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Encyclopedia > Legislative Council of Hong Kong

Drawn by Jerry Crimson Mann 15:47, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC). ...

This article is part of the series
Politics of Hong Kong

Basic Law On July 1, 1997, Hong Kong was resumed to Chinese control, when the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), ending more than 150 years of British colonial control. ... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ...

Government
    Chief Executive
    Executive Council
    Departments and agencies
Legislative Council
Judiciary
    Court of Final Appeal
District Councils
Foreign relations
The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官; Simplified Chinese: 香港特别行政区行政长官; Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1 hang4 zing3 zoeng2 gun1; pinyin: XiÄ... The Executive Council (ExCo) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China is an organ in the Executive branch of the political structure of Hong Kong. ... Departments and agencies are controlled by the Hong Kong Government. ... The Judiciary of Hong Kong is responsible for the administration of justice in Hong Kong. ... A court of final appeal is the court with the final adjudication power on the local laws in a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The District Councils (區議會 and formerly District Boards) are district organizations in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). ... Hong Kongs diplomatic relations and defence are the responsibility of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Elections are held in Hong Kong when certain offices in the government need to be filled. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ...

The Legislative Council (abbreviated as LegCo; Chinese: 立法會, Pinyin: Lìfǎ Huì; formerly 立法局, Lìfǎ Jú) is the unicameral legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. HànyÇ” PÄ«nyÄ«n (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), often shortened to pinyin (Chinese: 拼音, pÄ«nyÄ«n), which literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese, is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) (Simplified Chinese: 特别行政区; Traditional Chinese: 特別行政區; pinyin: tèbié xíngzhèngqÅ«; Cantonese IPA: /tɐk6piːt6 hɐŋ4tsɪŋ3kʰɵy1/; Jyutping: dak6bit6 hang4zing3keoi1; Yale: dahkbiht hàhngjingkeÅ«i) is a political subdivision of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Contents


History

Formed as a colonial legislature (Legislative Council) under the British, the first direct elections of LegCo took place in 1991. In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ... A Legislative Council in British constitutional thought is the second-to-top tier of a government led by a Governor-General, Governor or a Lieutenant-Governor, inferior to an Executive Council and equal to or superior to a Legislative Assembly. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Legislative Council of Hong Kong has been housed in the Old Supreme Court building in Central since 1985. The Old Supreme Court Building (Chinese: 最高法院大厦) is the former courthouse of the Supreme Court of Singapore, before it moved out of the building and commenced operations in the new building on 20 June 2005. ... District slogan: none Location within Hong Kong S.A.R. (Click here for satellite image) District Council Chairman Chan Tak-chor Area   â€“Land   â€“Water 12. ... This article is about the year. ...


The statue on the LegCo building is a replica of the one erected on the Old Bailey of London. It is the goddess of justice, Themis. It was a left-over from the former Supreme Court. Legislative Council Building The Former Supreme Court Building is located in Central, Hong Kong, along the eastern side of Statue Square. ... The Old Bailey by Mountford (1907) The Central Criminal Court, commonly known as The Old Bailey (a bailey being part of a castle), is a Crown Court (criminal high court) in London, dealing with major criminal cases in the UK. It stands on the site of the mediaeval Newgate Gaol... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ...


Unlike most Commonwealth legislature, the Hong Kong Legco does not have a cermonial mace placed in the chambers. The power and authoirity is held by the Chief Executive (formerly the Governor). However, the high courts of Hong Kong use a mace to open sessions and represents the authority and powers of the court. Assorted maces This article is about the personal weapon and its ceremonial derivative, for other meanings of mace please see mace (disambiguation) An advance on the club, a mace is a wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ...


Organisation

The Legislative Council Building
The Legislative Council Building

The term of office of a legislator is four years in length, except for the first term from 1998 to 2000 which was set at two years (Article 69, Basic Law). Image File history File linksMetadata HongKongLegcoBuilding2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata HongKongLegcoBuilding2. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


In the 2004 election, 30 members were directly elected by universal suffrage from geographical constituencies (GC) and 30 were elected from functional constituencies. In the previous election in 2000, 24 were directly elected, 6 elected from a 800-member electoral college called the Election Committee of Hong Kong, and 30 elected from functional constituencies. The method of election after 2007 has not been specified. The Basic Law states that the ultimate aim is the election of all the Legco members by universal suffrage (Article 68 of the Basic Law of Hong Kong). Elections for the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo) were held on September 12, 2004. ... Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of suffrage, or the right to vote, to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, or social status. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... This page discusses the college of electors in Hong Kong politics. ... A functional constituency, in Hong Kong politics, refers to professional and special interest groups involved in the electoral process. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of suffrage, or the right to vote, to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, or social status. ... Article 68 The Legislative Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region shall be constituted by election. ...


