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Encyclopedia > Legislative Yuan
The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the children's hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital).

The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yuàn, literally "law-establishing court") is the legislative body of the Republic of China (ROC), which administers Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen, and Matsu Islands. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1065x957, 208 KB)The Legislative Yuan building partially blocked by a newly build Childrens hospital section of the National Taiwan University Hospital. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1065x957, 208 KB)The Legislative Yuan building partially blocked by a newly build Childrens hospital section of the National Taiwan University Hospital. ... Alternative meaning: Chiang Chung-cheng Zhongzheng District (中正區, Wade-Giles: Chung-cheng, Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongjheng) is the home of the most of the national government buildings of the Republic of China. ... Alternative meaning: Taipei County City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH, 國立台灣大學附設醫院) started operations in Dadaocheng on June 20, 1895, and moved to its present location in 1897. ... Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), commonly called Pinyin, is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... Motto none Anthem National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital (and largest city) Taipei Official languages Standard Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Demonym Taiwanese Government Semi-presidential system  -  President Chen Shui-bian  -  Vice President Annette Lu  -  Premier Chang Chun-hsiung Establishment Xinhai Revolution   -  Independence declared October 10, 1911   -  Republic established January... The Pescadores Islands (Chinese: 澎湖群島; Wade-Giles: Peng-hu; Pinyin: Pénghú, from Portuguese, fishermen) are an archipelago in the Taiwan Strait. ... Kinmen (Traditional Chinese: 金門; Hanyu Pinyin: JÄ«nmén; Tongyong Pinyin: Jinmén; Wade-Giles: Chin-men; POJ: Kim-mnÌ‚g; also romanized Quemoy from Southern Min (in early Spanish romanization); literally Golden Door or Golden Gate), located at 24. ... The Matsu Islands (馬祖列島 or less frequently, 馬祖群島 Pinyin: MÇŽzÇ”) are a minor archipelago of 19 islands and islets in the Taiwan Strait administered as Lienchiang County (連江 Pinyin: Liánjiāng), Fukien Province of the Republic of China (ROC, now based on Taiwan). ...


The Legislative Yuan is one of the five branches (called 'yuàn', "courts") of government stipulated by the Constitution of the Republic of China, which follows Sun Yat-sen's Three Principles of the People. Although sometimes referred to as a "parliament," the Legislative Yuan, under Sun's political theory, is a branch of government in a presidential system, while only the National Assembly of the Republic of China (now abolished), with the power to amend the constitution and formerly to elect the President and Vice President, could be considered a parliament. Nevertheless, after constitutional amendments effectively transferred almost all of the National Assembly's powers to the Legislative Yuan in the late 1990s, it became common in Taiwanese newspapers to refer to the Legislative Yuan as the parliament (國會, guóhuì). The Constitution of the Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFÇŽ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China (ROC) , namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of Lienchiang county... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. ... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ... A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where the executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separate from the legislature, to which it is not accountable, and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... The National Assembly (Traditional Chinese: 國民大會; Simplified Chinese: 国民大会; Pinyin: ) refers to several parliamentary bodies that existed in the history of the Republic of China. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...

Contents

Composition

The current and 6th Legislative Yuan has 225 members. Current legislators have come to office in different ways:

  • 168 are elected by popular vote
  • 41 are elected on the basis of the proportion of nationwide votes received by participating political parties.
  • Eight are allocated for overseas Chinese and are selected by the parties on the basis of the proportion of votes received nationwide.
  • Eight seats are reserved for the aboriginal populations, with half of those seats directly elected and half allocated by party lists.

Members serve three-year terms. The election method is single non-transferable vote which produces interesting electoral strategies. Languages various Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... A Rukai village Chief visiting the Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ... The Single Non-Transferable Vote or SNTV is an electoral system used in multi-member constituency elections. ...

