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Encyclopedia > Legislation

Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body. The term may refer to a single law, or the collective body of enacted law, while "statute" is also used to refer to a single law. Before an item of legislation becomes law it may be known as a bill, which is typically also known as "legislation" while it remains under active consideration. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Promulgation is the act of formally proclaiming new legislation to the public. ... Look up Act on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Act may refer to: in law, a written document that attests the legality of the transaction. ... A legislature is a type of deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ...


In some jurisdictions, legislation must be confirmed by the executive branch of government before it enters into force as law. In political science and greek constitutional law, the executive is the branch of government responsible for the day-to-day management of the state. ...


Under the Westminster system, an item of legislation is known as an Act of Parliament after enactment. The Houses of Parliament in London The Westminster system is a democratic, parliamentary system of government modeled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ...


Legislation is usually proposed by a member of the legislature (e.g. a member of Congress or Parliament), or by the executive, whereupon it is debated by members of the legislature and is often amended before passage. Most large legislatures enact only a small fraction of the bills proposed in a given session. Whether a given bill will be proposed and enter into force is generally a matter of the legislative priorities of government. Look up Passage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Look up Session in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coming into force refers to the date on which a legislation, or part of legislation, becomes a law. ...


Those who have the formal power to create legislation are known as legislators, while the judicial branch of government may have the formal power to interpret legislation (see statutory interpretation). ζōA legislator is a person who writes and passes laws, especially someone who is a member of a legislature. ... Statutory interpretation is the process of interpreting and applying legislation. ...

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Alternate means of law-making

The act of making legislation is sometimes known as legislating. Under the doctrine of separation of powers, the law-making function is primarily the responsibility of the legislature. However, there are situations where legislation is enacted by other means (most commonly when constitutional law is enacted). These other forms of law-making include referenda and constitutional conventions. The term "legislation" is sometimes used to describe these situations, but other times, the term is used to distinguish acts of the legislature from these other lawmaking forms. It has been suggested that Balance of powers be merged into this article or section. ... Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ... Ballots of the Argentine plebiscite of 1984 on the border treaty with Chile A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


The interpretation of law by the executive branch or the judiciary has been contended by some to be law-making, particularly when the judicial branch must address laws that appear to conflict (such as constitutional and statutory law). The extent to which the courts may be seen to "legislate" in this manner informs the ongoing contemporary debate concerning judicial activism (which may be contrasted with judicial restraint). Judicial law-making is not generally referred to as "legislation", however, except ironically. Also, some country's laws will empower the executive branch or other government agency to issue regulations or decrees which can carry the force of law, although this is also generally not considered legislation, per se. Legislation can also be created at provincial and local levels of government (which have their own legislatures), where separation of powers may be less formal and complete. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In law, the judiciary or judicial is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Judicial activism is the tendency of some judges to take a flexible view of their power of judicial interpretation, especially when such judges import subjective reasoning that displaces objective evaluation of applicable law. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Decree is an order that has the force of law. ...


Legislative history

The record of events and public statements of legislators that explain the reasons for the law and its expected meaning are called "legislative history". Often, this will include formal speeches or writings made by the bill's sponors and chief critics. Courts often refer to legislative history in interpreting legislation, in order to discern "legislative intent" -- or what legislators meant for the law to mean. However, there is a prevalent minority view among some judges that laws should be interpreted solely according to their text, and without regard to legislative intent. This debate is complicated by the fact that legislators will sometimes craft the text of a law to be intentionally obscure or vague as part of a political compromise, and that in a large legislative body, most of those who vote in favor of a bill will not have read the bill's full legislative history, or, indeed, the bill itself. Legislative history referes to various materials generated in the course of creating legislation, such as committee reports, analysis by legislative counsel, floor debates and histories of actions taken. ... In law, legislative intent is a factor used to interpret statutes. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ...


Legislation in various jurisdictions

The following is a List of Acts of Parliament of Canada passed since 1867. ... This is a list of Australian federal legislation. ... This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation, in chronological order. ... United Kingdom legislation comes from a number of different sources. ... The European Union legislative procedure describes the way the European Union creates and enacts legislation across the community. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Legislation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body.
Legislation can also be created at provincial and local levels of government (which have their own legislatures), where separation of powers may be less formal and complete.
The record of events and public statements of legislators that explain the reasons for the law and it's expected meaning are called "legislative history".
Legislation - Wex (530 words)
Legislation refers to the preparation and enactment of laws by a legislative body through its lawmaking process.
The legislative process includes evaluating, amending, and voting on proposed laws and is concerned with the words used in the bill to communicate the values, judgments, and purposes of the proposal.
Legislators also receive proposals from the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (http://www.nccusl.org/Update/); a conference of 250 lawyers appointed by governors to represent the states.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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