Private members' bills and motions have to be passed by majorities in both chambers off the legislature - members returned from geographical constituencies and election committee, and members returned from functional constituencies. This arrangement, however, is not necessary for government bills, with only a simple majority required to secure passage. Meanwhile, amendments to the Basic Law require a two-thirds vote in LegCo for passage, but without a specific requirement in each chamber. After passing LegCo, the amendment must be approved by a supermajority of the same size among Hong Kong's delegates to the National People's Congress, and also the approval of the Chief Executive (since veto power is given to him).(Article 159, Basic Law) A majority is a subset of a group that is more than half of the entire group. ... Many parliaments or other legislatures consist of two chambers: an elected lower house, and an upper house or Senate which may be appointed or elected by a different mechanism from the lower house. ... A simple majority is the most common requirement in voting for a measure to pass, especially in deliberative bodies and small organizations. ... Amendment has at least two meanings: An amendment is a formal alteration to any official document or record, typically with the aim of improving it. ... A two-thirds majority is a common supermajoritarian requirement in elections, especially whenever minority rights can be changed (e. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Constituencies

Geographical constituencies

The GC seats are returned by universal suffrage. The voting system adopted in these electoral districts is a system of party-list proportional representation (PR), with seats allocated by the largest remainder method using the Hare quota as the quota for election. The system is widely considered to give representative legislatures. There were 3.06 million registered voters. Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of suffrage, or the right to vote, to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, or social status. ... Party-list proportional representation systems are a family of voting systems used in multiple-winner elections (e. ... The largest remainder method is one way of allocating seats proportionally for representative assemblies with party list voting systems. ... The Hare quota is a formula used to calculate the minimum number, or quota, of votes required to capture a seat in some forms of single transferable vote or largest remainder method party-list proportional representation voting systems. ...

Geographical constituencies No. of Seats
2000 2004
Hong Kong Island 5 6
Kowloon East 4 5
Kowloon West 4 4
New Territories East 5 7
New Territories West 6 8
Total 24 30

In Hong Kong, geographical constituencies, as opposed to functional constituencies, are elected by all eligible voters according to geographically demarcated constituencies. ... Hong Kong Island is Hong Kong constituency in the Legislative Council. ... Kowloon East is Hong Kong constituency in the Legislative Council. ... Kowloon West is Hong Kong constituency in the Legislative Council. ... New Territories East is Hong Kong constituency in the Legislative Council. ... New Territories West is Hong Kong constituency in the Legislative Council. ...

Functional constituencies

(Compare with 'business votes' in the City of London) For London as a whole, see the main article London. ...


There are 28 functional constituencies (FC) represented in LegCo, representing various sectors of the community which were considered playing a crucial role in the development of Hong Kong. A functional constituency, in Hong Kong politics, refers to professional and special interest groups involved in the electoral process. ...


In the 2000 election, 27 of the FCs returned 1 member, except the Labour functional constituency which returned 3 members, giving a total of 30 FC seats.

  • Heung Yee Kuk
  • Agriculture and fisheries
  • Insurance
  • Financial services
  • Transport
  • Accountancy
  • Finance
  • Education
  • Legal
  • Information technology
  • Medical
  • Health services
  • Architectural, surveying and planning
  • Real estate and construction
  • Social welfare
  • Tourism
  • Commercial (first)
  • Commercial (second)
  • Industrial (first)
  • Industrial (second)
  • Import and export
  • Wholesale and retail
  • Textiles and garment
  • Sport, performing arts, culture and publication
  • Catering
  • District Council
  • Labour

A simple plurality system was used for 23 of the FCs, in which an eligible voter may cast one vote. The exceptions were Labour FC in which a voter may cast up to three votes, thereby creating a block vote, and the Heung Yee Kuk, Agriculture and Fisheries, Insurance, and Transport FCs where a preferential elimination system was used due to the small number of voters. In the latter a voter must indicate preferences rather than approval/disapproval or a single choice. The Heung Yee Kuk (鄉議局, literally rural consultative agency) is a statutory advisory body in the New Territories, Hong Kong. ... The District Councils (區議會 and formerly District Boards) are district organizations in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). ... The First Past the Post electoral system, is a voting system for single-member districts. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) (also called Plurality-at-large) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single constituency. ... When the single transferable vote voting system is applied to a single-winner election it is sometimes called instant-runoff voting (IRV), as it is much like holding a series of runoff elections in which the lowest polling candidate is eliminated in each round until someone receives majority vote. ...