Composition of the Republic of China Legislative Yuan as of 19th April, 2007
Coalitions and parties Seats
Pan-Blue Coalition 110
Kuomintang / Nationalist Party of China 中國國民黨 (Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang,KMT) 88
People First Party 親民黨 (Ch'in Min Tang) 22
Pan-Green Coalition 97
Democratic Progressive Party 民主進步黨 (Minchu Chinpu Tang) 85
Taiwan Solidarity Union 台灣團結聯盟 (Taiwan Tuanjie Lianmeng) 12
Others 11
無黨團結聯盟 Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (Wudang Tuanjie Lianmeng) 6
Non-party 5

On 19th April 2007, legislator Lee Sen-zong announced that he had resigned from the KMT. Initial reports suggested he was defecting to the DPP, but currently he is acting as an independent.[1] The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: QÄ«nmíndÇŽng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Image File history File links Democratic_Progressive_Party_of_Taiwan_flag. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...

[discuss] – [edit]
Summary of the 11 December 2004 Republic of China Legislative Yuan election results
Coalitions and parties Votes % Seats Change
Pan-Blue Coalition 114 -1
Kuomintang / Nationalist Party of China 中國國民黨 (Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang,KMT) 3,190,081 34.90 79 +11
People First Party 親民黨 (Ch'in Min Tang) 1,350,613 14.78 34 –12
New Party 新黨 (Hsin-Tang) 12,137 0.13 1
Pan-Green Coalition 101 +1
Democratic Progressive Party 民主進步黨 (Minchu Chinpu Tang) 3,471,429 37.98 89 +2
Taiwan Solidarity Union 台灣團結聯盟 (Taiwan Tuanchie Lianmeng) 756,712 8.28 12 –1
Others 10
無黨團結聯盟 Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (Wudang Tuanjie Lianmeng) 353,164 3.86 6 –5
Non-partisans 4
Total (turnout ) 9,140,067 225
5% vote threshold needed for proportional seat assignment

The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: QÄ«nmíndÇŽng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Image File history File links Democratic_Progressive_Party_of_Taiwan_flag. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ...

Work

The Legislative Yuan has the power to pass all ordinary legislation. The amount of control the Legislative Yuan has over the Executive Yuan was unclear throughout the 1990s, but a convention has developed that the Executive Yuan is responsible to the President of the Republic of China and not the Legislative Yuan. The Executive Yuan (行政院; literally executive court) is the executive branch of the government of the Republic of China. ...


Much of the work of the Legislative Yuan is done via legislative committees, and a common sight on Taiwanese television involves officials of the executive branch answering extremely hostile questions from opposition members in committees. In the 1990s, there were a number of cases of fist fights breaking out on the floor, usually triggered by some perceived unfair procedure ruling, but in recent years, these have become less common. There was a brawl involving 50 legislators in January 2007 and an incident involving 40 legislators on 8 May 2007 when a speaker attempted to speak about reconfiguring the Central Election Committee. It has been alleged that fights are staged and planned in advance. [1] For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


The other Yuans are authorized to propose legislative bills to the Legislative Yuan. Legislative bills proposed by the Legislative Yuan have to be cosigned by a certain number of legislators. Once a bill reaches the legislature, it is subject to a process of three readings.


History

Republic of China

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the Republic of China
Motto none Anthem National Anthem of the Republic of China Capital (and largest city) Taipei Official languages Standard Mandarin (GuóyÇ”) Demonym Taiwanese Government Semi-presidential system  -  President Chen Shui-bian  -  Vice President Annette Lu  -  Premier Chang Chun-hsiung Establishment Xinhai Revolution   -  Independence declared October 10, 1911   -  Republic established January... Image File history File links Republic_of_China_National_Emblem. ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ...

Fundamentals:

History - Civil War - 3 Principles
Constitution - National Assembly The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) succeeded the Qing Dynasty in 1912, ending 2,000 years of imperial rule. ... Combatants Kuomintang of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War (Traditional... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ... The National Assembly (Traditional Chinese: 國民大會; Simplified Chinese: 国民大会; Pinyin: ) refers to several parliamentary bodies that existed in the history of the Republic of China. ...


Executives:
President: Chen Shui-bian
Premier: Chang Chun-hsiung The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... Chang Chun-hsiung (Chinese: 張俊雄; pinyin: Zhāng Jùnxióng) (born March 23, 1938) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


Branches:
Executive - Legislative - Judicial
Control - Examination
The Judicial Yuan is located directly east of the Presidential Office in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ... The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ...


Parties:
List - Elections - Tangwai Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... Elections in the Republic of China gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (with effective control over Taiwan, Quemoy, Matsu and some islands in the South China Sea since 1949). ... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ...


