died March 14, 1980, Jakarta) was Indonesias first vice president, after being the countrys Prime Minister. ... Prof. ... Sutan Sjahrir (5 March 1909 — 9 April 1966) was the first prime minister of Indonesia, after a career as a key Indonesian nationalist organizer in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono IX was born in Sompilan, Ngasem, Yogyakarta in 12 April 1912. ... Dr. Theodoor Gautier Thomas Pigeaud (Leipzig, 20 February 1899 – Gouda, 6 March 1988) was an expert in Javanese Literature from the Netherlands. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... David Hartley (1731 - December 19, 1813) was a member of the House of Commons (1774–80, 1782–84), an inventor, and the son of the philosopher David Hartley. ... Daniel Heinsius (or Heins) ( June 9, 1580 - February 25, 1655), one of the most famous scholars of the Dutch Renaissance, was born at Ghent. ... Tiberius Hemsterhuis (January 9, 1685 - April 7, 1766), Dutch philologist and critic, was born at Groningen in Holland. ... Johan Huizinga (b. ... Juliana Queen of the Netherlands Queen Juliana of the Netherlands (Juliana Emma Louise Wilhelmina van Oranje-Nassau) (April 30, 1909 – March 20, 2004), Princess of Orange-Nassau, Duchess of Mecklenburg, Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld, was Queen of the Netherlands from her mothers abdication in 1948 to her own abdication... Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (September 21, 1853 – February 21, 1926) was a Dutch physicist. ... Johan Hendrik Caspar Kern (April 6, 1833–July 7, 1917) was a Dutch linguist. ... Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall, Lord Fountainhall, 2nd Baronet, was baptised 2 August 1646 and died 20 September 1722, both at Edinburgh, the eldest son by his second marriage of Sir John Lauder, 1st Baronet, whom he succeeded after much acrimony. ... Justus Lipsius, Joost Lips or Josse Lips (October 18, 1547 — March 23, 1606), was a Flemish philologian and humanist. ... Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (July 18, 1853, Arnhem – February 4, 1928, Haarlem) was a Dutch physicist and the winner of the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on electromagnetic radiation. ... Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA pronunciation: //) (born July 18, 1918) was the first President of South Africa to be elected in fully-representative democratic elections. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... 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Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609) was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Roques Lobejac. ... Jaap de Hoop Scheffer (right) and Jan Peter Balkenende Jaap de Hoop Scheffer (left) and Colin Powell Jaap de Hoop Scheffer (legally Jakob Gijsbert de Hoop Scheffer) (born April 3, 1948) is a Dutch politician who is the 11th NATO Secretary General. ... Willem de Sitter (May 6, 1872 – November 20, 1934) was a mathematician, physicist and astronomer. ... Willebrord Snel Willebrord Snel (1580–October 30, 1626), also known as Snel van Royen or Snellius, was a Dutch astronomer and mathematician, most famous for the law of refraction now known as Snells law. ... Prof. ... Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857-1936). ... Signing of the Mayflower Compact Myles Standish (c. ... Dirk Struik (September 30, 1894-October 21, 2000) was a mathematician and Marxian theoretician in the United States. ... Morris Tabaksblat, Rotterdam 1937, is a Dutch Captain of industry. He is mostly known as a former CEO of Unilever and chairman of the Tabaksblat committee that drafted the Tabaksblat code. Tabaksblat was educated at the gymnasium in The Hague and after that studied law at the Leiden University. ... Johan Rudolf Thorbecke (January 14, 1798 - June 4, 1872) was one of the most important Dutch politicians. ... Nikolaas Niko Tinbergen (April 15, 1907 – December 21, 1988) was a Dutch ethologist and ornithologist who shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Karl von Frisch and Konrad Lorenz for their discoveries concerning organization and elicitation of individual and social behaviour patterns in animals. ... Bram van der Stok Born on October 13, 1915 in Sumatra, Bram van der Stok, also referred to as Bob van der Stok, was the most decorated aviator in Dutch history, as well as one of the few to escape from the German POW camp Stalag Luft III. // Personal Life... 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See also

University Library Leiden in 1610 from Woudanus in Stedeboeck der Nederlanden, Amsterdam: Willem Blaeu, 1649. ... Leiden University Medical Centre is the university hospital and medical faculty of Leiden University in the city of Leiden. ...

References

  1. ^ Technically the University of Leuven, currently in Belgium but in the year of its foundation (1425) located in the Netherlands, is the oldest university ever founded in the Netherlands, but Leuven is no longer part of the Netherlands.
  2. ^ Windows Media file of Queen Beatrix receiving degree, February 2005
  3. ^ http://ed.sjtu.edu.cn/rank/2005/ARWU2005_TopEuro.htm
  4. ^ http://www.lusm.leidenuniv.nl/
  5. ^ http://www.iib.leidenuniv.nl/
  6. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4170212.stm
  7. ^ http://www.tca.leidenuniv.nl/
  8. ^ http://www.tcmo.leidenuniv.nl/
  9. ^ http://bio.leidenuniv.nl/
  10. ^ http://bfw.leidenuniv.nl/
  11. ^ http://www.tcc.leidenuniv.nl/
  12. ^ http://www.tcmo.leidenuniv.nl/egyptologie/
  13. ^ http://www.engels.leidenuniv.nl/
  14. ^ http://www.frans.leidenuniv.nl/
  15. ^ http://www.duits.leidenuniv.nl/
  16. ^ http://www.history.leidenuniv.nl/
  17. ^ http://www.tcmo.leidenuniv.nl/hebreeuws-en-aramees/
  18. ^ http://www.tcia.leidenuniv.nl/
  19. ^ http://www.tczca.leidenuniv.nl/
  20. ^ http://www.indonesisch.leidenuniv.nl/
  21. ^ http://www.italiaans.leidenuniv.nl/
  22. ^ http://www.japans.leidenuniv.nl/
  23. ^ http://www.koreaans.leidenuniv.nl/
  24. ^ http://www.tcla.leidenuniv.nl/
  25. ^ http://www.tcmo.leidenuniv.nl/nieuw-perzisch/
  26. ^ http://mediatechnology.liacs.nl/

The Catholic University of Leuven, founded in 1425, is now the names of two Belgian universities, after the original university split in 1968: the Dutch-speaking Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, and the French-speaking Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a...

External links

  • Homepage of Leiden University (in English)
  • Homepage of Leiden University (in Dutch)
  • English Graduate Programs

  Results from FactBites:
 
Leiden University (442 words)
Life in Leiden is greatly influenced by the relatively large number of students, as most of them both live and study in the historic town of Leiden, which has a total of 118,000 inhabitants.
Moreover, since Leiden is a small town, all the university buildings -which are scattered throughout town- are within walking or cycling distance.
Leiden University (1575) is the oldest university in the Netherlands and has an enrolment of over 16,000 students.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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