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Encyclopedia > Legolas
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Legolas
Other names Greenleaf (Legolas in English)
Titles Legolas of Mirkwood
Lord of the Elves of Ithilien
Race Elves
Culture Sinda, Silvan Elves of Mirkwood
Book(s) The Fellowship of the Ring
The Two Towers
The Return of the King

Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. He is an Elf from Mirkwood and one of nine members of the Fellowship of the Ring. “Tolkien” redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the fictional Sindar (meaning Grey People, singular Sinda, although the latter term was not generally used by Tolkien) are Elves of Telerin descent. ... In popular tradition and mythology, silvans (alternatively sylvans) are creatures or people associated with trees. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... This article is about the novel. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ...

Contents

Appearances

Literature

Legolas [LÉG-oh-lahs, IPA: ˈlɛgɔlas] was the son of Thranduil, King of the Woodland Realm of Northern Mirkwood, who appeared as "the Elvenking" in The Hobbit. Thranduil ruled over the Silvan Elves who dwelt in the wood. Although he lived among them, was exposed to their customs, and (it may be inferred) considered himself one of them, Legolas was strictly not one of the Silvan Elves (Wood-elves). His father Thranduil had originally come from Lindon; he and his son were actually Sindar, or "Grey Elves", called in the singular Sinda: "Sindarin" was their language. A small minority of Sindar ruled the predominantly Silvan Woodland Realm, and Thranduil headed them. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... King Thranduil was a character in the fictitious world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Mirkwood was a great wood east of the Misty Mountains in Rhovanion, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... This article is about the book. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the best known Silvan Elves are the Elves of northern Mirkwood and Lothlórien. ... For more general description of Wood Elves, see Wood-elves. ... Spoiler warning: In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Lindon is the land beyond the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains) in the northwest of Middle-earth. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the fictional Sindar (meaning Grey People, singular Sinda, although the latter term was not generally used by Tolkien) are Elves of Telerin descent. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


The realm's Sindarin minority, who should have been more noble and wise than the Silvan Elves, went "native" at the end of the First Age. After Melkor was defeated and all of the grand Elf-kingdoms of Beleriand were destroyed, the Sindar returned to "a simpler time" in their culture. The realm of Lothlórien was similar to the Woodland Realm in that a community of Silvan Elves was ruled by a small non-Silvan group, i.e. Galadriel and Celeborn. Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Beleriand was the region of northwestern Middle-earth during the First Age. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy book The Lord of the Rings, Celeborn (pronounced with a hard c as in cat) is the Elven husband of Galadriel; Lord of the Galadhrim; and co-ruler along with Galadriel of Lothlórien. ...


Legolas was introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring, at the council of Elrond of Rivendell, where he came as a messenger from his father to discuss the escape of Gollum from their guard. Legolas was chosen to be a member of the Fellowship that intended to destroy the One Ring. He accompanied the other members in their travels from Rivendell to Amon Hen. The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Amon Hen (Sindarin for Hill of the Eye) is the name of a fictional hill in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


When the Fellowship was trapped by a snowstorm while crossing Caradhras, Legolas scouted ahead to find the Sun, while Aragorn and Boromir drove a path through the snow. In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Caradhras, also called the Redhorn (the literal English translation of the Sindarin name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the Misty Mountains. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


After the attempt to cross Caradhras was foiled, Gandalf took the Fellowship on an underground journey through Moria, an ancient Dwarf-kingdom, though some (including Legolas) did not wish to travel there. Before they reached Moria, however, Legolas helped fend off an attack by Sauron's wolves in Hollin. Once in Moria, he helped fight off Orcs and recognised Durin's Bane as a Balrog of Morgoth. For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Ñoldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Durins Bane from Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ...


After Gandalf was lost while facing the Balrog, Aragorn took charge of the Fellowship and led the group to the Elven realm of Lothlórien, the Golden Wood. Legolas served as the initial spokesperson for the company, speaking with the inhabitants, the Galadhrim, whom he considered close kin. Wood-elves are Elves that live in forest or wood, often also called Silvan Elves. ...


Within the Fellowship, there was friction between Legolas and the Dwarf Gimli, because of the ancient quarrel between Elves and Dwarves after the destruction of Doriath in the First Age; and also because Thranduil once threw Gimli's father, Glóin, in prison (as described in The Hobbit). Legolas and Gimli became friends, however, when Gimli greeted the Elven queen Galadriel with gentle words. Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Doriath was the land of the Sindar. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... Glóin is the name of two fictional characters of J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ...