Status:
Political - Legal - Republic
Independence - Reunification
Taiwan Strait area The controversy regarding the political status of Taiwan hinges on whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of... The legal question of which legal entity holds de jure sovereignty over Taiwan is a controversial issue. ... A flag for the proposed independent Taiwan designed in the mid-1990s. ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ...


Relations:
Foreign relations - UN
Cross-Strait - 1 China - 2 systems The Republic of China (ROC) , now only constituting the island of Taiwan and a few smaller islands, is currently recognized by 24 states, including the Holy See of Vatican City. ... Chinas seat in the United Nations has been occupied by the Peoples Republic of China since October 25, 1971. ... Taiwan Strait Cross-Strait relations, or relations across the Taiwan Strait, deals with the complex relationship and interactions between the mainland nation of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) (which sits on the west of Taiwan Strait) and the island nation of the Republic of China (Taiwan), commonly known... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ...


Other issues:
Political divisions
Human rights - Localization
Chinese Taipei - Four-stage theory The Republic of China (ROC) currently administers two historical provinces of China (one completely and one for a small part) and centrally administers two municipalities: Taiwan Province; consists of the island of Taiwan, except the two municipalities, plus Penghu county (Pescadores Islands) and a number of outlying islands Sixteen counties... The human rights record of Taiwan is generally held to have experienced significant transformation over the last two decades. ... Localization or Taiwanization (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Pe̍h-oē-jī: pún-thó͘-hòa) is a political term used within Taiwan to emphasize the importance of Taiwans culture rather than to regard Taiwanese as solely an appendage of China. ... The Four-Stage Theory of the Republic of China or the Theory of the Four Stages of the Republic of China (Chinese: 中華民國四階段論; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó Sì Jiēduàn Lùn) is proposed by Chen Shui-bian, the current (10th and 11th terms) president of the Republic of...


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The original Legislative Yuan was formed in the original Capital of Nanjing after the completion of the Northern Expedition. Its 51 members were appointed to a term of two years. The 4th Legislative Yuan under this period had its members expanded to 194, and its term in office was extended to 14 years because of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945). According to KMT political theory, these first four sessions marked the period of political tutelage. Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ...   (Chinese: 南京; Romanizations: NánjÄ«ng (Pinyin), Nan-ching (Wade-Giles), Nanking (Postal map spelling)) is the capital of Chinas Jiangsu Province and a city with a prominent place in Chinese history and culture. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Second Sino-Japanese War was a major invasion of eastern China by Japan preceding and during World War II. It ended with the surrender of Japan in 1945. ...


The current Constitution of the Republic of China came into effect on December 25, 1947 and the first Legislative session convened in Nanking on May 18, 1948 with 760 members. Six preparatory meetings had been held on May 8, 1948 they, during which Dr. Sun Fo and Mr. Chen Li-fu were elected President and Vice President of the body, respectively. In 1949, the mainland fell to the Communists and the Legislative Yuan (along with the entire ROC government) was transplanted to Taipei. On February 24, 1950, 380 members convened at the Sun Yat-sen Hall in Taipei. The Constitution of the Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFÇŽ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China (ROC) , namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of Lienchiang county... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Sun Ke or Sun Fo (Chinese: 孫科)(October 21, 1891–September 13, 1973) was a high-ranking official in the government of the Republic of China. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China, a position guaranteed by the countrys constitution. ... For other uses, see Taipei (disambiguation). ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first Legislative Yuan was to have been elected for a term of three years ending in 1951; however, the fall of the Mainland made it impossible to hold new elections. As a result, the Judicial Yuan decided that the members of the Legislative Yuan would continue to hold office until new elections could be held on the Mainland. Over the years, deceased members elected on the mainland were not replaced while additional seats were created for Taiwan starting with eleven seats in 1969. Fifty-one new members were elected to a three-year term in 1972, fifty-two in 1975, ninety-seven in 1980, ninety-eight in 1983, one hundred in 1986, and one hundred thirty in 1989. Although the elected members of the Legislative Yuan did not have the majority to defeat legislation, they were able to use the Legislature Yuan as a platform to express political dissent. Until 1991, opposition parties in Taiwan were formally illegal. However in the 1970s, candidates to the Legislative Yuan would run as Tangwai or outside the party and in 1985, candidates began to run under the banner of the Democratic Progressive Party. 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Judicial Yuan is located directly east of the Presidential Office in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Individual rights Free speech, free press Soap box, Speakers corner (Hyde Park), blog (weblog) prior restraint, censorship, self-censorship, censor Right to assembly Gay rights, Stonewall Feminism, ERA, equal pay, Title IX Famous political dissenters Gandhi Steve Biko Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: MínjìndÇŽng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has...


