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Encyclopedia > Legislative violence

Legislative violence broadly refers to any violent clashes between members of a nation's legislature. It is most popularly used as a reference for the violent clashes that occurred in the legislatures of Asian countries, particularly the Republic of China (Taiwan) and South Korea. A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Motto: None Anthem: National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital Taipei City (de facto) Nanjing (de jure)1 Largest city Taipei City Official language(s) Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Government Semi-presidential system  - President Chen Shui-bian  - Vice President Annette Lu  - Premier Su Tseng-chang Establishment Xinhai Revolution   - Declared October...

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Republic of China

The Republic of China (Taiwan) is widely known for the violence that occurs in its Legislative Yuan. It is popularly referred locally as "Legislator Group Brawl" (立委群毆). Legislative violence in Taiwan has, according to some, decreased in realism in recent years, and has been reduced to a political show used by legislators as a ploy to gain media coverage and votes amongst constituents. Violence refers to acts of aggression and abuse which causes or intends to cause criminal injury or harm to persons, and (to a lesser extent) animals and property. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ...


In 1995, the Legislative Yuan was presented the Ig Nobel Prize Peace Award, for "demonstrating that politicians gain more by punching, kicking and gouging each other than by waging war against other nations." 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ig Nobel Prizes are a parody of the Nobel Prizes and are given each year in early fall — around the time the recipients of the genuine Nobel Prizes are announced — for ten achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think. ...


Historical background

The history of legislative violence in the Yuan dates back to the 1980s. At this time, the Legislative Yuan still consisted mostly of legislators that were elected in the last Pan-Chinese legislative elections, which occurred in 1948. Under a ruling by the Judicial Yuan of the ROC, these legislators were allowed to remain in their seats until free elections can be held in Mainland China once it was recovered by the Kuomintang (which given the military balance with the Communists, seemed unlikely). The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive, informally sometimes including the years 1979, 1990 and 1991. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... The highlighted area in the map is what is commonly known as mainland China. Mainland China (Simplified Chinese: 中国大陆; Traditional Chinese: 中國大陸; pinyin: Zhōnggúo Dàlù; literally The Chinese Massive Landmass or Continental China) is an informal (disputed — see talk page) geographical term which is usually synonymous with the area... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ...


As new seats were created for Taiwan, the opposition dangwai began to form. However, the Kuomintang, which is the party that most of the legislators elected in 1948 affiliate with, still controls the agenda. This led to clashes between the two blocs in the Legislative Yuan. The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ...


Militarist faction vs. Democratic Progressive Party

In a period between 1990 and 1993, during the tenure of Premier Hau Pei-tsun, legislators allied with the militarist faction (軍系) (with which Hau is also allied with, as Minister of National Defense), along with legislators that belong to the "Order Team" (秩序組) frequently started incidents of legislative violence with the 12-member Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) opposition in the name of "defending the Ministry of National Defense". It created high tension in the Legislative Yuan, and even forced the President of the Yuan to expel all DPP members in one sitting. In one sitting of the Yuan, a DPP legislator was injured so badly, that he had to be sent to the hospital for treatment. This article is about the year. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... Hau Pei-tsun (郝柏村; pinyin: HÇŽo BócÅ«n; born July 13, 1919) was Premier of the Republic of China (on Taiwan) from May 30, 1990 to February 10, 1993 and a 4-star general in the ROC Army. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ...

Specific events

Legislator (later President) Chen Shui-bian attended a meeting of the National Defence Committee. During the committee meeting, Chen asked Minister of National Defence Hau Pei-tsun whether he intended to overthrow the president of the time, Lee Teng-hui, in the event of a political turmoil. Hau said it was not advisable for him to answer the question. Chen then followed up with another question, asking Hau which side he intends to stand on in the event of a political turmoil. At this time, the Chairman of the Committee, Chou Shu-fu said Chen's question was out of line, and Chen began to quarrel with Chou. Chou then called for a recess. March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in leap years). ... This article is about the year. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Hau Pei-tsun (郝柏村; pinyin: Hǎo Bócūn; born July 13, 1919) was Premier of the Republic of China (on Taiwan) from May 30, 1990 to February 10, 1993 and a 4-star general in the ROC Army. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: 李登輝; Simplified Chinese: 李登辉; Pinyin: Lǐ Dēnghuī) born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China (ROC). ...


The committee reconvened after the aforementioned recess to continue its discussions. Chen once again peppered Hau with questions over various items in the defense budget. Hau continued to evade the questions, with a promise that he will respond in writing afterwards. After a while, Chou ordered that all questions, from now on, will be replied in writing after the meeting is adjourned, and called for another legislator to ask questions.


At this time, Chen, expressing his disapproval, flipped his table over, with two of his fellow DPP legislators, Chang Chun-hsiung and Chao Jun-yiao following suit. Another KMT legislator, when he heard about the events happening in the Defense Committee meeting, rushed to the meeting room and began to throw chairs around, while saying "Goddamn it! If you guys have enough guts to throw stuff around, I will do that too!". Immediately afterwards, DPP legislator Lu Shou-yi also threw around chairs, and a big fight ensued. Chang Chun-hsiung (Chinese: 張俊雄; pinyin: Zhāng Jùnxióng) (born March 23, 1938) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


"The Black Terror"

A ruling of the Council of Grand Justice in 1991 expelled the elderly members elected in 1948, making the Legislative Yuan fully chosen by the Taiwanese electorate. In 1992, seats in the entire chamber were put up for election for the first time since 1948 and a large number of popularly-elected legislators entered the Legislative Yuan. Amongst these batches of new legislators were people who have connections with the Triads. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


At this time, the KMT controlled a faction called the "Order Team" (秩序組) in the Yuan. The team consisted of legislators that are well-trained in fighting, such as Lin Ming-ye, Zhao Jan-peng, and Shih Tai-seng.