The Fellowship took leave of Lothlórien after receiving several gifts. Legolas was given a new longbow from the Galadhrim, along with the other gifts that Galadriel and Celeborn gave him and the rest of the Fellowship, such as Elven cloaks and lembas. Legolas later received a warning from Galadriel (through Gandalf, who had returned from death): Lemonwood, purpleheart and hickory longbow, 45 lbf draw force. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy book The Lord of the Rings, Celeborn (pronounced with a hard c as in cat) is the Elven husband of Galadriel; Lord of the Galadhrim; and co-ruler along with Galadriel of Lothlórien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world, Middle-earth, lembas, also called waybread in the Common Speech, is a special food made by the Elves. ...

"Legolas Greenleaf long under tree
In joy thou hast lived. Beware of the Sea!
If thou hearest the cry of the gull on the shore,
Thy heart shall rest in the forest no more."[1]

While the Fellowship was travelling over the River Anduin, Legolas shot down a nearby fell beast with one shot. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Éowyn and the Nazgûl by Ted Nasmith In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, fell beast is the authors description of the flying carrion-eating pterosaur-like creatures on which the Nazgûl rode after being unhorsed at the Ford of Bruinen. ...


After Boromir was killed and Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took were captured by Orcs in The Two Towers, Legolas, Aragorn, and Gimli set forth in pursuit of the two hobbits. (Frodo Baggins, the Ring-bearer, and Samwise Gamgee, on the other hand, had left the group and gone ahead on the road to Mordor). Legolas and his companions met the resurrected Gandalf and the Rohirrim, fought in the Battle of the Hornburg, and witnessed Saruman's downfall at Isengard, where they were reunited with Merry and Pippin. In the Battle of the Hornburg, Legolas and Gimli engaged in an Orc-slaying contest (Gimli won by one, killing forty-two to Legolas's forty-one, but the real result was stronger mutual respect). Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... “Frodo” redirects here. ... In The Lord of the Rings, by J. R. R. Tolkien, Frodo Baggins is appointed to be the Ring-bearer by the Council of Elrond in Rivendell. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ...


In The Return of the King, Legolas and Gimli accompanied Aragorn on the Paths of the Dead, along with the Grey Company. After Aragorn summoned the Dead Men of Dunharrow to fight for him, Legolas saw them frighten away the Corsairs of Umbar from their ships at Pelargir. Galadriel's prophecy was fulfilled: as Legolas heard the cries of seagulls, he began to experience the Sea-longing — the desire to sail west to Valinor, the Blessed Realm, which was latent among the Sindar. He fought in the Battles of the Pelennor Fields and the Morannon and watched as Sauron was defeated and Barad-dûr collapsed. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Paths of the Dead was a haunted pass through the White Mountains. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... In the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Army of the Dead (also known as the Dead Men of Dunharrow) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains, who were cursed to remain in Middle-earth by Isildur after they abandoned their oath to aid him in... Dunharrow is a fictional place from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Corsairs of Umbar were a fleet of Men of Umbar in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, allied to Sauron in his war against Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Pelargir was a great harbour city in southern Gondor. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the fictional Sindar (meaning Grey People, singular Sinda, although the latter term was not generally used by Tolkien) are Elves of Telerin descent. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ...


After the destruction of the One Ring, Legolas remained in Minas Tirith for Aragorn's crowning and marriage to Arwen. Later, Legolas and Gimli went travelling together through Fangorn forest and to visit the Glittering Caves of Helm's Deep, as Legolas had promised Gimli. Eventually, Legolas arrived in Ithilien with some of his people and, with his father's leave, spent his remaining time in Middle-earth helping to restore the devastated forests of that war-ravaged land. He founded an Elf-colony in the fair forest of Ithilien in Gondor. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Spoiler warning: Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings, Helms Deep was a large valley in the north-western Ered Nimrais (White Mountains). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings, Helms Deep was a large valley in the north-western Ered Nimrais (White Mountains). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


It was told in the Red Book of Westmarch (first written by Bilbo Baggins, continued by Frodo Baggins and supposedly finished by Samwise Gamgee), that after Aragorn's death in Fourth Age one hundred and twenty, Legolas built a grey ship in Ithilien and left Middle-earth to go over the Sea to Valinor, and that Gimli the Dwarf went with him. Fictional book in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... “Frodo” redirects here. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ...