Election Committee

10 LegCo members and were returned by the Election Committee (EC) in the 1998 election, and 6 in the 2000 election, in accordance with Annex II of the Basic Law. Now this college of electors is used only to elect the Chief Executive. There are 800 members in the EC, coming from four sectors with 200 members each. (Basic Law, Ann.1, Sect. 2)

  • Industrial, commercial and financial sectors
  • The professions
  • Labour, social services, religious and other sectors
  • Members of the LegCo, representatives of district-based organisations, Hong Kong deputies to the National People's Congress (NPC), and representatives of Hong Kong members of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC).

Most of the 800 EC members were returned by earlier sub-sector elections. The 6 LegCo members were chosen by a "first-past-the-post" system, with each EC member casting a vote to choose exactly 6 candidates among themselves. The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Chinese Peoples Political Consultative Conference (中国人民政治协商会议 Pinyin: Zhongguo renmin zhengzhi xieshang huiyi), abbreviated CPPCC, is an advisory body in the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Seating arrangement

Members of the Legislative Councill are seated to the left and front of the President's chair in the chambers. The three rows to the right are reserved for the secretaries and other civil servants of the government, and other people whom appear in the meetings.


Presidents of the Legislative Council

Main articles: President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong, and [[]], and [[]], and [[]], and [[]]

The President is the speaker of the council. The President of the Legislative Council is the speaker of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (i. ...


Officers of the Legislative Council

Assisting the President are the officers of the Legco. The Clerk sits to the left of the President and the remaining officers at the large desk in the centre of the Council (3 chairs facing away from the President). When the CE (or Governor) is in Council, he or she will address from either a podium in front of the President or to the right of the President.


Clerk of the Legislative Council

  • Mr Cletus Lau Kwok Hong
  • Mr Ricky Fung Choi Cheung JP
  • Mr Law Kam Sang
  • Mrs Jennie Chok Pang Yuen Yee 1982-1986
  • Mr LI Wing
  • Ms. L. Tse 1974-1977
  • Mrs Lorna Leung Tsui Lai Man 1978-1982
  • Mr. Stephen Tam Shu Pui
  • Mr Kenneth Harry Wheeler
  • Mrs Lolly Tse Chiu Yuen Chu
  • Mr Roderick John Frampton
  • Mr Geoffery Cadzow Hamilton
  • Mr. JAE Bullock
  • Mr A. Dyer Ball
  • Mr R.F. Johnston
  • Mr,. A.M. Thompson
  • Mr J. Stewart-Lockhart

Deputy Clerk - alternate to the Clerk; replaced by the Secretary General

  • Mr Donald Barton
  • Mr Andrew Macdonald Chapman
  • Mr Ronald Thompson
  • Mr R. Edwards
  • Mr C. G. Burgess
  • Mr. D.R. Holmes MBE MC

Secretary General - alternate to the Clerk

  • Mr Ricky Fung Choi Cheung JP
  • Mr Law Kam Sang

Deputy Secretary General - alternate to the Secretary General

  • Mr Law Kam Sang
  • Ms Pauline Ng Man Wah

See also

On July 1, 1997, Hong Kong was resumed to Chinese control, when the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), ending more than 150 years of British colonial control. ... Elections for the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo) were held on September 12, 2004. ... Rita Fan Hsu Lai-tai (范徐麗泰) GBS, JP, MA, BSc (born 1945) is the President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LEGCO) and represents a geographical constituency of Hong Kong Island. ...

External links

  • Legislative Council of Hong Kong
  • Electoral Affairs Commission

  Results from FactBites:
 
Legislative Council of Hong Kong - Biocrawler (0 words)
The Legislative Council of Hong Kong (立法會, abbreviated LegCo) is the legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China.
In the previous election in 2000, 24 were directly elected, 6 elected from a 800-member electoral college called the Election Committee of Hong Kong, and 30 elected from functional constituencies.
In February 1993, the governor ceased to be member and president of the council.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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