Specific Events

A quarrel broke out between the DPP caucus and KMT legislator Lin Ming-ye. After Lin walked off the podium, DPP legislator So Wun-chi told him to be patient. But the way the phrase (卡忍耐, which roughly translates to "have a bit of patience") was pronounced led to a mistaken interpretation by Lin as a vulgar insult. As a result, Lin slammed his brick cell phone on So's head. May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The word motherfucker (also contracted forms mo-fucker, mofucka, mother, mofo, mafucka, mofy, mo-facku, mother moo and mamma-jamma) is a common insult, term of endearment, and expletive in the English language and is widely considered obscene. ... Motorola T2288 mobile phone A mobile phone is a portable electronic device which behaves as a normal telephone whilst being able to move over a wide area (compare cordless phone which acts as a telephone only within a limited range). ...

The Secretary-General of the DPP You Yi-yen was assaulted by three unknown assailants while he was heading towards the DPP headquarters. Investigations carried out by the DPP later accused legislator Luo Fu-juo. March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...

KMT legislator Zhen Ji-wei questioned the eligibility of certain people who registered to appear at a forum for the discussion of national affairs, and requested a re-registration to rectify the problem. In the process, Zhen held the registration book tightly. This was responded with a threat of biting by the New Party legislator Fu Kun-cheng. When Zhen refused to release the regislation book from her clutches, Fu, true to his words, bit Zhen. Zhen then kicked Fu in the kneecaps, in which Fu responded with another kick. Zhen was later sent to the hospital with bite injuries on the right hand and abrasive wounds in her private parts. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...

During a recess of a meeting to audit the Environmental Department's budgets, a DPP legislator fell down a set of stairs under mysterious circumstances. The DPP legislator suffered bleeding, as well as bruises to his head, neck, hand, and abdomen. It is rumored that a KMT legislator was behind this mysterious accident. After this incident, the Legislative Yuan installed closed-circuit cameras on the stairwells. April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... television cameras for surveillance. ...

People First Party legislator Li Qing-an accused a school of accepting illegal financial contributions during an Education Committee Q&A session with Education Minister Zheng Zhi-Lang. At this time, KMT legislator Luo Fu-juo accused Li of secretly accusing Luo. A quarrel ensued, and Luo slapped Li in the face after Li poured tea over Luo. April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


Recent times

As mentioned earlier, many people believed that the current legislative violence are not as real as those in the 90's, and has turned into a contest where politicians generate trash (ie. by throwing lunchboxes at each other) — a political show for politicians to garner media attention and votes. Look up trash in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Specific events

During a debate on a military hardware purchase ordinance, the opposition and ruling party engaged in a food fight after a disagreement broke out. [1] October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A food fight portrayed in The Wild Thornberrys Movie A food fight is a spontaneous form of chaotic collective behavior, in which food is thrown around a room, usually a cafeteria, in the manner of projectiles. ...

A serious scuffle broke out between the ruling and opposition party members after an argument over vote recounts from the presidential election. March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ...

A People First Party legislator entered into open disagreement with a group of DPP legislators over certain administrative matters, and fought each other on the floors of the Legislative Yuan. November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...

Wikinews has news related to:
Taiwan MP shoves proposal in mouth

Amid a proposal about creating direct transport links with Mainland China, DPP deputy Wang Shu-hui snatched the written proposal and shoved it into her mouth. Opposition members failed to get her to cough it up by pulling her hair. She later spat the proposal out and tore it up. This is the third time that the DPP’s actions have stopped a vote over this issue. May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Three Links or Three Linkages (Chinese: 三通; pinyin: sān tōng) are direct postal (通郵 tōng yóu), transportation (especially airline) (通航 tōng háng), and trade (通商 tōng shāng) links between Mainland China and Taiwan. ...


During the incident another DPP member, Chuang Ho-tzu, spat at an opposition member.


South Korea

During a National Assembly vote on the motion to impeach President Roh Moo-hyun, supporters of the President openly clashed with opposition MPs for 20 minutes in an effort to stop the vote (which was in favor of impeachment) from being finalized. March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Assembly is the South Korean parliament. ... Roh Moo-hyun (born September 1, 1946) has been the President of South Korea since February 25, 2003. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


United Kingdom

During a dispute over the conduct of British soldiers on Bloody Sunday, Independent Socialist MP Bernadette Devlin punched the then Conservative Party Home Secretary Reginald Maudling. Her aggression was in response to the comments made by Maudling, who was maintaining that the British Army had fired at Bloody Sunday protesters in self-defence, contrary to the testimonies of civilian eye-witnesses (including Devlin herself). She argued that she was being denied the right to speak. Her actions resulted in her being banned from the British House of Commons for six months. Bloody Sunday can refer to any of the following historical events (in chronological order): Bloody Sunday (1887), violence in London on 13 November 1887. ... Josephine Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (born April 23, 1947), also known as Bernadette Devlin and Bernadette McAliskey, is a Northern Ireland republican politician. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ... Rt. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


References

  • The July 8th version of this article uses the translation of the corresponding Chinese-language Wikipedia article.
  • Taiwan deputy halts vote by chomping China proposal, Reuters, May 30, 2006

 
 

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