Adaptations

Legolas (Anthony Daniels) in the 1978 animated film.

Legolas was voiced by Anthony Daniels (who had played the droid C-3PO of Star Wars fame) in Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings. In the film, he takes Glorfindel's place in the "Flight to the Ford" sequence; he meets Strider and the hobbits on their way to Rivendell, and sets Frodo on his horse before he is chased by the Nazgûl to the ford of Bruinen. Here, he answers to Elrond and is not explicitly identified as a Wood-elf. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (853x480, 88 KB) // Legolas, as portrayed in The Lord of the Rings (1978). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (853x480, 88 KB) // Legolas, as portrayed in The Lord of the Rings (1978). ... Anthony Daniels with C-3POs head. ... Anthony Daniels with C-3POs head. ... Luke Skywalker in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope along side astromech droid R2-D2, and protocol droid C-3PO. This is the concept of the droid in science fiction. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... This article is about the series. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a Noldor who appears in the tales of Middle-earth. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Bruinen or Loudwater is a river which appears in The Hobbit as well as The Lord of the Rings. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Legolas was voiced by David Collings in the 1981 BBC Radio 4 adaptation. David Collings (born 4th January, 1940 in Brighton, East Sussex) is a British actor. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ...


In Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (20012003), Legolas was portrayed by Orlando Bloom. For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ...

He is presented as an unstoppable fighter, presumably from eons of practice; he performs jaw-dropping stunts in battle scenes in all three movies. For example, in the Uruk-hai attack on Amon Hen, he stabs one Uruk in the eye with an arrow, then shoots two more (the arrow going through the first Uruk and into another) with the same arrow. In the Battle of the Hornburg, he slides down a staircase on a shield, shooting arrows all the while, and as he reaches the bottom of the staircase he shoots the shield out from under him into an Uruk's neck, drives his arrow into another Uruk, pulls it out and shoots it at another. In the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, he takes down an Oliphaunt all by himself (to Gimli's surprise and displeasure). However, in the books Legolas' exploits in battle are not presented in great detail. Aside from shooting the fell beast, he undertakes no major actions other than to make peace with Gimli, overcoming their long-standing mutual racial animosity — he and Gimli are followers, rather than leaders. The film-makers later stated that the entire scene of Legolas killing the Oliphaunt was filmed during pick-ups (months after original filming) to insert a major action scene showcasing him, because at that point they realised that he simply does not get to do much in the third part of the trilogy, and also because of some positive response to the shield-staircase scene. Image File history File links Legolas2. ... Image File history File links Legolas2. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth, the Uruk-hai (Black Speech: Orc folk) were a new breed of Orcs that appeared during the Third Age. ... Amon Hen (Sindarin for Hill of the Eye) is the name of a fictional hill in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... Combatants Gondor, Rohan, Dúnedain of the North Mordor, Harad, Rhûn, Khand, Umbar Participants Gandalf, Éomer, Éowyn, Aragorn, Imrahil, Merry, Denethor†, Théoden† Witch-king of Angmar†, Nazgûl, Gothmog† War of the Ring 1st Fords of Isen - 2nd Fords of Isen - Isengard - Hornburg - Lothlórien - Mirkwood - Osgiliath - Pelennor... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional lands of Middle-earth, a mûmak (plural mûmakil) is a pachyderm of the southern land of Harad, similar to but much larger than todays elephant, and said to be its ancestor. ...


Due to technical mishaps involving Bloom's contact lenses, in the films Legolas's eye colour sometimes changes between brown, purple, and blue.


Legolas is absent from the 1980 animated version of The Return of the King. DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ...