The original members of the Legislative Yuan remained until December 31, 1991, when as part of subsequent Judicial Yuan ruling, they were forced to retire and the members elected in 1989 remained until the 161 members of the Second Legislative Yuan was elected in December 1992. The third LY, elected in 1995, had 157 members serving 3-year terms. The fourth LY, elected in 1998, was expanded to 225 members in part to include legislators from the abolished provincial legislature of Taiwan Province. December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Taiwan Province can refer to an existing administrative division under the government of the Republic of China or the claimed 23rd province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


The Legislative Yuan greatly increased its prominence after the 2000 Presidential elections in Taiwan when the Executive Yuan and presidency was controlled by the Democratic Progressive Party while the Legislative Yuan had a large majority of Kuomintang members. The legislative elections in late 2001 produced a contentious situation in which the pan-blue coalition has only a thin majority over the governing pan-green coalition in the legislature [2], making the passage of bills often dependent on the votes of a few defectors and independents. Because of the party situation there have been constitutional conflicts between the Legislative Yuan and the executive branch over the process of appointment for the premier and whether the president has the power to call a special session. The Election for the 10th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第十任中華民國總統、副總統選舉), the second ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan and the 10th... The Executive Yuan (行政院; literally executive court) is the executive branch of the government of the Republic of China. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; abbreviated to or ; Hanyu Pinyin: MínjìndÇŽng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ...


Amid 70% public support, the Legislative Yuan voted 217-1 on August 23, 2004 for a package of amendments to: August 23 is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • halve the number of seats from 225 to 113
  • switch to a single-member district parallel voting electoral system
  • increase the terms of members from 3 to 4 years, to synchronize the legislative and presidential elections. (It is unclear whether this will be implemented for the next presidential and legislative elections.)

The new electoral system will include 73 plurality seats (one for each electoral district), 6 seats for aboriginals, with the remaining 34 seats to be filled from party lists. Every county has a minimum of 1 electoral district, thereby guaranteed at least one seat in the legislature, while party lists for the porportionally represented seats must be half women. Parallel voting describes a mixed voting system where voters in effect participate in two separate elections using different systems, and where the results in one election have little or no impact on the results of the other. ... The Election for the 12th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (Chinese: 第十二任中華民國總統副總統選舉) may be held in March 2008 (but as is customary in Taiwanese elections, the date will probably not be determined until late 2007); it may also be held on the same day as the... Legislative elections may be held in December 2007 in the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... A Rukai villege Chief visiting Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ... Party-list proportional representation systems are a family of voting systems used in multiple-winner elections (e. ...


Additionally, the Legislative Yuan proposed to abolish the National Assembly. Future amendments would still be proposed by the LY by a three-fourths vote from a quorum of at least three-fourths of all members of the Legislature. After a mandatory 180-day promulgation period, the amendment would have to be ratified by an absolute majority of all eligible voters of the ROC irrespective of voter turnout. The latter requirement would allow a party to kill a referendum proposal by asking that their voters boycott the vote as was done by the KMT with the referenda associated with the 2004 Presidential Election. Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ...


A DPP proposal to allow the citizen right to initiate constitutional referenda was pulled off the table due to a lack of support. The proposal for a right to initiative was criticized for dangerously lowering the threshold for considering a constitutional amendment. Whereas a three-fourth vote of the LY would require that any proposed constitutional amendment have a broad political consensus behind it, a citizen's initiative would allow a fraction of the electorate to force a constitutional referendum. It was feared that allowing this to occur would result in a referendum on Taiwan independence which would likely result in a crisis with the People's Republic of China. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Legislative Yuan also proposed to give itself the power to summon the president for an annual "state of the nation" address and launch a recall of the president and vice president (proposed by one fourth and approved by two thirds of the legislators and be submitted to a nationwide referendum for approval or rejection by majority vote). The Legislative Yuan will also have the power to propose the impeachment of the president or vice president to the Council of Grand Justices. The term recall has a number of meanings: Product recall A recall election Recall to employment after a layoff Recall from memory. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ...