Characteristics

Appearance

Tolkien first describes him in The Fellowship of the Ring as "a strange Elf, clad in green and brown".[2]


While the Fellowship attempted to cross Caradhras, Legolas alone remained "light of heart". He was little affected by the blowing winds and snow; he did not even wear boots, only light shoes, and his feet scarcely made imprints on the snow - illustrating the Elves' otherworldliness.[3]


Among Tolkien fans, Legolas' hair colour is a matter of dispute. In The Hobbit his father Thranduil was described as having "golden" hair, so many assume that Legolas must have been blond also (indeed, both Ralph Bakshi and Peter Jackson make him blond in their respective film adaptations). However, Tolkien describes his head as "dark" when he shoots down a Ringwraith's fell beast in The Fellowship of the Ring in the following quote, suggesting the contrary to some: This article is about the book. ... King Thranduil was a character in the fictitious world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Nazgûl (Black Speech: Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron in Middle-earth. ... Éowyn and the Nazgûl by Ted Nasmith In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, fell beast is the authors description of the flying carrion-eating pterosaur-like creatures on which the Nazgûl rode after being unhorsed at the Ford of Bruinen. ...

Frodo looked up at the Elf standing tall above him, as he gazed into the night, seeking a mark to shoot at. His head was dark, crowned with sharp white stars that glittered in the black pools of the sky behind.[4]

Some interpret this to mean that Legolas' hair must be either dark brown or black, as was the norm for the Sindar. (Blond hair was mostly exclusive to the Vanyar.) However, since the above takes place at night, his head may have appeared "dark" due to shadows or the darkness itself, rather than due to his actual hair colour. In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Vanyar are the fairest and most noble of the High Elves. ...


Age

Though neither Legolas' age nor his birthdate are directly given in Tolkien's writings, some passages in The Two Towers gives some hints about his age:

"[The forest] is old, very old," said the Elf. "So old that almost I feel young again, as I have not felt since I journeyed with you children. It is old and full of memory. I could have been happy here, if I had come in days of peace."[1]

"These are the strangest trees that I ever saw," [Legolas] said; "and I have seen many an oak grow from acorn to ruinous age. I wish that there were leisure now to walk among them: they have voices, and in time I might come to understand their thought."[1]

"Five hundred times have the red leaves fallen in Mirkwood my home since then," said Legolas, "and but a little while does that seem to us."[5]

Legolas is thus older than Gimli and Aragorn, who are 139 and 87 respectively at the time of the War of the Ring according to their birth-dates in the Appendices to The Lord of the Rings. Oak trees live several centuries, with 500 years not an unusual age. Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Merchandise related to the live-action film trilogy includes two non-canonical figures for the character's age. In one of the "official movie guides" for these films, a birthdate for Legolas is set to 87 of the Third Age. This would make him 2931 years old at the time of the War of the Ring. This date for Legolas' birth was made up by the movie writers, as in the books there are no known dates concerning Legolas before T.A. 3018. The figure of T.A. 2931, however, appears in the book as the year Aragorn was born; the writers may have picked the number at random from the Tale of Years (the timeline) in the Appendices. On the other hand, Top Trumps, a brand of playing cards, released a set of cards for The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, with the card for Legolas stating his age at 7000. This would make him older than Elrond, who is approximately 6520 when he leaves Middle-earth; however, this figure is also invented. ... This article discusses the concept of literary ‘canon’ as it might be applied to J. R. R. Tolkien’s fictional Middle-earth legendarium. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Though his father and his kingdom appear in The Hobbit, Legolas does not appear himself. Of course, his character had not been created yet (though his name had). However, since he is at least over 139 years old (since he is older than Gimli), he must have been alive during the events of The Hobbit, which take place less than a century before the Quest of Mount Doom. This article is about the book. ... Legolas is a main character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ...


Names and titles

The name Legolas is a Silvan dialect form of pure Silvan Laeca-lass, which means Greenleaf (thus, Greenleaf is not his surname, as is sometimes erroneously believed; nor is it an epithet, like Oakenshield, but a translation of his name). It consists of the Sindarin words laeg, green; and golas, a collection of leaves, foliage (being a prefixed collective form of las(s), leaf). The Book of Lost Tales, which mentions a different character of the same name, gives the early Quenya equivalent as Laiqualassë. However, since Quenya underwent much development since Tolkien first conceived the language, it might have well turned out different by the time of the publication of The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien does not give a "developed Quenya" version of the name. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the best known Silvan Elves are the Elves of northern Mirkwood and Lothlórien. ... In popular tradition and mythology, silvans (alternatively sylvans) are creatures or people associated with trees. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Thorin Oakenshield was a Dwarf, the son of Thráin II and the grandson of King Thrór. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Book of Lost Tales is the title of the first two volumes of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


There might, however, be a certain meaning to his name: laeg is a very rare, archaic word for green, which is normally replaced by calen (cf. Calenhad, mutated Parth Galen and plural Pinnath Gelin) and is otherwise almost only preserved in Laegrim, Laegel(d)rim (Sindarin form of Quenya Laiquendi), the Green Elves of the First Age. It may be that Thranduil named his son Legolas to at least in part refer to this people, who were remote kin and ancestors of the later Silvan Elves, the people Thranduil ruled and to whom — very likely — Thranduil's wife belonged. In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the fictional Nandor (singular Nando) were Elves of Telerin descent, who left the Great Journey from Cuivienen to Valinor as the Elves reached the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ...