An ad hoc National Assembly was elected and formed in 2005 to ratify the amendments. The downsized Legislative Yuan will take effect in 2008. An election for the National Assembly will be held in the Republic of China on Taiwan on Saturday 2005-05-14, from 07:30 to 16:00 local time. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


List of Presidents of the Legislative Yuan

Before the implement of the 1947 Constitution:

  1. Hu Hanmin October 1928 - January 1, 1932
  2. Chang Ji January 1, 1932 - January 29, 1932
  3. Sun Fo January 29, 1932 - May 17, 1947

After the implement of the 1947 Constitution: Hu Hanmin (Chinese:胡漢民(trad. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sun Ke or Sun Fo (Chinese: 孫科)(October 21, 1891–September 13, 1973) was a high-ranking official in the government of the Republic of China. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ...

  1. Sun Fo May 17, 1947 - December 24, 1948
  2. Tung Gun-shin December 24, 1948 - December 1, 1950
  3. Liu Jin-chin December 5, 1950 - October 19, 1951
    (acting) Huang Guo-shu October 19, 1951 - March 11, 1952 (acting)
  4. Chang Tao-fan March 11, 1952 - February 20, 1961
  5. Huang Guo-shu February 28, 1961 - February 22, 1972
  6. Ni Wen-ya February 22, 1972 - December 20, 1988, passed away June 11, 2006
  7. Liu Kwo-tsai October 18, 1988 - February 12, 1990
  8. Liang Su-yung February 12, 1990 - January 17, 1992
  9. Liu Sung-pan January 17, 1992 - February 1, 1999
  10. Wang Jin-pyng February 1, 1999 -

Sun Ke or Sun Fo (Chinese: 孫科)(October 21, 1891–September 13, 1973) was a high-ranking official in the government of the Republic of China. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Liu Sung-pan 劉松藩 (born December 3, 1931) was the President of the Legislative Yuan of the Republic of China between 1992 to 1999. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Wang Jin-pyng (Chinese: 王金平, pinyin: Wáng JÄ«npíng) (born March 17, 1941), Taiwanese politician, is the President of the Legislative Yuan. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also

The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ... The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ... The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) succeeded the Qing Dynasty in 1912, ending 2,000 years of imperial rule. ... The Judicial Yuan is located directly east of the Presidential Office in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Elections to the Legislative Yuan of the Republic of China: 1st Legislative Yuan: ROC legislative election, 1948 ROC legislative election, 1969 ROC legislative election, 1972 ROC legislative election, 1975 ROC legislative election, 1980 ROC legislative election, 1983 ROC legislative election, 1986 ROC legislative election, 1989 2nd Legislative Yuan: ROC legislative... Legislative violence broadly refers to any violent clashes between members of a nations legislature. ...

External link

  • Republic of China Legislative Yuan Official site
Flag of the Republic of China Politics of the Republic of China
v  d  e
 
Constitution of the Republic of China - Three Principles of the People
———
President - Vice President - Premier
Executive Yuan | Legislative Yuan | Judicial Yuan | Control Yuan | Examination Yuan
———
Political parties | Elections
———
Political status | Legal status | Chinese reunification | Taiwan independence

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ... The Constitution of the Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFÇŽ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China (ROC) , namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of Lienchiang county... Sun Yat-sen, who developed the Three Principles of the People. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China, located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City, also houses the office of the Vice President. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... The Executive Yuan (行政院; literally executive court) is the executive branch of the government of the Republic of China. ... The Judicial Yuan is located directly east of the Presidential Office in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ... The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ... Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... Elections in the Republic of China gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (with effective control over Taiwan, Quemoy, Matsu and some islands in the South China Sea since 1949). ... Taiwan Strait area The controversy regarding the political status of Taiwan hinges on whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of... The legal question of which legal entity holds de jure sovereignty over Taiwan is a controversial issue. ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Reference

  1. ^ "Parliamentary antics said to be staged", Taiwan News (newspaper), Vol. 58, No. 322, 18 May, 2007, p. 2

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