The only peoples whom Tolkien uses surnames for are Hobbits and the Men of Bree. For other Men and Elves, Tolkien used the patronymic (son of) formula. In English, therefore, a fuller name would be "Legolas son of Thranduil" or "Legolas Thranduil's son". In Sindarin, that would be Legolas Thranduilion, -ion meaning "son of." The latter is used in the extended edition of Peter Jackson's film adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring; Haldir addresses Legolas as such when the Fellowship enters Lothlórien, seeking refuge. Look up patronymic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Haldir is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


Concept and creation

The name Legolas Greenleaf first appeared in The Fall of Gondolin, one of the "Lost Tales", circa 1917. The character is mentioned only once and is unrelated to the character discussed above. As the Lost Tales were the first embodiment of Tolkien's mythology, and by the time The Lord of the Rings was written much had changed, this in all likelihood is not the same elf, and he was not included in the published Silmarillion. In the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Fall of Gondolin is the name of one of the original Lost Tales which formed the basis for a section in his later work, The Silmarillion. ... The Book of Lost Tales is the title of the first two volumes of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher, with the assistance of fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ...

But the others, led by one Legolas Greenleaf of the house of the Tree, who knew all that plain by day or by dark, and was night-sighted, made much speed over the vale for all their weariness, and halted only after a great march.[6]

The Legolas of Gondolin, whom Tolkien would likely have renamed, has a different etymology. His name (Laiqalassë in its pure form) comes from the primitive Quenya (Qenya) words laica, green, and lassë, leaf. The names are very similar, but the characters were different: Legolas of Gondolin was possibly a Noldorin Exile, of the House (kindred) of the Tree. However, the published Silmarillion, in describing Turgon's founding of Gondolin, states that Turgon took with him up to a third of the people under Fingolfin, but an even larger number of the Sindar. Thus, whether Legolas of Gondolin was of Noldorin or Sindarin descent is debatable. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Gondolin is a hidden city of the Elves founded by Turgon in the First Age. ... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Two Towers. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The White Rider". ISBN 0-395-08254-4. 
  2. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Fellowship of the Ring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "Many Meetings". ISBN 0-395-08255-2. 
  3. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Fellowship of the Ring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Ring Goes South". ISBN 0-395-08255-2. 
  4. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Fellowship of the Ring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Great River". ISBN 0-395-08255-2. 
  5. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Two Towers. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The King of the Golden Hall". ISBN 0-395-08254-4. 
  6. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1984). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): The Book of Lost Tales II. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Fall of Gondolin". ISBN 0-395-36614-3. 

“Tolkien” redirects here. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Book of Lost Tales is the title of the first two volumes of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ...

External links

  • Legolas Greenleaf at the Encyclopedia of Arda
  • Legolas at The Thain's Book
  • Legolas of Mirkwood: Prince Among Equals - An essay by Ellen Brundige

  Results from FactBites:
 
Legolas - Free Encyclopedia (276 words)
Legolas is Prince of Mirkwood, the son of King Thranduil, descendants from the royal line of Sindarin elves.
The age of Legolas is not known, though it is thought that he is millennia old.
Within the Fellowship, Legolas and the dwarf Gimli clash, because of the sundering of the relationship between elves and dwarves after the destruction of Eregion, and also because Legolas's father Thranduil once imprisoned Gimli's father Gloin (as described in The Hobbit).
Legolas (260 words)
Tolkien's Middle-earth, Legolas is a Sylvan Elf who becomes a part of the Fellowship of the Ring.
Within the Fellowship, Legolas and the dwarf Gimli clash, because of the sundering of the relationship between elves and dwarves after the destruction of Eregion.
Eventually, Legolas comes to Ithilien with some of his people, with his father's leave, to live out his remaining time in Middle-earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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